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Switzerland travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -118.53%
Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates
Published on 23.09.2021, SWISS:

SWISS offers 90 destinations, reinstates Geneva-New York route in its winter schedules

Published on 16.08.2021, SWISS:

SWISS connecting Sri Lanka with Europe again

Published on 16.08.2021, SWISS:

SWISS to commence Zurich-Colombo, Sri Lanka flights twice weekly from 04NOV21.

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Switzerland
Crossing Rules

Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers with a D visa issued by Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers with proof of being spouses, registered partners, children under 21 years, grandchildren under 21 years, dependent children, dependent grandchildren, dependent parents or dependent grandparents of residents of Switzerland who are passengers with “British Citizens” passports , “British Overseas Territories Citizens” passports issued by Gibraltar and “British Subjects” passports with a Certificate of Entitlement to the Right of Abode issued by the United Kingdom.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Schengen Member States.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Andorra, Australia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland (Rep.), Korea (Rep.), Monaco, New Zealand, Romania, Rwanda, San Marino, Singapore, Thailand and Vatican City (Holy See). If they transit through other countries, they must stay in the international transit area of the airport.
– This does not apply to spouses, registered partners, children under 21 years, grandchildren under 21 years, dependent children, dependent grandchildren, dependent parents or dependent grandparents of nationals of EEA Member States. They must present proof of their relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers with a Schengen C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020.
– This does not apply to unmarried partners of residents of Switzerland. They must have a written invitation from the residents in Switzerland and present proof of their relationship.

Passengers must have a medical certificate with:
– a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) PCR test result. The test must have been taken at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point; or
– a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) Rapid Antigen test result. The test must have been taken at most 24 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. They could be subject to a Coronavirus (COVID-19) test upon arrival.
— This does not apply to passengers younger than 12 years.
— This does not apply to passengers with a medical certificate with a positive Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result of a test taken in the past 3 months. They must also have a medical discharge.
— More exemptions can be found at https://tinyurl.com/2xllqfnn .

Passengers must:
– provide the contact details electronically at https://swissplf.admin.ch/home ; or
– complete the “Contact Tracing Card” form. The form is available at https://static.vueling.com/corporative7/media/1647/swiss_authority_arriving_passenger_contact_tracing_card-pd.pdf or on board.

Quarantine is possible
Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 days. A list of quarantine exemptions can be found at https://www.bag.admin.ch/bag/en/home/krankheiten/ausbrueche-epidemien-pandemien/aktuelle-ausbrueche-epidemien/novel-cov/empfehlungen-fuer-reisende/quarantaene-einreisende.html .

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Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 06 June 2020 to TBD

On 17 March (Swiss Government): recommendation to all citizens to stay at home, especially the elderly and people at risk. Mandatory only in Ticino from 22 March to 13 April for people at risk and over the age of 65.
The Federal Council gradually began to ease these measures, starting from 27 Apr, as long as certain precautionary measures are respected to protect the health of the population, particularly of those at especially high risk.

As of 1 June, the Swiss government still recommended to stay at home, whenever possible, for the people over the age of 65 or with an underlying medical condition, and, if possible, work from home.

As of 22 June, the Swiss government recommends that the people over the age of 65 and those with an underlying medical condition should avoid places where there are likely to be large numbers of people and peak times.

From 6 July, masks compulsory in all public transports (trains, trams and buses, mountain rail and cableways, lake and river boats) nationwide for all people over the age of 12.

From 15 August, masks compulsory also on planes.
In addition, it is recommended to wear a face mask if you are unable to maintain a distance of 1.5 m from other people, and where no physical barrier is in place.
However, as of 9 Oct, in several Swiss Cantons (e.g. TI, GE, …) it is mandatory to wear a face mask in the shops and for the people working in bars, restaurants, etc.

From 19 Oct, it is mandatory to wear a mask in all the mandatory in all publicly accessible indoor spaces and at all public transport access points (e.g. restaurants, shops, theaters, railway stations, airports, bus and tram stops). In addition, there is a mask-wearing requirement at all private events with more than 15 people, while spontaneous gatherings of more than 15 people in public spaces are not permitted since 19 Oct.
In addition, from 19 Oct, the Swiss government is recommending people to work from home.

From 29 Oct new measures: extended obligation to wear a face mask (measure of 6 July and 19 Oct still valid, new: at school from upper secondary level, working indoor if no distance, outside entrance areas if restaurants, shops, busy pedestrian zones, public space when it is not possible to keep the distance). Exceptions: children under the age of 12 and persons with a medical certificate.
In addition, the government recommend to work from home if possible, reduce contact with other people, wash hands regularly and keep the distance.

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 13 March 2020 to TBD

– From 16 March to 14 June 2020: Border checks with Italy, Germany, Austria and France (starting from 16 March 2020), extended to all Schengen and non-Schengen states (starting from 25 March; except in Ticino: starting from 13 March). Entry to Switzerland only possible for Swiss citizens, persons holding a residence permit and for work-related reasons.

– From 15 June: Borders to all EU/EFTA states and UK reopened.

– From 6 July: Quarantine for 10 days for travelers arriving in Switzerland from countries or regions with high risk of infections (see the list regularly updated on FOPH website).

– From 14 Sep: The Swiss Federal Council has adopted a regional approach for the list of countries and areas with a high risk of infection (decision of 11 Sep): only individual regions from neighbouring countries that exceed the threshold can be added to this list and the border regions are currently exempt. In addition also the following groups of people are now exempt from mandatory quarantine: cultural figures following a cultural event, athletes following a competition, participants in specialist congresses (note: precautionary measures in place for the event outside Switzerland); as well as the individuals who for professional or medical reasons have to travel to a risk country for a reason that cannot be postponed (note: no more than five days and precautionary measures in place).

– From 29 Oct: new updated list of countries (using different thresholds: “The new infections per 100 000 inhabitants over the past 14 days are examined to determine whether a country or an area has an increased risk of infection, If the incidence in a country is at least 60 higher than the incidence in Switzerland, the country will be added to the list”)

FOPH, List of the areas: https://www.bag.admin.ch/bag/en/home/krankheiten/ausbrueche-epidemien-pandemien/aktuelle-ausbrueche-epidemien/novel-cov/empfehlungen-fuer-reisende/quarantaene-einreisende.html

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Flight Restrictions

published 27.11.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Schengen Member States.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Andorra, Australia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland (Rep.), Japan, Korea (Rep.), Monaco, New Zealand, Romania, Rwanda, San Marino, Singapore, Thailand, Uruguay and Vatican City (Holy See). If they transit through other countries, they must stay in the international transit area of the airport.
– This does not apply to spouses, registered partners, children under 21 years, grandchildren under 21 years, dependent children, dependent grandchildren, dependent parents or dependent grandparents of nationals of EEA Member States. They must present proof of their relationship.
– This does not apply to spouses, registered partners, children under 21 years, grandchildren under 21 years, dependent children, dependent grandchildren, dependent parents or dependent grandparents of British nationals. They must present proof of their relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers with a D visa issued by Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers with a Schengen C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020.
– This does not apply to unmarried partners of residents of Switzerland. They must have a written invitation from the residents in Switzerland and present proof of their relationship.

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Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation.
Holders of EUDCC who have not been vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19 and who have been in a country or area with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland. The quarantine requirement also applies to children even if the parents are fully vaccinated. There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.
Travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland. The quarantine requirement also applies to children– even if the parents are fully vaccinated. There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.
– Entry from non high-risk countries. In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction: full vaccination against COVID-19, with the last dose taken no earlier than 6 months ago; recovery from COVID-19 within 6 months from the end of the isolation period. Travellers arriving by air are always subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (rapid antigen tests are not accepted). Children under 16 years old are exempted.

– Entry from high-risk countries. In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction: full vaccination against COVID-19, with the last dose taken no earlier than 6 months ago; recovery from COVID-19 within 6 months from the end of the isolation period. The other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.
– Entry from countries with a variant of concern: All travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an area of concern, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 12 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.
Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19). The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).

If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:
• You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air, including stopover and transit;
• You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.

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Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.
Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases: if they are entering Switzerland by airplane; if they have been, within the last 10 days before entering Switzerland, in a country with a variant of concern.
– Entry from non high-risk countries. In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction: full vaccination against COVID-19, with the last dose taken no earlier than 6 months ago; recovery from COVID-19 within 6 months from the end of the isolation period. Travellers arriving by air are always subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (rapid antigen tests are not accepted). Children under 16 years old are exempted.

– Entry from high-risk countries. In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction: full vaccination against COVID-19, with the last dose taken no earlier than 6 months ago; recovery from COVID-19 within 6 months from the end of the isolation period. The other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.
– Entry from countries with a variant of concern: All travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an area of concern, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 12 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement. Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19). The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).

If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:
• You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air, including stopover and transit;
• You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.

