En De
Total doses
given
11.4M
People fully
vaccinated
4M
% Fully
vaccinated
74.06%
Masks
Not required
COVID-19 test
Not required
Quarantine
Not required
Passenger Locator Form
Not required
Health form
Not required
Vaccination
Not required
Insurance
Not required
Insurance
Not required
Pre-travel testing (vaccinated): None
Pre-travel testing (unvaccinated): None
Test on arrival (vaccinated): None
Test on arrival (unvaccinated): None

Latest News:

26.05.2021

Latest News: Government introduces changes on required documentation needed by foreigners to prove legal residency and eases entry restrictions (SVI, 17.05.2021). Government to continue use of quarantine hotels for all entering the country, extends guidance against non-essential travel until May 25 (Travel to Norway, 12.05.2021). Government plans to introduce vaccine certificates by early June to restore travel to and from country (Schengen Visa Info, 05.05.2021).

International Restrictions:

*From within the EU:

At present, most people cannot travel to Norway without belonging to one of the exceptions. This applies to citizens of all countries, including citizens from the EU/EEA and Nordic citizens. This includes:

  • Tourists
  • Family members not listed under the Exceptions: close family members section
  • boyfriend/girlfriend or fiancé;
  • EU/EEA citizens (including Nordic citizens) who are going to work or study in Norway, and who do not belong to any of the exceptions listed below
  • persons who have been granted a residence permit to work or study in Norway and who are not already resident here
  • business travelers
  • foreigners who have been granted a Schengen visa, but who do not belong to any of the exceptions below
  • persons who have leisure property in Norway, but are not resident here

List of exceptions (UDI.no)

The testing, travel registration, quarantine, and quarantine hotel requirements will remain in force for travellers who are exempt from the entry restrictions.

Vaccination does not currently affect quarantine requirements or test recommendations.

Is a quarantine required?

All travellers (including those who are resident in Norway) allowed to enter Norway from countries or regions that are defined as high-risk areas must complete a 10-day quarantine in a designated hotel. When you arrive in Norway from a high-risk country, you should travel directly to an appropriate place to stay during the quarantine period, preferably by private transport. If you need to use public transport, wearing a face mask throughout the journey is strongly required.

The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

Entry quarantine upon arrival in Norway from red countries/regions

Is a coronavirus test required?

All travellers from high-risk areas are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Approved test methods are PCR or rapid antigen test.
The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to arrival. For people arriving by plane, 24 hours apply before the scheduled departure time of the first flight.

The certificate must be in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, French or German. Foreign nationals who cannot document a negative Covid-19 test upon arrival can be refused entry to Norway.

This requirement does not apply to Norwegians, people living in Norway, people in transit or people who frequently cross the border from Sweden and Finland for work purposes.

The requirement does not apply to people who can document with an approved laboratory method that they have undergone COVID-19 during the last six months.

Test upon arrival: Anyone who has stayed in an area with a quarantine duty during the last 10 days before arrival has a duty to be tested at the border crossing point upon arrival in Norway. The test must be either PCR or rapid antigen test. In the case of a positive rapid antigen test, the person must take a PCR test within 24 hours of arrival.

Additional Travel Documentation

Everyone travelling to Norway must complete the registration form prior to crossing the border. This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

After completing the digital registration, you will receive a receipt which you must then present to the police at the border control. You cannot register your journey any earlier than 72 hours prior to the time of arrival.

Find out more:
Travel advice - helsenorge.no
International Travel rules
Entry rules
https://www.fhi.no/en/


Documents you need to travel in Europe

Health cover for temporary stays *Transit:

Transit is possible for citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries.
For updated information on countries and measures you can visit the page on the infection control advice for travel and entry quarantine

*From Third Countries:

At present, most people cannot travel to Norway without belonging to one of the exceptions. This applies to citizens of all countries, including the following categories:

  • Tourists
  • Family members not listed under the Exceptions: close family members section
  • boyfriend/girlfriend or fiancé;
  • EU/EEA citizens (including Nordic citizens) who are going to work or study in Norway, and who do not belong to any of the exceptions listed below
  • persons who have been granted a residence permit to work or study in Norway and who are not already resident here
  • business travellers
  • foreigners who have been granted a Schengen visa, but who do not belong to any of the exceptions below
  • persons who have leisure property in Norway, but are not resident here

Some of the exceptions:

  • foreigners residing in Norway
  • foreigners who have been granted a family immigration permit
  • foreigners who will visit or live with close family members in Norway
  • spouse or registered partner
  • foreigners who are going to have scheduled contact with their children
  • journalists and other personnel on behalf of a foreign media institution
  • foreigners who are going to stopover at an airport in Norway (both in international airport transit and within Schengen)

Complete list of exceptions (UDI.no)

If you are allowed to enter Norway, you must keep the following in mind:

Vaccination does not currently affect quarantine requirements or test recommendations.

