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Norway travel restrictions

Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates

25.06.2020 Norwegian last week announced planned operation for the month of July 2020, including service resumption on various European routes. For the month of July 2020, the airline schedules 758 weekly flights, all operated by Norwegian Air Shuttle (DY) Boeing 737-800 aircraft.

Bergen – Alicante 1 weekly
Bergen – Harstad-Narvik 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Aalborg 19 weekly
Copenhagen – Alicante 3 weekly
Copenhagen – Amsterdam 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Barcelona 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Berlin Schoenefeld 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Budapest 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Chania 1 weekly
Copenhagen – Edinburgh 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Krakow 2 weekly
Copenhagen – London Gatwick 6 weekly
Copenhagen – Malaga 4 weekly
Copenhagen – Munich 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Nice 3 weekly
Copenhagen – Oslo 7 weekly
Copenhagen – Palma Mallorca 2 weekly
Copenhagen – Split 1 weekly
Copenhagen – Stockholm Arlanda 6 weekly
Oslo – Alesund 10 weekly
Oslo – Alicante 7 weekly
Oslo – Alta 6 weekly
Oslo – Amsterdam 2 weekly
Oslo – Andenes 2 weekly
Oslo – Antalya 2 weekly
Oslo – Barcelona 3 weekly
Oslo – Belgrade 1 weekly
Oslo – Bergen 29 weekly
Oslo – Berlin Schoenefeld 3 weekly
Oslo – Billund 4 weekly
Oslo – Bodo 13 weekly
Oslo – Budapest 2 weekly
Oslo – Chania 2 weekly
Oslo – Copenhagen 7 weekly
Oslo – Dubrovnik 2 weekly
Oslo – Edinburgh 2 weekly
Oslo – Faro 1 weekly
Oslo – Gdansk 2 weekly
Oslo – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 1 weekly
Oslo – Hamburg 2 weekly
Oslo – Harstad-Narvik 19 weekly
Oslo – Haugesund 6 weekly
Oslo – Helsinki 3 weekly
Oslo – Kirkenes 6 weekly
Oslo – Krakow 2 weekly
Oslo – Kristiansand 6 weekly
Oslo – London Gatwick 7 weekly
Oslo – Malaga 7 weekly
Oslo – Molde 6 weekly
Oslo – Munich 2 weekly
Oslo – Nice 2 weekly
Oslo – Palanga 2 weekly
Oslo – Palma Mallorca 2 weekly
Oslo – Paris CDG 3 weekly
Oslo – Prague 2 weekly
Oslo – Prishtina 1 weekly
Oslo – Reykjavik Keflavik 2 weekly
Oslo – Riga 2 weekly
Oslo – Split 2 weekly
Oslo – Stavanger 25 weekly
Oslo – Stockholm Arlanda 7 weekly
Oslo – Tallinn 2 weekly
Oslo – Tromso 18 weekly
Oslo – Trondheim 28 weekly
Oslo – Vilnius 2 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Alicante 3 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Barcelona 2 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Chania 1 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Helsinki 7 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Lulea 11 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Malaga 4 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Nice 3 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Palma Mallorca 1 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Split 1 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Umea 11 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Visby 2 weekly
Tromso – Longyearbyen 3 weekly
Trondheim – Bergen 2 weekly

Selected service may be operated by Norwegian Air Sweden aircraft.

Published on 25.06.2020
WiderΓΈe adds Bergen – London Southend service from late-Aug 2020

17/06/2020
Norwegian Air will resume 76 routes within Europe as of July 1, 2020, using a total of 20 aircraft.

Published on 16.06.2020
Norwegian Air to resume first route outside Norway after lockdown

Published on 21.05.2020
WiderΓΈe schedules new routes June – Aug 2020

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Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 20 April 2020 to TBD

From 15 March the Government approved a law which make it forbidden to stay in cabins or other holiday homes outside your own municipality. From 20 April it was allowed to stay in cabins and holiday homes outside your own municipality again.

As of March 24, people are encouraged to stay less than 5 people in a group and a minimum of 2 meters when indoor. One should avoid un-necessary travels and especially with public transport. Home quarantine for 14 days for confirmed and suspected infected and for those in contact with them.

One should avoid un-necessary travels and especially with public transport if possible. Public transport is open because staff in critical functions may need it. All health-institutions should implement access-control and visitors who may be infected will be turned away.

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 12 March 2020 to TBD

The ban on travel abroad for health professionals is lifted. International travel is still not advised. Persons who have been abroad must quarantine upon return. The population must be prepared for the travel quarantine to last over the summer. As of 15 June travel to/from Denmark can be done without a quarantine upon return.