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Vaccination
COVID-19 Total Vaccination date: 2021-09-26
COVID-19 Total Vaccination: 10330401
COVID-19 Daily Vaccination: 27173
COVID-19 Vacc. (per 100 citizens, %): 118.53
COVID-19 Daily Vacc. (per 1 million citizens): 3118

The EU Digital COVID Certificate (available as of 1 July 2021) provides proof that a person has either:
Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:
is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.
The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.
Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information: the date of vaccination; the vaccine used; been vaccinated against COVID-19 (vaccine type and manufacturer, number of doses, date of vaccination);
received a negative test result, PCR or rapid antigen, with the name of the test, date and time of test, test centre and result (self-tests are not valid);
recovered from COVID-19 (positive PCR test result valid for 180 days).
When travelling, holders of the EU Digital COVID Certificate will have the same rights as citizens of the visited Member State who have been vaccinated, tested or recovered.

Rules to enter this country from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country: If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:
• You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight;
• You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.
Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19).
The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).
Rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country:
Travellers do NOT have to fill out the pre-travel clearance form if they are entering from states or areas of low epidemiological risk, carry proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result according to the below requirements, and have not stayed in any other state or area than those of low epidemiological risk or Austria in the past 10 days.
Travellers DO have to fill out the pre-travel clearance form if they cannot provide such proof or have stayed in a state or area other than those of low epidemiological risk or Austria in the past 10 days.

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Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 29 October 2020 to TBD

– 27 April: DIY stores, garden centres, florists, hairdressers, tattoo studios and beauty salons, self-service facilities (e.g. car washes), as well as medical and dental practices, physiotherapy and massage practices. Precautionary measures in place.

– 11 May: all non-essential shops and markets, museums, libraries, sports facilities and restaurants can reopen as long as precautionary measures are applied. Limitations in place: archives (excl. reading rooms), sports facilities ONLY those with precautionary measures, restaurants bars and pubs for groups of up to 4 people and families with children.

– 6 June: zoos, botanic gardens, cinemas and theaters, summer tourism businesses and services, swimming pools (open to the public), mountain transport. Precautionary measures required.

– 22 June: no more restrictions on opening hours for restaurants, bars, etc.

– As of 1 Sep: all shops are open with precautionary measures in place, but a number of Swiss Cantons have closed night discos/dance halls since Aug-Sept (e.g. GE: 31 Jul, TI: 9 Oct).

– 29 Oct new measures: closure of night discos/dance, new measures for bars and restaurants (no more than 4 people per table, curfew from 23:00 to 6:00, consumption only when seated and recording of contact details), extended obligation to wear a face mask.

NOTE: additional measures valid in certain cantons

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 19 October 2020 to TBD

The Federal Council has banned all public and private events, including also sporting events and club activities, from 13 March to 11 May (max. of 100 people from 13 March, max. of 5 people from 20 March). Then these measures have been gradually lifted, except for the large events (>1000 people) that are still prohibited at least until 1 October (extended from 21 Aug to 1 Oct, as of 12 Aug).
However, starting from 19 June, after the end of the “Extraordinary” Situation (under the terms of the Epidemics Act), several Swiss Cantons have started implemented again regional measurements.

Open/permitted/started since:
– 11 May: certain events/establishment started/opened on condition that strict requirements are met: museums, libraries, archives (excl. reading rooms), sport as an individual or in groups of up to 5 people not involving physical contact, training sessions for competitive athletes, visits to restaurants, bars and pubs for groups of up to 4 people and families with children.
– 28 May: all forms of religious services/celebrations are permitted.
– 30 May: Gatherings of groups of up to 30 people (public spaces, parks)
– 6 June: Events and demonstrations with up to 300 people, sports training and competitions with up to 300 people (still prohibited: gatherings in public of groups of more than 30 people, events with more than 300 people and sport competitions involving physical contact).
– 22 June: Gatherings of groups of more than 30 people are permitted, as well as the events with more than 300 people (division in sectors each with 300 people). The Large-scale events (>1000 people) continue to be prohibited until 31 August. Sports competitions involving close physical contact are now permitted.
– 1 Oct: large-scale events (> 1,000 people) possible under strict conditions and must have a cantonal authorisation/permit. Conditions: Precautionary measures in place, epidemiological situation in the canton/region must allow for the event to be held, contact tracing system, allocated seating mandatory. In addition, for national ice hockey and football leagues: wear masks, allocated seating mandatory, capacity limits (max. 2/3 of seats may be occupied, no seats are available for away fans) and seating is compulsory in catering areas. However, a number of Swiss cantons have introduced additional measures for large events/gatherings.

New measures fro events/gatherings since:
– 19 Oct: max 15 people for spontaneous gatherings in public spaces; gatherings of family and friends 16-100 people: mandatory mask, contact details recorded, food and drink consumed seated only; 100 person or more: set of precautionary measures
– 29 Oct: no more than 10 people among friends and family, no events with more than 50 people, no gatherings of more than 15 people in public spaces (since 19 Oct), sporting and cultural activities with more than 15 people prohibited (exceptions: practice and training sessions for children up to age of 16 and professionals).

NOTE: additional measures valid in certain cantons

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Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 29 September 2020 to TBD

– 11 May: primary and secondary schools, classroom teaching of up to 5 students (upper secondary schools, higher education and other educational institutions), as well as driving school and language schools reopened with precautionary measures in place.

– 6 June: All the upper secondary schools, higher education and other educational institutions (without the limit of number of students, before the limit was 5 students) reopened with precautionary measures in place.

– Summer holidays: from 20 Jun-18 Jul to 10 – 31 Aug –> As of 1 Sep 2020: all primary and secondary schools and other educational institutions are open with precautionary measures in place.

– From 29 Oct: Distance learning at higher education institutions

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Other

Other: partially closed/partially cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between 19 June 2020 to TBD

– 19 June: The Federal Council has decided to downgrade the situation in Switzerland from “extraordinary ” (under the terms of the Epidemics Act) to “special” starting from 19 June. After this date, several Swiss Cantons have started implemented again regional measurements.
– 25 June: SwissCovid app available
– Social distancing: 1.5m
– Mask: From 6 July mandatory on public transport (including planes) and recommended if you are unable to maintain a distance of 1.5 m from other people, and where no physical barrier is in place. However, in several Swiss Cantons was mandatory for example in the shops and for the people working in bars, restaurants, etc. From 19 Oct, it is mandatory to wear a mask in all the mandatory in all publicly accessible indoor spaces and at all public transport access points (e.g. restaurants, shops, theaters, railway stations, airports, bus and tram stops). In addition, there is a mask-wearing requirement at all private events with more than 15 people. From 29 Oct new measures: extended obligation to wear a face mask (measure of 6 July and 19 Oct still valid, new: at school from upper secondary level, working indoor if no distance, outside entrance areas if restaurants, shops, busy pedestrian zones, public space when it is not possible to keep the distance. In addition, the government recommend to work from home if possible, reduce contact with other people, wash hands regularly and keep the distance.
– 19 Oct: working from home recommended

NOTE: additional measures valid in certain cantons

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Full Restrictions

  • Switzerland Non-vaccinated and unrecovered travellers reaching Switzerland are required to present a negative test performed before arrival and another one, carried out four to seven days upon arriving in the country, starting from Monday, September 20, the country’s authorities have announced.

    The decision has been determined in a bid to halt the further spread of COVID-19 as the autumn season vacations are approaching, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “Anyone who has not been vaccinated or has not recovered must present a negative test result (antigen or PCR) on entry into Switzerland, irrespective of where they are travelling from or by which means of transport, they are entering the country,” the press release issued by the Federal Council notes.

    Furthermore, regardless of the vaccination status, all travellers reaching Switzerland must complete SwissPLF, a Passenger Locator Form. The form allows the authorities to locate travellers residing in respective cantons and determine whether they have been tested on the fourth to seventh day upon arrival, as the law orders.

    However, travellers administered one of the vaccines approved by the Swiss medical authorities, those who tested positive for the virus in the last 30 days, as well as the EU Digital COVID-19 Certificate holders are permitted to enter the country free of entry quarantine or testing requirements.

    Read more
    21.09.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

    Entry into Switzerland is also possible without a Covid certificate, whereby the following entry conditions must be considered:

     

    Entering by car/coach/train:

    If you are travelling from a country or area without a variant of concern you can enter Switzerland without any further pandemic-related measures and you are therefore exempt from the test and quarantine requirement. For more info please fill the Travel check questionnaire.

     

    Entering by air:

    Test requirement

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Quarantine requirement

    Travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children– even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

     

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.If they continue their journey by train they have to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry.

     

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to other Schengen state
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to a third country
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to a state outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    Third-country citizens holding a residence document or a visa type D for their destination country in the Schengen area are permitted to travel through Switzerland to that country.
    The normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    It is only possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen state for a short stay of up to 90 days if you can prove that you have been vaccinated (see “How can I prove that I am vaccinated?”). Persons under 18 may enter Switzerland if they are travelling with an adult who has been vaccinated.
    Otherwise the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    If you have not been vaccinated, but your destination country in the Schengen area has authorised your entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, you may only enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to your destination country (i.e. you may not travel though Switzerland).

     

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen state, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
    Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry from non high-risk countries (as listed here)

    Entry to Switzerland is possible provided that the normal entry requirements are met when crossing the border (e.g. valid visa and travel document).

