En De
Total doses
given
36.1M
People fully
vaccinated
12M
% Fully
vaccinated
68.32%
Masks
Not required
COVID-19 test
Not required
Quarantine
Not required
Passenger Locator Form
Not required
Health form
Not required
Vaccination
Not required
Visa
Visa not required for 30 countries
Permission
Not required
Pre-travel testing (vaccinated): None
Pre-travel testing (unvaccinated): None
Test on arrival (vaccinated): None
Test on arrival (unvaccinated): None

Latest News:

26.05.2021

Latest News: Dutch government removes entry restrictions for several countries (Schengen Visa Info, 18.05.2021).

International Restrictions:

*From within the EU:

The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common "EU Traffic Lights" map.

For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

Is a coronavirus test required?

If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

Is a quarantine required?

All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

Mandatory Travel Documentation

If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

Find out more:
Dutch government on COVID-19
Requirements for COVID-19 tests
FAQs about Tourism
Netherlandsworldwide.nl

Contact point:
Contact form


Documents you need to travel in Europe

Health cover for temporary stays *Transit:

If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

*From Third Countries:

If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

Is a coronavirus test required?

If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

Is a quarantine required?

You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

Mandatory Travel Documentation

If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

Find out more:
Dutch government on COVID-19

Internal Restrictions:

*Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to avoid crowds and to travel outside peak hours if taking public transport where possible. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.

*Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.

*Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam - Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.

-P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.

-Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and onboard trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.

*Public Spaces and Services: A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between 6am and 8pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Zoos, amusement parks and other outdoor public spaces will be open as of 19 May 2021, with restrictions. Libraries and gyms will also reopen as of 19 May. Most other indoor public spaces such as museums, cinemas and theatres remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).

Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.

Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.

You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

*Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but room service is unavailable and meals can only be served outdoors between 6am and 8pm if the hotel restaurant has an outdoor seating area.

11.06.2020

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD