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New Zealand travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -215.97%
Open for citizens: pcr Open for foreigners: no entry Open for tourism: no entry Quarantine: pcr / iso
Airlines Updates
Published on 09.05.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand to boost contact centre staff as travel demand increases.

Published on 06.05.2022, Air Tahiti Nui:

Air Tahiti Nui celebrates resumption of services ex Auckland.

Published on 05.05.2022, Air Tahiti Nui:

Air Tahiti Nui returns to New Zealand.

Published on 04.05.2022, :

Latest News: Country to start to reopen borders to international travelers 13 April after more than two years of COVID-19 restrictions (BBC, 15.03.2022).

Published on 27.04.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand to build new hangar, move head office to airport.

Published on 19.04.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand resumes service to San Francisco.

Published on 31.03.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand resumes Singapore-Auckland flights.

Published on 29.03.2022, Air New Zealand:

ANZ: International schedule update from July - October 2022

Published on 29.03.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand relaunches direct Boeing 787 flights to San Francisco.

Published on 23.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand launches 17-hour flight to New York City, from 17SEP22.

Published on 17.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand: IATA Travel Pass available international services.

Published on 15.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand reactivates a B777-300(ER).

Published on 14.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand to reactivate 27 international routes in 2022 but still excludes Buenos Aires.

Published on 11.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Published on 11.02.2022, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand relaunches 24 international routes starting from 27MAR22.

Published on 22.12.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand cancels about 120 flights after border reopening plan delayed.

Published on 21.12.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand cancels about 120 flights after government delays border reopening plan

Published on 26.11.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand ready for take-off in January.

Published on 25.11.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand cancels more flights between NZ and Australia for JAN22.

Published on 23.11.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand to cancel more than 1,000 flights through 31DEC21 because of border uncertainty between countries.

Published on 13.11.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air NZ to require vaccine proof or negative test for domestic flights

Published on 28.10.2021, Air New Zealand:

Pacific: Air NZ promises to make regions more accessible by doubling capacity and offering cheaper fares.

Published on 25.10.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand cancels some domestic flights from 2 November to 6 December because of uncertainty of alert level restrictions

Published on 21.10.2021, Air New Zealand, Qantas:

Airlines won't budge on one-way Australia bubble until December.

Published on 19.10.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand To Resume Los Angeles – Sydney Flights on 05NOV21.

Published on 07.10.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand reels from Auckland curbs, Australia bubble loss.

Published on 04.10.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand bans unvaccinated travellers.

Published on 29.09.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand updates its international flight schedules.

Published on 28.09.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand adding quarantine flights between Australia and New Zealand in December.

Published on 21.09.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand further cuts flying to, from Australia until end of Nov-21 after quarantine-free travel suspended for eight weeks.

Published on 07.09.2021, Air New Zealand:

Air New Zealand Drops Sydney Flights in Oct-21

Published on 30.08.2021, Air New Zealand:

ANZ reboots plans for non-stop New York flights

Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 11.08.2021
Air New Zealand cancels flights due to turboprop problems
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300380359/air-new-zealand-cancels-flights-due-to-turboprop-problems
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 01.07.2021
Latest News: New Zealand authorities will lift quarantine-free travel pause with Western Australia and Northern Territory (xinhua, 05.07.2021). New Zealand government extends pause on quarantine-free travel with New South Wales for 12 days beginning 25 June because of COVID-19 (Xinhua, 25.06.2021).
Source:
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 06.07.2021
Air NZ brings back long haul routes it suspended early on in Covid-19 pandemic
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/125670013/air-nz-brings-back-long-haul-routes-it-suspended-early-on-in-covid19-pandemic
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 28.06.2021
ANZ cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 26.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels all passenger flights from Australia after 72-hour pause to quarantine-free travel imposed because of COVID-19
Source: https://www.odt.co.nz/star-news/star-national/blanket-ban-quarantine-free-travel-australia
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 24.06.2021
Air New Zealand will resume direct passenger flights between Auckland and Taoyuan from 4 August
Source: https://focustaiwan.tw/business/202106230012
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 23.06.2021
Air New Zealand cancels direct flights from Christchurch, Queenstown and Wellington to Sydney following new COVID-19 infections
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/125530723/covid19-nz-air-nz-cancels-28-flights-to-australia-following-cluster-in-nsw
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html
Published on 21.05.2021
Waikato DHB cyberattack results in cancelled Air New Zealand flights to and from Samoa.
Source: https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/travel-troubles/300313800/waikato-dhb-cyber-attack-results-in-cancelled-flights-to-and-from-samoa
Published on 18.05.2021
Cook Islands travel bubble: Air New Zealand announces Rarotonga schedule.
Source: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/05/cook-islands-travel-bubble-air-new-zealand-announces-rarotonga-schedule.html

Published on 09.11.2020
Air New Zealand extends suspension of inbound bookings until 14 December

20.10.2020 Air New Zealand in recent schedule update once again filed changes to its planned service to Norfolk Island, during Northern winter 2020/21 season, from 25OCT20 to 27MAR21. Previously reported on Airlineroute in late-September, the Star Alliance carrier has restored 2nd weekly flight on Brisbane – Norfolk Island sector.