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    Entry from a high-risk country (that is not listed here) is possible if one of the following criteria, as well as the normal entry requirements are met:

    • You have Swiss citizenship.
    • You hold a travel document (e.g. a passport or identity card) and:
      • a Swiss residence permit (L B C Ci permit);
      • a cross-border permit (G permit),
      • an FDFA legitimation card;
      • a D visa issued by Switzerland;
      • a C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020 in a valid exceptional case or in order to work on a short-term contract;
      • an assurance of a residence permit
      • a confirmation of notification for the cross-border provision of services up to 90 days in any calendar year (e.g. UK nationals).
    • You hold a refugee’s or stateless person’s travel document issued by Switzerland, a passport for foreign nationals issued by Switzerland, a valid residence or permanent residence permit or an F-Permit.
    • You have rights of free movement. If you require a visa, a valid Schengen C-visa, a valid D-visa or a valid Schengen residence permit are sufficient.
    • You are in a situation of special necessity (see below). The border control authority will assess the necessity of the situation.
    • You can prove that they have been vaccinated with a recognised vaccine
    • You are under 18 and are travelling with an adult who has been fully vaccinated.
    • You are simply travelling directly through Switzerland with the intention and possibility of entering another country.

    You must be able to prove that you meet the abovementioned requirements. Suitable documentary proof must be produced at the border or when you apply for a visa.

    Find out more Information: Corona: Questions and answers on entry and stay in Switzerland, the exceptions and suspension of visas (admin.ch)

    Independent of the above-mentioned entry-requirements, health-related measures at the border may apply (see «What are the rules to enter this country from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?”)

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

     

    The entry form for incoming travellers can be found at swissplf.admin.ch.

    The form must be filled out by all travellers entering Switzerland by airplane. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight.

    The entry form must also be filled out for children. They can be included in the form of an adult travelling with them.

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

    In addition, travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people.

    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wearing a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport and when indoors in publicly accessible areas. Further information on masks is available on the Federal Office of Public Health website. Failure to wear a mask is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from a COVID-19 infection or a negative test result (up to 48 hours for a rapid antigen test or 72 hours for a PCR test) is required for entry into:
    • Large-scale outdoor events attended by over 1,000 people. Indoor hospitality venues including restaurants, bars, clubs and discos.
    • Cultural, sporting and leisure activities indoors. This includes museums and libraries, leisure facilities, zoos, casinos, fitness centres and sports facilities, indoor pools and water parks
    • Indoor events including theatre and cinema, concerts, sporting events and private events outside the home (e.g. weddings)
    Children under the age of 16 are exempt from this requirement.
    Further information is available from the
    Federal Office of Public Health. Cantons may imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    From 20 September to 10 October, foreign vaccination certificates, will be valid for access to events or facilities requiring a COVID certificate.
    Anyone who has been fully vaccinated outside of Switzerland with a vaccine authorised by the European Medicines Agency can obtain a Swiss COVID certificate. This includes the AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Moderna and Janssen vaccines. You need to apply to your canton of residence for this.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    17.09.2021
  • Switzerland Those who were vaccinated in third countries will have to test every three days in order to be able to attend indoor dining areas in Switzerland starting from Monday, but Switzerland Tourism (ST) says it is working towards an immediate solution in this regard.

    Starting from Monday, September 13, it will become mandatory for every person in Switzerland to hold a COVID-19 passport in order for the same to be able to attend indoor areas, as restaurants, cafeterias and more.

    The requirement of such a document also extends to tourists visiting the country for whatever purpose. However, if they have been vaccinated in countries outside of the European Union and the European Economic Area, their vaccination certificates will not be accepted. Instead, these travellers will have to test for COVID-19 every three days.

    The issue has been raised by Switzerland Tourism (ST), which is the national marketing organization promoting Switzerland worldwide as an attractive and diverse travel destination. According to ST, travellers from other countries will need a COVID-19 certificate even to enter the restaurant area of their hotel.

    “For meals in a (hotel) restaurant, guests from third countries who have been vaccinated and who have legally entered the country with a vaccination certificate must be tested every three days,” the organization says regarding the move of the Swiss authorities

    It also notes that guests from the United Kingdom, North America, Brazil, Southeast Asia and the Gulf States will be particularly confronted with this problem, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “The industry is affected to different degrees depending on the tourism region and service provider,” it also notes while assuring travellers that it – Switzerland Tourism (ST) – is working hard towards an immediate solution in this regard.

    Currently, travellers in Switzerland are eligible to take rapid COVID-19 tests for free, however, only until September 30.

    Read more
    13.09.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

    Entry into Switzerland is also possible without a Covid certificate, whereby the following entry conditions must be considered:

     

    Entering by car/coach/train:

    If you are travelling from a country or area without a variant of concern you can enter Switzerland without any further pandemic-related measures and you are therefore exempt from the test and quarantine requirement. For more info please fill the Travel check questionnaire.

     

    Entering by air:

    Test requirement

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Quarantine requirement

    Travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children– even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

     

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.If they continue their journey by train they have to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry.

     

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to other Schengen state
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to a third country
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to a state outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    Third-country citizens holding a residence document or a visa type D for their destination country in the Schengen area are permitted to travel through Switzerland to that country.
    The normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    It is only possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen state for a short stay of up to 90 days if you can prove that you have been vaccinated (see “How can I prove that I am vaccinated?”). Persons under 18 may enter Switzerland if they are travelling with an adult who has been vaccinated.
    Otherwise the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    If you have not been vaccinated, but your destination country in the Schengen area has authorised your entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, you may only enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to your destination country (i.e. you may not travel though Switzerland).

     

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen state, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
    Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry from non high-risk countries (as listed here)

    Entry to Switzerland is possible provided that the normal entry requirements are met when crossing the border (e.g. valid visa and travel document).

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    Entry from a high-risk country (that is not listed here) is possible if one of the following criteria, as well as the normal entry requirements are met:

    • You have Swiss citizenship.
    • You hold a travel document (e.g. a passport or identity card) and:
      • a Swiss residence permit (L B C Ci permit);
      • a cross-border permit (G permit),
      • an FDFA legitimation card;
      • a D visa issued by Switzerland;
      • a C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020 in a valid exceptional case or in order to work on a short-term contract;
      • an assurance of a residence permit
      • a confirmation of notification for the cross-border provision of services up to 90 days in any calendar year (e.g. UK nationals).
    • You hold a refugee’s or stateless person’s travel document issued by Switzerland, a passport for foreign nationals issued by Switzerland, a valid residence or permanent residence permit or an F-Permit.
    • You have rights of free movement. If you require a visa, a valid Schengen C-visa, a valid D-visa or a valid Schengen residence permit are sufficient.
    • You are in a situation of special necessity (see below). The border control authority will assess the necessity of the situation.
    • You can prove that they have been vaccinated with a recognised vaccine
    • You are under 18 and are travelling with an adult who has been fully vaccinated.
    • You are simply travelling directly through Switzerland with the intention and possibility of entering another country.

    You must be able to prove that you meet the abovementioned requirements. Suitable documentary proof must be produced at the border or when you apply for a visa.

    Find out more Information: Corona: Questions and answers on entry and stay in Switzerland, the exceptions and suspension of visas (admin.ch)

    Independent of the above-mentioned entry-requirements, health-related measures at the border may apply (see «What are the rules to enter this country from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?”)

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

     

    The entry form for incoming travellers can be found at swissplf.admin.ch.

    The form must be filled out by all travellers entering Switzerland by airplane. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight.

    The entry form must also be filled out for children. They can be included in the form of an adult travelling with them.

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

    In addition, travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport and when indoors in publicly accessible areas including.

    Further information on masks is available on the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health website.
    Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from a COVID-19 infection or a negative test result (up to 48 hours for a rapid antigen test or 72 hours for a PCR test) is required for entry into large-scale outdoor events attended by over 1,000 people. Children under the age of 16 are exempt from this requirement.
    From 13 September the need to show proof of vaccination/recovery from a COVID-19 inflection or a negative test result will be extended to:
    • Indoor hospitality venues including restaurants, bars, clubs and discos
    • Cultural, sporting and leisure activities indoors. This includes museums and libraries, leisure facilities, zoos, casinos, fitness centres and sports facilities, indoor pools and water parks
    • Indoor events including theatre and cinema, concerts, sporting events and private events outside the home (e.g. weddings).
    Further information is available from the Federal Office of Public Health
    .Cantons may imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.
    Switzerland only recognises Swiss COVID Certificates or EU Digital COVID Certificates for proof of entry to events or venues.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    09.09.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

    Entry into Switzerland is also possible without a Covid certificate, whereby the following entry conditions must be considered:

     

    Entering by car/coach/train:

    If you are travelling from a country or area without a variant of concern you can enter Switzerland without any further pandemic-related measures and you are therefore exempt from the test and quarantine requirement. For more info please fill the Travel check questionnaire.

     

    Entering by air:

    Test requirement

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Quarantine requirement

    Travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children– even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

     

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.If they continue their journey by train they have to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry.