All Norwegians travelling abroad are encouraged to return home as soon as possible. Travelers without legal stay in Norway will be stopped at the borders and asked to return. EU citizens who cannot prove that they are staying in Norway will still be allowed to entry if they declare a legitimate purpose. National guard has been mobilized to support police doing border-control (unarmed).

For people coming from outside Nordic countries it is compulsory to stay quarantined at home for 14 days, regardless if they have symptoms or not. This applies from 27 February and counting from the day of arrival of the passenger. From 17 March this also applies to the Nordic countries. Exemptions are made for those who live in one country and work in another, and also for divorced parents who have to cross a border to be with their children.

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Flight Restrictions

published 16.06.2020
1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
– This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark, Finland, Iceland or Gotland of Sweden.
– This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
– This does not apply to family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway.
– This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
– This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
– This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
– This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
– This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
– This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
– This does not apply to the following passengers:
passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
NATO staff with travel order;
passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
seamen in transit to or from ships;
professional transporters of goods;
media staff on duty;
cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 10 days.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark, Finland, Iceland or Gotland of Sweden.
3. Airline crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

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Quarantine

Anyone that has traveled outside Norway in the past 14 days must follow home quarantine procedures.

Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.

From July 15th you may enter this country without a medical certificate or a negative test

Vaccination

Yellow fever (2016)
Country requirement at entry: no
WHO vaccination recommendation: no

Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 12 March 2020 to TBD

All service-sector establishments like training centres, swimming pools, places where food/beverages are served if the minimum distance of 1 m cannot be ensured among clients are closed. All other services can open from 27 April if they can meet new standards/criteria for contagion control.

Sports halls can open. There is a ban on the use of wardrobes in sports halls. As of 1st of June it opens up for organized swimming, including school swimming.

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 01 April 2020 to 01 September 2020

– Series games in top football will be allowed from June 16 as a separate exemption to the Covid-19 regulations.
– As of 15 June events for up to 200 people will open.
– As of 1st June amusement parks can open.
– As of 7 May 2020 events with up to 50 participants are allowed in a public place, where participants can keep at least 1-meter distance from each other and where there is a responsible organizer. This applies to all types of events.
– Sports-events: organized training will be permitted as long as recommendations for distancing and size of groups are followed (i.e. they can be carried out for up to 20 people who keep at least 1-meter distance).
– The recommended size of groups in private contexts is increased from five to a maximum of 20 persons, provided that one can keep at least 1-meter distance.

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Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 11 May 2020 to TBD

– Pupils in 5th-10th class (11 – 16 years) and high school start school again as of Monday May 11, 2020;
– Kindergartens opened 20 April, but those who need more time can stay closed;
– Children from age 6-10 returned to school, including after-school services, from 27 April 2020;
– The two highest levels of students in pre-university schools, age 17-18, opened 27 April 2020;
– Universities opened for students and employees who are in the final phase of their studies and dependent on material/equipment at the learning-facility on 27 April 2020

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Other

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD

UPDATE 7 May 2020:
Quarantine changes from 14 to 10 days. People who have been in close contact for up to 48 hours before a confirmed infected person had the first symptoms should be quarantined. Quarantine will continue if you have been in contact with infected persons less than two meters away for more than 15 minutes. Exemptions from the quarantine obligation for six months are granted for persons who have undergone infection with SARS-CoV-2.

Employers should ensure that employees can keep a distance of at least one meter throughout working hours. In areas of the country where employees are dependent on public transport, employers are encouraged to facilitate home office and electronic meeting activities as much as possible. This is especially true in the Oslo area and in other cities with pressure in public transport.

UPDATE 30 March 2020:
A number of measures regulating work hours have been changed, allowing for staff in critical positions, e.g., health-staff, to be exempt from normal regulations. Economic incentives are being implemented.

UPDATE 26 March 2020: Government of Norway has announced a shift in policy from trying to contain the virus to trying to beat it. The difference is subtle and will not be noticeable in the short term. For the long term however, it may include some form of restrictions for a period of up to 18 months until a sufficient number of the population are immune or vaccinated.

The parliament have given the Government additional powers to bypass normal procedures for passing of legislation, giving the Government powers that normally would belong to the Parliament. They have literally set aside the democratic principle of trias politica, separation of powers, which is unprecedented in Norway.

Municipalities should make sure that necessary services aimed at ensuring health care for vulnerable groups, e.g., elderly, continues. This includes necessary health care that takes place in peoples’ homes may continue but precautions against contagion should be taken.

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  • Norway Norway will lift travel restrictions to and from European countries that respect certain criteria regarding their COVID-19 situation from 15 July. (Reuters, 25.06.2020). Norway currently allows travel to and from Finland, Iceland and the Swedish island of Gotland as of June 15, but is maintaining existing travel restrictions imposed on mainland Sweden due to its higher level of COVID-19 cases. (Reuters, 12.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Norway has been applying entry restrictions since March 16th, which will be lifted towards Schengen and EEA countries as from 15 July, provided that the country meets the criteria for level of infection as descried by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH). For now the borders are closed for non-Norwegian citizens who do not reside in Norway or do not have a valid reason to enter Norway. Travellers from the Nordic countries, except from Sweden, can freely entre Norway if the country meets the criteria for level of infection as descried by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH). The situation is regularly reassessed, and adaptations of this regime are possible if the epidemiological situation requires it. Norway does not apply any restrictions to travellers departing from the country.
    Travelers from the Nordic countries, except from Sweden, may transit. From July 15th transit is possible for citizens of Schengen and EEA countries, provided that the country meets the criteria for level of infection as descried by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH).
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    From Monday 20 April, Norway began easing some restrictions. This included re-opening nurseries, schools, and businesses such as hairdressers. A further lifting of restrictions was announced on 7 May, which included a reduction in the quarantine period for arrivals into Norway to 10 days.
    Details on what the new rules allow and timings are available on the Norwegian Government’s coronavirus website [https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/norway-to-lift-covid-19-restrictions-gradually-and-cautiously/id2697060/]. Social distancing guidance remains in force. There are restrictions on public events and large parts of the hospitality and service sectors. Pubs and nightclubs are required to close. Establishments serving food are allowed to open but social distancing restrictions apply. The Norwegian authorities have issued recommendations that people avoid using public transport unless strictly necessary. You can sign up for official email alerts providing the latest information from the Norwegian government [https://www.regjeringen.no/en/topics/koronavirus-covid-19/id2692388/].

    Read more
    03.07.2020
  • Norway Norway will lift travel restrictions to and from European countries that respect certain criteria regarding their COVID-19 situation from 15 July. (Reuters, 25.06.2020)

    Norway currently allows travel to and from Finland, Iceland and the Swedish island of Gotland as of June 15, but is maintaining existing travel restrictions imposed on mainland Sweden due to its higher level of COVID-19 cases. (Reuters, 12.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway. This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway, passengers arriving from Denmark, Finland, Iceland or Gotland of Sweden, nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    Family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway are allowed to enter.

    Transiting passengers via Norway to return to their country of residence are also allowed. This does not apply to: nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport.
    Also excluded fom transit are: passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020, visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    The following categories of passengers are allowed to enter:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
    holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
    foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
    Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed. Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least. Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    *****Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June. From Monday 20 April, Norway began easing some restrictions. This included re-opening nurseries, schools, and businesses such as hairdressers. A further lifting of restrictions was announced on 7 May, which included a reduction in the quarantine period for arrivals into Norway to 10 days. Details on what the new rules allow and timings are available on the Norwegian Goverment website [https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/norway-to-lift-covid-19-restrictions-gradually-and-cautiously/id2697060/]

    Read more
    25.06.2020
  • Norway Norway will allow travel to and from Finland, Iceland and the Swedish island of Gotland from June 15, but is maintaining existing travel restrictions imposed on mainland Sweden due to its higher level of COVID-19 cases. (Reuters, 12.06.2020)

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark, Finland, Iceland or Gotland of Sweden.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    – This does not apply to family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
    – This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
    – This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    – This does not apply to the following passengers:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
    holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
    foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
    2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 10 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark, Finland, Iceland or Gotland of Sweden.
    3. Airline crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
    4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed. Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least. Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    *****Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June. From Monday 20 April, Norway began easing some restrictions. This included re-opening nurseries, schools, and businesses such as hairdressers. A further lifting of restrictions was announced on 7 May, which included a reduction in the quarantine period for arrivals into Norway to 10 days. Details on what the new rules allow and timings are available on the Norwegian Goverment website [https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/norway-to-lift-covid-19-restrictions-gradually-and-cautiously/id2697060/]

    Read more
    16.06.2020
  • Norway Norway will allow travel to and from Finland, Iceland and the Swedish island of Gotland from June 15, but is maintaining existing travel restrictions imposed on mainland Sweden due to its higher level of COVID-19 cases. (Reuters, 12.06.2020)

    Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to:
    – nationals of Finland and their family members;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Finland;
    – nationals and family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland residing in Finland or returning via Finland to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members residing in Finland or returning via Finland to their country of residence;
    – residents of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or the United Kingdom, returning via Finland to their country of residence;
    – passengers traveling for work or commission-related commuting, if arriving from another EU or Schengen Member State;
    – passengers studying in Finland, if arriving from another EU or Schengen Member State;
    – healthcare and rescue service professionals/personnel, health researchers, and elderly care professionals;
    – transport personnel and other transport staff to the extent necessary;
    – workers, who based on permanent employee relationship work daily in another country and returns back to the country of residence at least once a week, taking into consideration local circumstances and natural travel-to-work area;
    – diplomats, staff of international organizations, military personnel and personnel of aid organizations in duty;
    – necessary transit and returns;
    – passengers travelling for imperative family reasons;
    – persons in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons;
    – other necessary and justified traffic, e.g. imperative personal reasons, maintenance personnel of work which cannot be postponed;
    – effective 15 June 2020, passengers arriving from Denmark, Estonia, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania or Norway.

    On May 29, the Norwegian government announced that routine travel between Norway and Denmark will be allowed without quarantine starting June 15 (OSAC, 03.06.2020)

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed.
    Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least.
    Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June.
    Gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-metre distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    14.06.2020
  • Norway Norway will allow travel to and from Finland, Iceland and the Swedish island of Gotland from June 15, but is maintaining existing travel restrictions imposed on mainland Sweden due to its higher level of COVID-19 cases. (Reuters, 12.06.2020)

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    – This does not apply to family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
    – This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
    – Effective 15 June 2020, this does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark.
    – This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    – This does not apply to the following passengers:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
    holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
    foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
    2. The following passengers must undergo a 10-day home quarantine:
    – nationals and residents of Norway;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and passengers with a British passport if they are residing or working in Norway;
    – passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    3. Airline crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
    4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    On May 29, the Norwegian government announced that routine travel between Norway and Denmark will be allowed without quarantine starting June 15 (OSAC, 03.06.2020)

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed.
    Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least.
    Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June.
    Gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-metre distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    12.06.2020
  • Norway 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    – This does not apply to family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
    – This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
    – Effective 15 June 2020, this does not apply to passengers arriving from Denmark.
    – This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    – This does not apply to the following passengers:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
    holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
    foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
    2. The following passengers must undergo a 10-day home quarantine:
    – nationals and residents of Norway;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and passengers with a British passport if they are residing or working in Norway;
    – passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    3. Airline crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
    4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    On May 29, the Norwegian government announced that routine travel between Norway and Denmark will be allowed without quarantine starting June 15 (OSAC, 03.06.2020)

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed.
    Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least.
    Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June.
    Gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-metre distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    08.06.2020
  • Norway 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they reside, work or have property in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    – This does not apply to family members of nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport, if they are already residing in Norway or are moving to Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
    – This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
    – This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    – This does not apply to the following passengers:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers carrying work trips throughout Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home;
    holders of seasonal work permits in farming with an approval letter from UDI;
    foreigners who are either part or witness in a court case are permitted to enter Norway for the court case. They will have a summons from the court with the date and their duty to appear.
    2. The following passengers must undergo a 10-day home quarantine:
    – nationals and residents of Norway;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and passengers with a British passport if they are residing or working in Norway;
    – passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    3. Airline crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
    4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    On May 29, the Norwegian government announced that routine travel between Norway and Denmark will be allowed without quarantine starting June 15 (OSAC, 03.06.2020)

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed.
    Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least.
    Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only.

    Relaxation in restrictions:
    All airports will reopen on 1 June.
    Gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-metre distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    02.06.2020
  • Norway

    International restrictions:

    Foreign nationals who don’t have a residence permit will be turned away at the border. EEA citizens on essential or work related travel are are exempt of the restriction but are required to provide proof of: A contract with a Norwegian employer or, A contract with a EU/EEA company and a letter proving to have been assigned in Norway or, Being self-employed and on an assignment to Norway. Inbound travellers face a mandatory ten-day home quarantine, regardless of symptoms or nationality. All airports and ports in Norway have stopped normal operations and international flight options remain limited. Internal border controls are in place until 13 August. Border control at ports which have ferry connections with Denmark, Germany and Sweden are in place until 12 November, notably due to terrorist threats.