From 9 May 2021, travellers who have stayed in countries outside the EU / Schengen area, including those who are resident in Norway, must go to a quarantine hotel upon arrival in Norway. This applies regardless of whether the trip was essential or not. Travellers can be released from quarantine if they test negative for COVID-19 with PCR (not rapid antigen test) no earlier than 7 days after arrival.

Travellers coming from high-risk areas must provide a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test taken less than 24 hours before entry. The certificate must be in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, French or German. Foreign nationals who cannot document a negative Covid-19 test upon arrival can be refused entry to Norway. This requirement does not apply to Norwegians, people living in Norway, people in transit or people who frequently cross the border from Sweden and Finland for work purposes.

Travellers from Bangladesh, India, Iraq, Nepal, and Pakistan are subject to stricter rules.

Additional Travel Documentation

Everyone travelling to Norway must complete the registration form prior to crossing the border. This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

After completing the digital registration, you will receive a receipt which you must then present to the police at the border control. You cannot register your journey any earlier than 72 hours prior to the time of arrival.

Find out more:
Entry rules (fhi.no)
Travel advice (helsenorge.no)

Internal Restrictions:

*New stricter COVID-19 mitigation measures: On January 23, the Norwegian government implemented stricter measures for 10 municipalities including: Enebakk, Frogn, Indre Ostfold, Moss, Nesodden, Nordre Follo, Oslo, Vestby, Valer and As. Please see the press release for more information. On January 24, the Norwegian government implemented stricter measures for 15 additional municipalities including: Asker, Aurskog-Holand, Bærum, Drammen, Horten, Lier, Lillestrom, Lunner, Lorenskog, Marker, Nittedal, Rakkestad, Rælingen, Rade og Skiptvet.

*Travel in Norway - The Norwegian Government regularly monitors the risk of coronavirus, and adjusts measures in line with the levels of infection to contain the spread of the virus. The current advice is to avoid all unnecessary domestic travel. See guidance available online from Helsenorge for the latest information. If you do travel, check the website of the municipality (kommune) you are visiting as restrictions and recommendations between regions can vary. See also the Norwegian Government’s coronavirus website for more detail.

*Public spaces and services: Social distancing guidance remains in force. There are restrictions on public events and large parts of the hospitality and service sectors. Establishments serving food are allowed to open but social distancing restrictions apply. The Norwegian authorities have issued recommendations that people avoid using public transport unless strictly necessary. For the latest guidance, including on wearing masks, visit the Norwegian Institute of Public Health website *Restrictions and recommendations do vary between regions. Check the website of the relevant municipality (kommune) for the latest guidance. You can sign up for official email alerts providing the latest information from the Norwegian government

06.11.2020

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between 05 November 2020 to TBD

New national restrictions have been announced on 5 November 2020. Further recommendations were also added. The government is adding several measures that municipalities in residential and working regions with high infection pressure should consider introducing. The Norwegian Directorate of Health and the National Institute of Public Health shall assess exactly which measures are relevant in different regions in the country, so that it is clear which measures are necessary to assess when the infection situation develops. Municipalities in a living and working region that introduce measures should do as much as possible and coordinated as possible. UPDATE 7 May 2020: Quarantine changes from 14 to 10 days. People who have been in close contact for up to 48 hours before a confirmed infected person had the first symptoms should be quarantined. Quarantine will continue if you have been in contact with infected persons less than two meters away for more than 15 minutes. Exemptions from the quarantine obligation for six months are granted for persons who have undergone infection with SARS-CoV-2. Employers should ensure that employees can keep a distance of at least one meter throughout working hours. In areas of the country where employees are dependent on public transport, employers are encouraged to facilitate home office and electronic meeting activities as much as possible. This is especially true in the Oslo area and in other cities with pressure in public transport. UPDATE 30 March 2020: A number of measures regulating work hours have been changed, allowing for staff in critical positions, e.g., health-staff, to be exempt from normal regulations. Economic incentives are being implemented. UPDATE 26 March 2020: Government of Norway has announced a shift in policy from trying to contain the virus to trying to beat it. The difference is subtle and will not be noticeable in the short term. For the long term however, it may include some form of restrictions for a period of up to 18 months until a sufficient number of the population are immune or vaccinated. The parliament have given the Government additional powers to bypass normal procedures for passing of legislation, giving the Government powers that normally would belong to the Parliament. They have literally set aside the democratic principle of trias politica, separation of powers, which is unprecedented in Norway. Municipalities should make sure that necessary services aimed at ensuring health care for vulnerable groups, e.g., elderly, continues. This includes necessary health care that takes place in peoples’ homes may continue but precautions against contagion should be taken.