     

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to other Schengen state
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to a third country
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to a state outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    Third-country citizens holding a residence document or a visa type D for their destination country in the Schengen area are permitted to travel through Switzerland to that country.
    The normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    It is only possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen state for a short stay of up to 90 days if you can prove that you have been vaccinated (see “How can I prove that I am vaccinated?”). Persons under 18 may enter Switzerland if they are travelling with an adult who has been vaccinated.
    Otherwise the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    If you have not been vaccinated, but your destination country in the Schengen area has authorised your entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, you may only enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to your destination country (i.e. you may not travel though Switzerland).

     

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen state, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
    Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry from non high-risk countries (as listed here)

    Entry to Switzerland is possible provided that the normal entry requirements are met when crossing the border (e.g. valid visa and travel document).

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    Entry from a high-risk country (that is not listed here) is possible if one of the following criteria, as well as the normal entry requirements are met:

    • You have Swiss citizenship.
    • You hold a travel document (e.g. a passport or identity card) and:
      • a Swiss residence permit (L B C Ci permit);
      • a cross-border permit (G permit),
      • an FDFA legitimation card;
      • a D visa issued by Switzerland;
      • a C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020 in a valid exceptional case or in order to work on a short-term contract;
      • an assurance of a residence permit
      • a confirmation of notification for the cross-border provision of services up to 90 days in any calendar year (e.g. UK nationals).
    • You hold a refugee’s or stateless person’s travel document issued by Switzerland, a passport for foreign nationals issued by Switzerland, a valid residence or permanent residence permit or an F-Permit.
    • You have rights of free movement. If you require a visa, a valid Schengen C-visa, a valid D-visa or a valid Schengen residence permit are sufficient.
    • You are in a situation of special necessity (see below). The border control authority will assess the necessity of the situation.
    • You can prove that they have been vaccinated with a recognised vaccine
    • You are under 18 and are travelling with an adult who has been fully vaccinated.
    • You are simply travelling directly through Switzerland with the intention and possibility of entering another country.

    You must be able to prove that you meet the abovementioned requirements. Suitable documentary proof must be produced at the border or when you apply for a visa.

    Find out more Information: Corona: Questions and answers on entry and stay in Switzerland, the exceptions and suspension of visas (admin.ch)

    Independent of the above-mentioned entry-requirements, health-related measures at the border may apply (see «What are the rules to enter this country from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?”)

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

     

    The entry form for incoming travellers can be found at swissplf.admin.ch.

    The form must be filled out by all travellers entering Switzerland by airplane. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight.

    The entry form must also be filled out for children. They can be included in the form of an adult travelling with them.

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

    In addition, travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website .
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Be prepared for your plans to change: No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.
    If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.
    Plan ahead and make sure you: can access money; understand what your insurance will cover; can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

    Read more
    27.07.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

    Entry into Switzerland is also possible without a Covid certificate, whereby the following entry conditions must be considered:

     

    Entering by car/coach/train:

    If you are travelling from a country or area without a variant of concern you can enter Switzerland without any further pandemic-related measures and you are therefore exempt from the test and quarantine requirement. For more info please fill the Travel check questionnaire.

     

    Entering by air:

    Test requirement

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Quarantine requirement

    Travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children– even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

     

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.If they continue their journey by train they have to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry.

     

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to other Schengen state
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a Schengen state to a third country
    Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to a state outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    Third-country citizens holding a residence document or a visa type D for their destination country in the Schengen area are permitted to travel through Switzerland to that country.
    The normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    It is only possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen state for a short stay of up to 90 days if you can prove that you have been vaccinated (see “How can I prove that I am vaccinated?”). Persons under 18 may enter Switzerland if they are travelling with an adult who has been vaccinated.
    Otherwise the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

    If you have not been vaccinated, but your destination country in the Schengen area has authorised your entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, you may only enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to your destination country (i.e. you may not travel though Switzerland).

     

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen state
    When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen state, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply.

     

    Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
    Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)

    Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
    Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry from non high-risk countries (as listed here)

    Entry to Switzerland is possible provided that the normal entry requirements are met when crossing the border (e.g. valid visa and travel document).

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    Entry from a high-risk country (that is not listed here) is possible if one of the following criteria, as well as the normal entry requirements are met:

    • You have Swiss citizenship.
    • You hold a travel document (e.g. a passport or identity card) and:
      • a Swiss residence permit (L B C Ci permit);
      • a cross-border permit (G permit),
      • an FDFA legitimation card;
      • a D visa issued by Switzerland;
      • a C visa issued by Switzerland after 16 March 2020 in a valid exceptional case or in order to work on a short-term contract;
      • an assurance of a residence permit
      • a confirmation of notification for the cross-border provision of services up to 90 days in any calendar year (e.g. UK nationals).
    • You hold a refugee’s or stateless person’s travel document issued by Switzerland, a passport for foreign nationals issued by Switzerland, a valid residence or permanent residence permit or an F-Permit.
    • You have rights of free movement. If you require a visa, a valid Schengen C-visa, a valid D-visa or a valid Schengen residence permit are sufficient.
    • You are in a situation of special necessity (see below). The border control authority will assess the necessity of the situation.
    • You can prove that they have been vaccinated with a recognised vaccine
    • You are under 18 and are travelling with an adult who has been fully vaccinated.
    • You are simply travelling directly through Switzerland with the intention and possibility of entering another country.

    You must be able to prove that you meet the abovementioned requirements. Suitable documentary proof must be produced at the border or when you apply for a visa.

    Find out more Information: Corona: Questions and answers on entry and stay in Switzerland, the exceptions and suspension of visas (admin.ch)

    Independent of the above-mentioned entry-requirements, health-related measures at the border may apply (see «What are the rules to enter this country from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?”)

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    Travelcheck tool

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area, so called countries or areas with variants of concern.

     

    The entry form for incoming travellers can be found at swissplf.admin.ch.

    The form must be filled out by all travellers entering Switzerland by airplane. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight.

    The entry form must also be filled out for children. They can be included in the form of an adult travelling with them.

    Travellers who are not fully vaccinated or unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months will have to present proof of a negative PCR test (max. 72 hours old) or rapid antigen test (max. 48 hours old) in the following cases:

    Children under the age of 16 are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

    In addition, travellers who have been in a country with a variant of concern in the last 10 days before entering Switzerland and who have not been vaccinated according to the requirements of the Swiss authorities or are unable to prove that they have recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months must go into quarantine after entering Switzerland.

    The quarantine requirement also applies to children even if the parents are fully vaccinated.

    There is the possibility of shortening travel quarantine from day 7 onwards.

     

    Proof of vaccination

    Persons who have been vaccinated are persons who have received a vaccine that:

    • is authorised in Switzerland and which has been administered in full in accordance with the recommendations of the Federal Office of Public Health of Switzerland;
    • has been authorised by the European Medicines Agency for the European Union and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered; or
    • is authorised under the WHO Emergency Use Listing and has been administered in full in accordance with the requirements or recommendations of the country in which the vaccination was administered.

    The vaccination is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the date on which it was administered in full; the Janssen vaccine is regarded as being effective for 12 months from the 22nd day after it was administered in full.

    Proof of vaccination may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • the date of vaccination;
    • the vaccine used.

     

    Proof of recovery

    Proof of recovery remains valid for 6 months from the 11th day following confirmation of the infection.

    Proof of recovery may be provided in the form that is customary at the time. In addition to the surname, forename and date of birth of the person concerned, it must include the following information:

    • confirmation of the infection including the name and address of the confirming body (test centre, doctor, pharmacy, hospital);
    • confirmation that isolation has been terminated or confirmation from a doctor of recovery.

     

    Find out more:

    Rules for entering Switzerland

    What to do after entering Switzerland

    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement

    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites
    for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.

    Read more
    21.07.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Sweden adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Sweden are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Citizens from EU Member States and Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, as well as people with Swedish residence permits, are allowed to enter Sweden at the conditions provided below.

    The Government has extended until 31 August 2021 the general entry ban for foreign citizens who are not able to present a vaccination certificate, a negative COVID-19 test result, or a certificate confirming the recovery from COVID-19.

    Travellers from the Nordic countries (Finland, Norway, Denmark, and Iceland) are exempted from the COVID-19 test requirement. This also applies to people with residence permits in Sweden, regardless of citizenship.

    Travellers from the other EU and Schengen Associated Countries must present either:

    • Certificate of vaccination against the COVID-19;
    • Certificate of recovery from COVID-19;
    • a negative pre-departure COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
      Accepted tests: antigen, TMA, PCR, LAMP

      The following information must appear on the certificate:

      • name of the person who has been tested
      • date/time of the test
      • type of test
      • the test result
      • Issuer of the certificate

    The information must be provided in one of these languages: Swedish, English, Norwegian, Danish or French.

    Exemptions are available for cross-border workers and some other categories.

    Citizens from an EEA country do not need to follow the Public Health Agency of Sweden’s recommendations after arrival if no symptoms are present. 