    Internal restrictions:

    Bars, restaurants and all entertainment venues remain closed. Gatherings above 50 people are prohibited, including major sports and cultural events until 15 June at least. Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only. Relaxation in restrictions All airports will reopen on 1 June. Gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-metre distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    21.05.2020
  • Norway

    International restrictions:

    Inbound travellers face a mandatory 14-day home quarantine, regardless of symptoms or nationality (exceptions below). All airports and ports in Norway have stopped normal operations and international flight options remain limited. Norway has eased some of its border restrictions with Schengen. EEA-citizens are allowed back in for essential family and work reasons (see below), they will face a ten-day quarantine period, instead of a 14-day period. Border control at ports which have ferry connections with Denmark, Germany and Sweden are in place until 12 November, notably due to terrorist threats.

    Internal restrictions:

    Educational facilities, bars, restaurants and all social events are closed. Major sports and cultural events such as festivals are prohibited until 15 June at least. Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only. Internal border controls are in place until 13 August. For Norway’s national day celebration β€˜syttende mai’ public gatherings of up to 50 people are allowed, and private parties up to 20 people if practicing good social distancing. Relaxation in restrictions: EEA citizens are allowed to enter the country for work but are required to provide proof of: A contract with a Norwegian employer or, A contract with a EU/EEA company and a letter proving to have been assigned in Norway or, Being self-employed and on an assignment to Norway. Schools are starting to reopen. Citizens are allowed to travel inside the country to reach their secondary residence/chalets. As of 7 May, gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-meter distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    18.05.2020
  • Norway Passengers are not allowed to enter Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Norway.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they are residing or working in Norway. If they cannot prove their residency in Norway, they must be able to prove their nationality in one of the countries listed above.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and passengers with a British passport if they are transiting via Norway to return to their country of residence.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Norway after 15 March 2020.
    – This does not apply to visa exempt nationals who have been granted a residence permit, but have not yet received the residence card (a letter from UDI with the approval of the residence permit will document that the permit has been granted). This also goes for family members of EEA citizens who have been granted a residence card, but the card has not been issued yet.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a D-visa in their passport.
    – This does not apply to spouses/cohabitants and children of holders of Norwegian diplomatic passport.
    – This does not apply to airline crew.
    – This does not apply to passengers in transit.
    – This does not apply to passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    – This does not apply to the following passengers:
    passengers with a diplomatic or service passport when they are accredited to Norway;
    passengers with an ID card as diplomat or a Schengen residence card issued to diplomatic staff;
    transit workers to oil platforms and similar;
    NATO staff with travel order;
    passengers with a valid flight certificate on duty;
    seamen in transit to or from ships;
    professional transporters of goods;
    media staff on duty;
    cruise passengers on cruises that started before 16 March 0800 CET transiting Norway to return home.
    2. The following passengers must undergo a 14-day home quarantine:
    – nationals and residents of Norway;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and passengers with a British passport if they are residing or working in Norway;
    – passengers who have a particular responsibility to care for residents of Norway or who have strong welfare reasons.
    3. All crew and passengers must fill out the public health information form and hand it over to the local airport authority upon arrival.
    4. Passengers are only allowed to travel to Svalbard after they have stayed in quarantined in other parts of Norway.

    Norway has extended the temporary reintroduction of its border controls on the Schengen border until16 May at least. It has also extended border controls until 12 November with ports which have ferry connections with Denmark, Germany and Sweden, Norway has extended border controls for those until November 12, notably due to terrorist threats.

    Internal restrictions:

    Educational facilities, bars, restaurants and all social events are closed. Internal border controls are in place until 13 August. Major sports and cultural events such as festivals are prohibited until 15 June at least. Internal flights will continue to operate. Travel within Norway should be for essential purposes only. Norwegian authorities have decided to extend the internal border controls which were set to expire on 15 April, for another 20 days. If the situation does not improve for the better by May 5, when the border controls are set to expire, the government will prolong them for an extra 20 days in the context of cases requiring immediate action.

    Relaxation in restrictions: EEA citizens are allowed to enter the country for work but are required to provide proof of: a contract with a Norwegian employer or, a contract with a EU/EEA company and a letter proving to have been assigned in Norway or, Being self-employed and on an assignment to Norway. Schools are starting to reopen. Citizens are allowed to travel inside the country to reach their secondary residence/chalets. As of 7 May, gatherings up to 50 people in public areas are authorised – under the conditions of a one-meter distance measure and with a manager in charge.

    Read more
    09.05.2020
  • Source [https://no.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/]
    [https://reopen.europa.eu/en/map/NOR]
    [https://pandemic.internationalsos.com/2019-ncov/ncov-travel-restrictions-flight-operations-and-screening]
    [https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice]
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