     

     

    Find out more:
    International travel restrictions (Krisinformation.se)
    Information about the Swedish travel restrictions from the Police
    Questions and answers about the entry ban to Sweden – Government.se
    Frequently asked questions about the temporary entry ban to the EU via Sweden
    Information about travelling to Sweden from Visit Sweden (Sweden’s official website for tourism and travel information)

     

    Contact for Sweden:
    For questions about the entry restrictions to Sweden, contact the Swedish Police on 114 14.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The Government has decided to extend the general entry ban for foreign citizens until 31 August 2021.A temporary ban on non-essential travel to the EU via Sweden, introduced following a call from the European Council and the European Commission, has been in effect since March 2020. The ban includes certain exemptions.

    A list of countries exempted from the ban on non-essential travel is available at krisinformation.se.

    To travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU/ EEA, you must be covered by at least one of the exemptions from the entry ban and also be able to present a negative COVID-19 test max 48 hours old.

    In addition, you should follow the the Public Health Agency of Sweden’s recommendations for everyone travelling to Sweden from abroad regardless of symptoms if you are not fully vaccinated and if you are entering from a country where the Ministry of Foreign Affairs discourage from non-essential travel.

    The entry ban does not apply to:

    • EU and Schengen Associated Countries citizens and their family members;
    • permanent residents or holders of a residence permit in Sweden or another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have a national visa in Sweden or a national visa valid longer than three months in another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have family ties as specified under the Aliens Act (2005:716).

     

    Find out more:
    Recommendations for people entering Sweden from abroad

    polisen.se
    Questions and answers about the entry ban to Sweden – Government.se

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites
    for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.

    Read more
    16.07.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    Travellers arriving by air are not subject to further requirements if they can provide one of the following:

    • proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period);
    • a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Accepted tests:
      • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
      • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Travellers arriving by other means of transport are not subject to testing or isolation requirements.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border. For young people aged between 12 and 16, the same applies as for children, as long as they are not travelling from a country that is on the FOPH list of risk countries due to a variant of concern.

     

    Entry from a country with a “variant of concern”

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    All other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with a “variant of concern”, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests:

    • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
    • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to another Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen country is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country that is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible, subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The same applies to all travellers – even non-vaccinated ones – as long as they are not arriving by plane.

    All other travellers arriving by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted.

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

     

    Entry from countries with a variant of concern

    All travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an area of concern, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 12 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:

    • You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight;
    • You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.

    Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19).

    The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites
    for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.

    Read more
    07.07.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    Travellers arriving by air are not subject to further requirements if they can provide one of the following:

    • proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period);
    • a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Accepted tests:
      • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
      • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Travellers arriving by other means of transport are not subject to testing or isolation requirements.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border. For young people aged between 12 and 16, the same applies as for children, as long as they are not travelling from a country that is on the FOPH list of risk countries due to a variant of concern.

     

    Entry from a country with a “variant of concern”

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    All other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with a “variant of concern”, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests:

    • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
    • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to another Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen country is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country that is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible, subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The same applies to all travellers – even non-vaccinated ones – as long as they are not arriving by plane.

    All other travellers arriving by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted.

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

     

    Entry from countries with a variant of concern

    All travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an area of concern, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 12 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:

    • You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight;
    • You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.

    Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19).

    The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites
    for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.

    Read more
    05.07.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to ease COVID-19 entry restrictions for arrivals from Schengen Area and third countries from 26 June (SVI, 24.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    Travellers arriving by air are not subject to further requirements if they can provide one of the following:

    • proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period);
    • a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Accepted tests:
      • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
      • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Travellers arriving by other means of transport are not subject to testing or isolation requirements.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border. For young people aged between 12 and 16, the same applies as for children, as long as they are not travelling from a country that is on the FOPH list of risk countries due to a variant of concern.

     

    Entry from a country with a “variant of concern”

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 1 year from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    All other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with a “variant of concern”, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests:

    • PCR taken within 72 hours prior to arrival
    • Antigenic test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival

    Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

    Children under 12 years old are never required to provide proof of a negative coronavirus test on entering Switzerland. They are exempt from the test requirement on boarding and from the test requirement at the Swiss border.

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Passengers in transit, such as air travellers who have to change their flight, must complete an entry form before a stopover in Switzerland.

    Additionally, the following rules apply:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to another Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen country is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country that is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible, subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area (classification of risk areas).

     

    Entry from non high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The same applies to all travellers – even non-vaccinated ones – as long as they are not arriving by plane.

    All other travellers arriving by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted.

     

    Entry from high-risk countries

    In the following cases, travellers are not subject to any restriction:

    • full vaccination against COVID-19 (validity: 6 months from last dose);
    • recovery from COVID-19 (validity: from 11 days after a positive test result, and within 6 months from the end of the isolation period).

    The other travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 16 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7.

     

    Entry from countries with a variant of concern

    All travellers who, in the last 10 days, have stayed in a country with an area of concern, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Children under 12 years old are exempted. Additionally, they must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities. The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are not vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19, you must complete an entry form in the following cases:

    • You are entering Switzerland by rail, bus or coach, boat or air. This also includes a stopover in Switzerland, for example air travellers who have to change flight;
    • You have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland.

    Travellers from countries with a variant of concern are always subject to the entry form requirement (even if they are vaccinated or recovered from COVID-19).

    The entry form must also be filled out for children (who can be included on the form of an adult travelling with them).

     

    Find out more:
    Rules for entering Switzerland
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Exemptions to the testing and quarantine requirement
    Exemptions to the entry form requirement

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites
    for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions.
    Private gatherings of up to 50 people outdoors and up to 30 people indoors are permitted. Indoor restaurant service has resumed, with no more than four people per table. Public events of up to 100 people indoors and up to 300 people outdoors are able to take place. Thermal baths and spa facilities have reopend.
    From Saturday 26 June, further measures will be relaxed. Restaurants will no longer have group size limits at tables. Clubs and discos will reopen. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites
    for further details.

    Read more
    29.06.2021
  • Switzerland The Swiss Government has revealed its plans to ease the entry restrictions for third-country nationals wishing to visit the country.

    According to the Federal Council, with the approval of the outlined draft that aims to ease the measures, from June 28, travellers from third countries who prove that they have been vaccinated against the COVID-19 will no longer be subject to entry restrictions upon arrival.

    Strict entry restrictions for third-country nationals have been applied since June 19, 2020, in order to halt the spread of the COVID-19 infection and its mutations. Since then, the Federal Council has steadily relaxed these restrictions, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    In addition, due to an improvement of the Coronavirus situation and the fast vaccination rate, the Swiss Federal Council also proposed to significantly relax the border restrictions imposed against travellers from Schengen Area countries. This means that all persons entering Switzerland from a Schengen Area country will no longer be required to self-isolate upon arrival in Switzerland.

    The requirement to present a negative COVID-19 test result will only remain mandatory for persons who have not been vaccinated yet or those who have been vaccinated with a vaccine that has not been approved by the Swiss authorities.

    “Entry into Switzerland must be made easier. The Federal Council decided at its meeting on June 11, 2021. Health measures at the border must now focus on people from countries in which a worrying variant of the virus is circulating. The quarantine requirement must be lifted for people in the Schengen area. In addition, the current entry ban for travellers from third countries should be lifted if they are vaccinated,” the statement of Switzerland’s Government reads.

    On the other hand, the authorities have decided to only impose health measures on arrivals from countries with a worrying virus mutation.

    Switzerland’s list of countries with a worrying COVID-19 mutation includes the following countries:

    Brazil
    Canada
    India
    Nepal
    South Africa
    United Kingdom
    However, persons arriving from the UK and Canada or any other country mentioned above will be allowed to skip testing and quarantine requirements, provided that they have been vaccinated or have recovered from the COVID-19.

    “In the event of new mutations of the virus against which vaccination would no longer protect, the obligation of testing and quarantine could be extended to those vaccinated and cured,” the Government added.

    Read more
    14.06.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government removes several European countries, Qatar and Palestinian Territories from COVID-19 quarantine list (The Local, 20.05.2021). Swiss government to end COVID-19 quarantine requirement for vaccinated travelers from 31 May, will maintain some restrictions for arrivals from high-risk countries (The Local – Switzerland, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    20.05.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government to end COVID-19 quarantine requirement for vaccinated travelers from 31 May, will maintain some restrictions for arrivals from high-risk countries (The Local – Switzerland, 13.05.2021). Swiss government adds Cape Verde, Egypt, Mexico, Qatar to quarantine list; Maldives removed from list (The Local – Switzerland, 03.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    14.05.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds Cape Verde, Egypt, Mexico, Qatar to quarantine list; Maldives removed from list (The Local – Switzerland, 03.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    11.05.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds Cape Verde, Egypt, Mexico, Qatar to quarantine list; Maldives removed from list (The Local – Switzerland, 03.05.2021). Swiss government adds India to its list of high-risk countries from which travelers must enter quarantine (Zee News, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    04.05.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds India to its list of high-risk countries from which travelers must enter quarantine (Zee News, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds India to its list of high-risk countries from which travelers must enter quarantine (Zee News, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    29.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds India to its list of high-risk countries from which travelers must enter quarantine (Zee News, 28.04.2021). Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Outdoor terraces of restaurants and bars have reopened.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    22.04.2021
  • Switzerland The Swiss authorities have created two lists in which they place countries based on their number of COVID-19 cases – the list of high-risk countries and the list of low-risk countries. Based on which list a country is placed, are determined the restrictions imposed on arrivals from the same.

    The lists are established based on a few criteria, including if the number of new infections per 100,000 people in the country or region concerned in the last two weeks is more than 60 higher than in Switzerland, and this number is not due to individual events or local cases.

    The mutation of the virus detected in the state or area in question is also taken as a factor, as well as the number of infected people who were in the country or area concerned, who have entered Switzerland in the last four weeks before the update of the list.

    Since April 19, the most recent update of the list, the following Schengen Area countries are placed in the list of low-risk countries:

    Austria
    Belgium
    Czech Republic
    Denmark
    Estonia
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Greece
    Hungary
    Iceland
    Italy
    Latvia
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania
    Luxembourg
    Malta
    Netherlands
    Norway
    Poland
    Portugal
    Slovakia
    Slovenia
    Spain
    Sweden
    The following European microstates and individual third countries are also part of the list:

    Andorra
    Australia
    Bulgaria
    Croatia
    Cyprus
    Ireland
    Monaco
    New Zealand
    Romania
    Rwanda
    San Marino
    Singapore
    South Korea
    Thailand
    Vatican / Holy See
    At the same time, the authorities in several cases may exclude border areas from the high-risk list, even if they have a high number of cases, due to the close economic, social and cultural exchange with the neighbouring countries.

    The rest of the world countries, which are not included above, are considered as high risk, and therefore, arrivals from those areas are subject to stricter entry restrictions.

    Filling an Entry Form Before Reaching Switzerland – an Obligation for All
    Almost everyone travelling to Switzerland is obliged to fill out an entry form using a computer or smartphone before they reach Switzerland. Once the form is completed, the travellers will receive an email with a QR code.

    During entry controls, the traveller will have to show the QR code to the border guards. The code can be shown either on a smartphone or printed.

    In spite of this requirement, several categories are exempt from meeting it, including those who are entering Switzerland from a border area, with which there is close economic, social and cultural exchange.

    Those transporting people or goods across the borders as a part of their professional activity are also exempt from the requirement. People transiting the country are also exempt.

    The entry form is not an obligation to those who enter Switzerland with their own vehicle, who have not been in a state or area with an increased risk of infection within the last ten days.

    COVID-19 Negative Test Results for Those Reaching the Country by Air, Water & Land
    Just like the rest of the European countries, Switzerland also has in place a requirement of negative results of a COVID-19 test to enter the country.

    The requirement, however, changes depending on the means of travel with which one reaches Switzerland, as explained below.

    COVID-19 Negative Test Results for Those Reaching Switzerland by Air
    All travellers eligible to enter the Swiss territory who reach the country by air are subject to the requirement of a negative result of a COVID-19 test, which they must present twice. First, the traveller must present the test when boarding for departure abroad and secondly at the Swiss airport.

    During boarding, airline companies are obliged to check COVID-19 tests, and they accept only two types of them:

    PCR tests done within the last 72 hours
    Rapid antigen tests performed within the last 24 hours
    Those who fail to present the test results will be rejected from boarding the plane.

    Upon arrival at a Swiss airport, the border control authority in the transit area of ​​the airport controls the negative test result of the travellers with random samples. Only PCR tests done within the last 72 hours are accepted.

    Those who do not have a negative PCR test result must be tested in Switzerland immediately, with a rapid PCR or antigen test.

    COVID-19 Negative Test Results for Those Reaching Switzerland by Land & Water
    As per those reaching Switzerland through land or boat, who have stayed in one of the high risk countries within the ten previous days, they will need to stay in quarantine, but also to present the negative results of a PCR test performed within the last 72 hours.

    Those who do not hold a certificate showing they have tested for the virus need to be tested in Switzerland as soon as possible. Both rapid PCR and antigen tests are accepted.

    Who Is Obliged to Quarantine? What Are the Rules?
    Those who have been in one of the countries which are on the list of high-risk areas within the last ten days before reaching Switzerland fall subject to the requirement of self-isolation imposed by Swiss authorities. Vaccinated travellers are not exempt from the measure.

    All travellers are obliged to quarantine at their home or another suitable place of accommodation as soon as they enter the country. They should also report their entry to the responsible cantonal authority within two days.

    If the traveller takes a PCR or antigen rapid test on the seventh day of their isolation and the result is negative, the isolation can be terminated.

    Travellers that are caught violating their quarantine obligation can be punished with a fine of up to CHF 10,000.

    Is Anyone Exempt From the Requirements of Testing & Quarantine?
    Several categories of people are exempt from the quarantine and testing requirement when entering the territory of Switzerland, as follows:

    Business travellers who are entering Switzerland for a business reason, which cannot be postponed
    Individuals travelling for an important medical reason that cannot be postponed
    Transit passengers who have been in a state or area with an increased risk of infection for less than 24 hours
    Transit passengers, who will only pass through the country to reach their destination
    People who transport people or goods across borders in their duty
    They, however, remain subject to the obligation to present negative COVID-19 test result boarding an aircraft.

    Read more
    21.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    20.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    The following rules apply to travelling through Switzerland to another country:

    • Transit from a Schengen country to other Schengen country
      Entry from a Schengen state for the purpose of travelling on to another Schengen state is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a Schengen country to a third country
      Entry from a Schengen country for the purpose of travelling on to a country outside the Schengen area is possible for anyone who is lawfully present in the Schengen area
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a high-risk country in order to travel on to another Schengen country for a short stay of up to 90 days that does not require a residence document. However, third-country citizens holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen area are allowed to travel through Switzerland to that country. If the country of destination in the Schengen area has authorised entry for a short stay of up to 90 days, the person concerned must enter the Schengen area by travelling directly to that country
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to a Schengen country
      When entering Switzerland from a third country that is not considered high-risk in order to travel on to another Schengen country, the normal requirements for entering Switzerland apply
    • Transit from a third country considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      It is not possible to enter Switzerland from a third country that is considered high-risk in order to travel on to another country outside the Schengen area, unless transiting through Zurich or Geneva airport. Travellers should check whether they require a transit visa. In such cases, travellers do not actually enter Switzerland but remain in the transit area of the airport.
      Transit visa requirements: Passport and visa requirements not depending on citizenship (PDF, 337 kB, 18.03.2021)
    • Transit from a third country not considered by the SEM to be high-risk to another third country
      Entry into Switzerland from a third country which is not on the SEM high-risk list for onward travel to another country outside the Schengen area is possible subject to the normal entry and transit requirements (N.B. a transit visa may be required).

     

    Find out more:
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
    Rules applicable to unmarried couples

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    09.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    01.04.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Sweden adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Sweden are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Citizens from EU Member States (with the exception of Denmark) and Schengen Associated countries (with the exception of Norway), and their family members, as well as people with Swedish residence permits, are allowed to enter Sweden at the conditions specified hereafter.

    Until 31 March, Sweden enforces a stricter entry ban from Denmark and Norway. Foreigners coming from Denmark are allowed to enter Sweden if they live or work in Sweden. Exceptions apply to people who live on Bornholm and travel, via Sweden, between Bornholm and another part of Denmark, as well as to health and medical personnel who shall perform work on Bornholm and personnel who shall perform health and medical transports. Other than those exemptions, only Swedish citizens are allowed to enter Sweden from Denmark.

    From 31 March, Danish and Norwegian citizens can enter under the same requirements as other EU/EEA nationals.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.
    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.
    Accepted tests: antigen, TMA, PCR, LAMP.
    Children aged 17 and under are exempted.

    The following information must appear on the certificate:

    • name of the person who has been tested
    • date/time of the test
    • type of test
    • the test result
    • Issuer of the certificate

    The information must be clearly stated in Swedish, English, Norwegian or Danish.

    Exemptions are available for cross-border workers and some other categories.

    If you got tested before your departure for Sweden, you do not have to get tested again in connection with your arrival, but you should still get tested 5 days after your arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine is not required.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Airline operators may require passengers to show a health statement but this is not a general requirement for entering Sweden.

     

    Find out more:
    International travel restrictions – Krisinformation.se

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Until 31 May 2021, there is an entry ban for non-essential travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU.

    The entry ban does not apply to:

    • EU and Schengen Associated Countries citizens and their family members;
    • permanent residents or holders of a residence permit in Sweden or another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have a national visa in Sweden or a national visa valid longer than three months in another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have family ties as specified under the Aliens Act (2005:716).

    Entry in Sweden is allowed for foreigners who reside in the following countries: Australia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea and Thailand.

    A temporary entry ban applies to all passengers arriving from the UK. UK nationals who can demonstrate that they live or work in Sweden or have urgent family reasons are exempt. Swedish citizens are also exempt.

    Travellers to Sweden from the UK who are exempt from the entry ban will have to show a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Sweden. Holders of Swedish passports do not have to do this.

    Citizens of other countries who have particularly urgent needs or who are to carry out essential functions in Sweden can also be allowed entry. This includes an exemption for students and highly skilled professionals, amongst others. For more information.

     

    Find out more:
    polisen.se

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers arriving by air, as well as all travellers entering by bus/rail/car who have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection in the 10 days before entering Switzerland, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.
    Only molecular tests are accepted – the result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, must complete a mandatory quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

    Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    23.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map. The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    19.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:
    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.
    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighboring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.
    A negative coronavirus test is required:
    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.
    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.
    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available. Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.
    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.
    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement. Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs.

    *From Third Countries: The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    16.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions: *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    12.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions: *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19.
    You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory.
    Switzerland has relaxed some coronavirus restrictions. Groups of up to 15 people are able to gather outdoors, shops selling non-essential goods have reopened, sports and cultural activities are able to take place outdoors. Restaurants, bars and clubs remain closed.
    For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    05.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    02.03.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Non-essential businesses to reopen from 1 March, restaurants from 22 March as government eases COVID-19 restrictions (Swiss Info, 25.02.2021). Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (The Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    26.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Sweden adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Sweden are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Citizens from EU Member States (with the exception of Denmark) and Schengen Associated countries (with the exception of Norway), and their family members, as well as people with Swedish residence permits, are allowed to enter Sweden at the conditions specified hereafter.

    Sweden enforces a stricter entry ban from Denmark and Norway, including all foreign citizens except personnel transporting goods or passengers, foreign diplomats or consular staff and their families and staff, foreign couriers, people working in or for an international organisation and people with urgent family reasons.

    Foreigners coming from Denmark are allowed to enter Sweden if they live or work in Sweden. Exceptions also apply to people who live on Bornholm and travel, via Sweden, between Bornholm and another part of Denmark, as well as to health and medical personnel who shall perform work on Bornholm and personnel who shall perform health and medical transports. Other than those exemptions, only Swedish citizens will be allowed to enter Sweden from Denmark.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Upon entry into Sweden, foreign nationals aged 18 and above have to present a negative result to a COVID-19 test, regardless of where they are arriving from. The test must not be older than 48 hours.

    Approved tests: Antigen, PCR and LAMP.

    The following information must appear on the certificate:

    • name of the person who has been tested
    • date/time of the test
    • type of test (antigen, PCR or LAMP)
    • the test result
    • Issuer of the certificate

    The information must be clearly stated in Swedish, English, Norwegian or Danish.

    Exemptions are available for cross-border workers and some other categories.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    NO.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Airline operators may require passengers to show a health statement but this is not a general requirement for entering Sweden.

     

    Find out more:
    krisinformationen.se

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry in Sweden is allowed for foreigners who reside in the following countries: Australia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea and Thailand.

    The Swedish government has decided to stop all non-essential travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU. This ban will be in effect until 31 March 2021.
    The entry ban does not apply to:

    • EU and Schengen Associated Countries citizens and their family members;
    • permanent residents or holders of a residence permit in Sweden or another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have a national visa in Sweden or a national visa valid longer than three months in another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have family ties as specified under the Aliens Act (2005:716).

    A temporary entry ban applies to all passengers arriving from the UK. UK nationals who can demonstrate that they live or work in Sweden or have urgent family reasons are exempt. Swedish citizens are also exempt. Travellers to Sweden from the UK who are exempt from the entry ban will have to show a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Sweden. Holders of Swedish passports do not have to do this.

    Citizens of other countries who have particularly urgent needs or who are to carry out essential functions in Sweden can also be allowed entry. This includes an exemption for students and highly skilled professionals, amongst others. For more information.

     

    Find out more:
    polisen.se

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    23.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Sweden adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Sweden are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Citizens from EU Member States (with the exception of Denmark) and Schengen Associated countries (with the exception of Norway), and their family members, as well as people with Swedish residence permits, are allowed to enter Sweden at the conditions specified hereafter.

    Sweden enforces a stricter entry ban from Denmark and Norway, including all foreign citizens except personnel transporting goods or passengers, foreign diplomats or consular staff and their families and staff, foreign couriers, people working in or for an international organisation and people with urgent family reasons.

    Foreigners coming from Denmark are allowed to enter Sweden if they live or work in Sweden. Exceptions also apply to people who live on Bornholm and travel, via Sweden, between Bornholm and another part of Denmark, as well as to health and medical personnel who shall perform work on Bornholm and personnel who shall perform health and medical transports. Other than those exemptions, only Swedish citizens will be allowed to enter Sweden from Denmark.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Upon entry into Sweden, foreign nationals aged 18 and above have to present a negative result to a COVID-19 test, regardless of where they are arriving from. The test must not be older than 48 hours.

    Approved tests: Antigen, PCR and LAMP.

    The following information must appear on the certificate:

    • name of the person who has been tested
    • date/time of the test
    • type of test (antigen, PCR or LAMP)
    • the test result
    • Issuer of the certificate

    The information must be clearly stated in Swedish, English, Norwegian or Danish.

    Exemptions are available for cross-border workers and some other categories.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    NO.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Airline operators may require passengers to show a health statement but this is not a general requirement for entering Sweden.

     

    Find out more:
    krisinformationen.se

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry in Sweden is allowed for foreigners who reside in the following countries: Australia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea and Thailand.

    The Swedish government has decided to stop all non-essential travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU. This ban will be in effect until 31 March 2021.
    The entry ban does not apply to:

    • EU and Schengen Associated Countries citizens and their family members;
    • permanent residents or holders of a residence permit in Sweden or another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have a national visa in Sweden or a national visa valid longer than three months in another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have family ties as specified under the Aliens Act (2005:716).

    A temporary entry ban applies to all passengers arriving from the UK. UK nationals who can demonstrate that they live or work in Sweden or have urgent family reasons are exempt. Swedish citizens are also exempt. Travellers to Sweden from the UK who are exempt from the entry ban will have to show a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Sweden. Holders of Swedish passports do not have to do this.

    Citizens of other countries who have particularly urgent needs or who are to carry out essential functions in Sweden can also be allowed entry. This includes an exemption for students and highly skilled professionals, amongst others. For more information.

     

    Find out more:
    polisen.se

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    19.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries defined as COVID-19 risk area. If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative coronavirus test is required:

    • If you enter Switzerland by air (without a negative test result you are not allowed to board the aircraft);
    • If you have stayed in a country with an increased risk of infection within the 10 days before entering Switzerland. In this case you must always be able to show proof of a negative test result, even if you enter Switzerland by bus, rail, car, etc.

    The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours before entry and it has to be a molecular-biological test (for example a PCR test). The result of a rapid antigen test is not sufficient.

    Exceptions: Children under age 12 are not subject to the testing requirement. More exemptions from the Testing and Quarantine Requirement are available.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who, in the last 10 days before entry into Switzerland, have spent time in a country or area with an increased risk of infection, are legally required to go into quarantine and report their arrival in Switzerland to the cantonal authorities.

    Exceptions: Certain people are exempt from the quarantine requirement.

    The quarantine can be shortened with a negative result to a PCR test taken on day 7. COVID-19 vaccination does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Before your entry to Switzerland, the electronic entry form available at swissplf.admin.ch must be filled out.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    What to do after entering Switzerland
    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    16.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Sweden adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Sweden are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Citizens from EU Member States (with the exception of Denmark) and Schengen Associated countries (with the exception of Norway), and their family members, as well as people with Swedish residence permits, are allowed to enter Sweden at the conditions specified hereafter.

    Sweden enforces a stricter entry ban from Denmark and Norway, including all foreign citizens except personnel transporting goods or passengers, foreign diplomats or consular staff and their families and staff, foreign couriers, people working in or for an international organisation and people with urgent family reasons.

    Foreigners coming from Denmark are allowed to enter Sweden if they live or work in Sweden. Exceptions also apply to people who live on Bornholm and travel, via Sweden, between Bornholm and another part of Denmark, as well as to health and medical personnel who shall perform work on Bornholm and personnel who shall perform health and medical transports. Other than those exemptions, only Swedish citizens will be allowed to enter Sweden from Denmark.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Upon entry into Sweden, foreign nationals aged 18 and above have to present a negative result to a COVID-19 test, regardless of where they are arriving from. The test must not be older than 48 hours.

    Approved tests: Antigen, PCR and LAMP.

    The following information must appear on the certificate:

    • name of the person who has been tested
    • date/time of the test
    • type of test (antigen, PCR or LAMP)
    • the test result
    • Issuer of the certificate

    The information must be clearly stated in Swedish, English, Norwegian or Danish.

    Exemptions are available for cross-border workers and some other categories.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    NO.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Airline operators may require passengers to show a health statement but this is not a general requirement for entering Sweden.

     

    Find out more:
    krisinformationen.se

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry in Sweden is allowed for foreigners who reside in the following countries: Australia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea and Thailand.

    The Swedish government has decided to stop all non-essential travel to Sweden from countries outside the EU. This ban will be in effect until 31 March 2021.
    The entry ban does not apply to:

    • EU and Schengen Associated Countries citizens and their family members;
    • permanent residents or holders of a residence permit in Sweden or another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have a national visa in Sweden or a national visa valid longer than three months in another EU Member State or Schengen Associated country;
    • People who have family ties as specified under the Aliens Act (2005:716).

    A temporary entry ban applies to all passengers arriving from the UK. UK nationals who can demonstrate that they live or work in Sweden or have urgent family reasons are exempt. Swedish citizens are also exempt. Travellers to Sweden from the UK who are exempt from the entry ban will have to show a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Sweden. Holders of Swedish passports do not have to do this.

    Citizens of other countries who have particularly urgent needs or who are to carry out essential functions in Sweden can also be allowed entry. This includes an exemption for students and highly skilled professionals, amongst others. For more information.

     

    Find out more:
    polisen.se

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    12.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as COVID-19 risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries concerned.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within 2 days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative test result does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement, neither it shortens the quarantine period.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing
    . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). Swiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    11.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as COVID-19 risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries concerned.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within 2 days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative test result does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement, neither it shortens the quarantine period.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    02.02.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government changes its COVID-19 testing and quarantine policy (Siss Info, 28.01.2021). Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry rules in response to coronavirus (COVID-19): Travelers from the UK are not permitted entry to Switzerland. UK nationals and other non-Swiss nationals arriving from a “high risk-country” or outside the Schengen area are not permitted entry to Switzerland. Only the following categories of people are permitted entry: Swiss and Liechtenstein nationals; Holders of the following documents:
    • a residence permit, i.e. a Swiss residence permit (L / B / C / Ci permits);
    • a cross-border permit (G permit),
    • an FDFA legitimation card;
    • a D visa issued by Switzerland;
    • Holders of a ‘laissez passer’ issued by a Swiss representation in cases of ‘individual special necessity’.
    Further information and a list of ‘high risk countries’ can be found on the website of the State Secretariat of Migration. These restrictions do not apply to UK nationals who are legally resident in Switzerland; you will need to show proof of residence. These restrictions do not apply to UK nationals who are travelling from other Schengen countries. If you do not hold a residence permit, or do not have your permit with you but are resident in Switzerland, or are otherwise exempted, you will need to apply for a ‘laissez passer’ from the Swiss Embassy.
    From 8 February, travellers from ‘high risk countries’, including the UK, will need to present a negative COVID-19 test result (rapid antigen test or PCR), carried out less than 72 hours before arrival. Anyone arriving in Switzerland by air, even from a country that is not considered high risk will need to present a negative COVID-19 test result (rapid antigen test or PCR) before arrival. Further information, including a list of ‘high risk countries’ are available on the Federal Office of Public Health website.
    From 8 February, all travellers to Switzerland arriving by air, boat, bus or train must complete an online form on arrival and provide contact details.

    *From within the EU:

    Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as COVID-19 risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health provides a regularly updated list of countries concerned.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within 2 days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    A negative test result does not exempt from the mandatory quarantine requirement, neither it shortens the quarantine period.

     

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch
    State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    29.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe.

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    .

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    26.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons.
    Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Wearing face masks in enclosed public spaces is compulsory. Shops selling non-essential goods, restaurants, bars, clubs, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 28 February. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. Public gatherings, sporting and cultural activities, and meetings in private households are limited to a maximum of five people (including children). For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    14.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government imposes COVID-19 quarantine for arrivals from Ireland, other countries (THe Local, 12.01.2021). Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: Switzerland has put measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. You should follow therules on hygiene and social distancing . These include:
    • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly
    • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people
    • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, on platforms and in waiting areas, as well as at airports. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: Restaurants, bars, cultural venues, and sports and leisure facilities are closed until 22 January 2021. Takeaways and delivery services may remain open. The number of people who may be in a shop is limited, and shops must close between 7pm and 6am, and on Sundays and public holidays. Cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation can choose to relax these restrictions. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see theSwiss Government website . Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should checkcantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    13.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021). Swiss government will reopen airports to flights from U.K. and South Africa from 24 December but only for certain travelers (The Local Switzerland, 23.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    .

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    11.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss health authorities add Czech Republic, Denmark, Netherlands, Panama to their quarantine list; others removed (Reuters, 06.01.2021). Swiss government will reopen airports to flights from U.K. and South Africa from 24 December but only for certain travelers (The Local Switzerland, 23.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Switzerland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Switzerland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    08.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government will reopen airports to flights from U.K. and South Africa from 24 December but only for certain travelers (The Local Switzerland, 23.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs
    *From Third Countries:

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    05.01.2021
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government will reopen airports to flights from U.K. and South Africa from 24 December but only for certain travelers (The Local Switzerland, 23.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK, and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of the UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    Anyone arriving in Switzerland from the United Kingdom since 14 December, regardless of nationality, is required to self-isolate for 10 days from the date of arrival. British citizens currently in quarantine who intend to travel to the airport will need to follow protective measures to remain in quarantine; local cantonal authorities will be able to advise on this, which may include avoiding public transport.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine will be notified during the flight, onboard of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:
    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    28.12.2020
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government will reopen airports to flights from U.K. and South Africa from 24 December but only for certain travelers (The Local Switzerland, 23.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    On 20 December, Switzerland announced a general entry ban for all travellers from the UK, and suspended all flights between the UK and Switzerland. On 23 December, the Swiss Government introduced an exemption to allow passenger flights to/from the UK from 24 December for the purpose of enabling residents of UK and Switzerland to return in both directions.

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    24.12.2020
  • Switzerland Latest News: Swiss government adds South Africa to entry ban (Reuters, 21.12.2020). Switzerland have announced they will be suspending air travel to/from the United Kingdom. (Gov.UK, 20.12.2020). Germany, Italy, Switzerland: All cross-border rail service between Italy, Switzerland will be halted from 10 December; long-distance trains between Milan, Frankfurt also affected (Reuters, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:


    *From within the EU:

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days. 

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.

    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: It is possible to stop over at one of the Swiss airports, as long as you do not leave the transit zone of the airport and you can prove that you can continue your journey to your destination country. If you are unable to board your flight and are stuck in an international transit area of an airport, contact the local border control authorities directly. Third country nationals travelling from a Covid risk area, are allowed to transit if they are holding a residence document for their destination country in the Schengen Area and travel through Switzerland to their destination country. Furthermore, those planning to transit Switzerland in their way to their destination country can no longer do so if they depart from one of the countries in Switzerland’s list of high-risk areas.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry Restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as Covid risk area. The Federal Office of Public Health keeps a list of countries concerned, which is updated regularly.

    All travellers entering Switzerland from countries or regions that are defined as Covid risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days.

    If a country is on the list, this includes all of its areas, islands and overseas territories – even if they are not listed separately. Switzerland’s neighbouring countries are exempted from this regulation. In the case of these countries, it is not the entire country that is listed, but rather regions. Further information in this regard can be found on the page Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

    A negative test result does not exempt you from the mandatory quarantine requirement or shorten the quarantine period.

    Travellers that are required to go into quarantine willl be notified during the flight, on board of coaches and at border crossings. They will have to register with the cantonal authorities within two days after arrival, and follow their instructions.

    Airline and travel companies are instructed not to transport sick passengers. The mandatory quarantine requirement does not apply to transit passengers who have spent less than 24 hours in a country or area with an increased risk of infection.
    For updated information, also see the State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) FAQs

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No additional documentation is required.

    Find out more:

    www.bag.admin.ch

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in Switzerland: You should follow the rules on hygiene and social distancing. These include: • Washing your hands regularly and thoroughly; • Keeping a distance of at least 1.5 metres from other people; • If it is not possible to maintain that distance, wear a face mask. Wearing a face mask is compulsory when travelling on public transport, and at Geneva, Zurich and Basel airports. It is compulsory to wear a face mask on all flights to and from Switzerland. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Children under the age of 12 are exempt from this requirement, as are individuals who are unable to wear a mask for medical reasons. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.
    *Public spaces and services: From Saturday 12 December, restaurants, bars, shops, markets, museums, libraries, and sports and leisure facilities will be required to close between 7pm and 6am and, with the exception of restaurants and bars, will not be permitted to open at any time on Sundays and public holidays. Certain cantons with a more favourable epidemiological situation may extend closing time until 11pm. On 24 December and New Year’s Eve, the closing time for restaurants and bars will be 1am. Takeaways and delivery services can remain open until 11pm.
    Events are prohibited, with the exception of religious services (for up to 50 people), funerals attended by family and close friends, parliamentary assemblies and political demonstrations. Sports and cultural activities are restricted to groups of up to five people, with certain exceptions for child, youth and professional sporting and cultural activities. For further information on these measures and exceptions, see the Swiss Government website.
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory in indoor public places such as shops, banks, post offices, museums, libraries and cinemas. Wearing a face mask is also required in outdoor zones where social distancing cannot be observed, including establishments such as markets, shops, venues, restaurants, bars. Failure to do so is punishable by a fine. Further information from the Federal Office of Public Health.
    Gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited in public places; private gatherings are restricted to 10 people. Businesses and public services are open with social distancing measures in place. Eating and drinking in restaurants and bars must be at a table; no more than four people must sit at a table, with the exception of families with children. You may be asked to leave your details (e.g. when visiting bars and restaurants) to enable contact tracing. Cantons have imposed further restrictions, and you should check cantonal websites for further details.

    Read more
    22.12.2020
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    Re-open Europe/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Swiss Authorities/
    Covid Government Page/
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