Latest adjustment sees the extension of 2nd weekly Brisbane – Norfolk Island flight to late-March 2021, instead of late-January. On Sydney – Norfolk Island service, NZ will restore 2nd weekly flight from 09NOV20.

Brisbane – Norfolk Island 2 weekly A320neo
NZ914 BNE1005 – 1420NLK 32N 26
NZ915 NLK1445 – 1510BNE 32N 5
NZ915 NLK1525 – 1550BNE 32N 2

Sydney – Norfolk Island eff 09NOV20 2nd weekly service restored, A320neo
NZ912 SYD0950 – 1330NLK 32N 5
NZ912 SYD0955 – 1335NLK 32N 1

NZ913 NLK1445 – 1635SYD 32N 1
NZ913 NLK1520 – 1710SYD 32N 6

29.09.2020 Air New Zealand on Friday (25SEP20) filed additional changes for Brisbane – Norfolk Island route, during Northern winter 2020/21 season. Latest adjustment sees the restoration of 2nd weekly flight, operating on Tuesdays from 27OCT20 to 02FEB21. Airbus A320neo aircraft operates this route.

NZ914 BNE1005 – 1420NLK 32N 26
NZ915 NLK1445 – 1510BNE 32N 5
NZ915 NLK1525 – 1550BNE 32N 2

Accompanied by frequency restoration, the airline’s Auckland – Brisbane service will also see restoration of 5th weekly flight, between 26OCT20 and 03FEB21. Revised operation sees NZ operates 4 weekly 787-9 and 1 weekly A320neo service. NZ’s Sydney – Norfolk Island flight will continue to be served once weekly.

Published on 25.09.2020
Air New Zealand restores 2nd weekly Brisbane – Norfolk Island service in NW20

15.09.2020 Jetstar Airways from Thursday 17SEP20 will resume domestic service in New Zealand, according to its latest statement. The following is planned operation for the week of 20SEP20, based on OAG schedules as of 13SEP20.

Auckland – Christchurch 13 weekly
Auckland – Dunedin 5 weekly
Auckland – Queenstown 16 weekly
Auckland – Wellington 9 weekly
Christchurch – Wellington 5 weekly
Queenstown – Wellington 5 weekly

10.09.2020 Air New Zealand in the last few days filed additional changes to its North American operation for Northern winter 2020/21 season, effective 25OCT20. Latest adjustment as of 08SEP20 as follows.

Auckland – Los Angeles 3 weekly 787-9 (Previous plan: 1 daily)
Auckland – San Francisco Service cancelled 15SEP20 – 27MAR21 (Previous plan: 3 weekly 787-9)

Previously reported operation:
Auckland – Apia 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Brisbane 4 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Hong Kong 3 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Melbourne 1 daily 787-9
Auckland – Nadi 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Niue 1 weekly A320neo
Auckland – Nuku’alofa 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Rarotonga 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Seoul Incheon 787-9 departs AKL on following dates: 13NOV20, 04DEC20, 18DEC20, 22JAN21, 19FEB21, 19MAR21
Auckland – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Sydney 8 weekly 787-9/A320neo
Auckland – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-9
Brisbane – Norfolk Island 3 weekly A320neo
Sydney – Norfolk Island 3 weekly A320neo

02.09.2020 Air New Zealand this week gradually filed planned International service for Northern winter 2020/21 season, from 25OCT20 to 27MAR21. Planned operation as of 02SEP20 as follows.

Due to various travel restrictions, there are limitations of passenger traffic rights on certain route, while additional changes remain highly possible.

Auckland – Apia 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Brisbane 4 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Hong Kong 3 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Los Angeles 1 daily 787-9
Auckland – Melbourne 1 daily 787-9
Auckland – Nadi 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Niue 1 weekly A320neo
Auckland – Nuku’alofa 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Rarotonga 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – San Francisco 3 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Seoul Incheon 787-9 departs AKL on following dates: 13NOV20, 04DEC20, 18DEC20, 22JAN21, 19FEB21, 19MAR21
Auckland – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Sydney 8 weekly 787-9/A320neo
Auckland – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-9
Brisbane – Norfolk Island 3 weekly A320neo
Sydney – Norfolk Island 3 weekly A320neo

Published on 26.08.2020
Jetstar suspends domestic NZ service 24AUG – 06SEP20

Published on 21.08.2020
Air New Zealand resumes 2nd weekly Shanghai service from mid-August 2020

19.08.2020 Air New Zealand starting today is adjusting domestic operation to/from Auckland. From 18AUG20 to 26AUG20, the airline’s Auckland COVID19 Alert Level 3 operation as follows.

Auckland – Christchurch 13 weekly
Auckland – Gisborne 3 weekly
Auckland – Kerikeri 7 weekly
Auckland – Napier 3 weekly
Auckland – Palmerston North 3 weekly
Auckland – Tauranga 3 weekly
Auckland – Wellington 7 weekly
Auckland – Whangarei 7 weekly

The airline’s operation to/from Christchurch and Wellington remains unchanged for the moment.

Published on 18.08.2020
Air New Zealand 18-26AUG20 Auckland domestic operations

Published on 15.08.2020
Jetstar Airways suspends all domestic flights in New Zealand until 26 August

Published on 05.08.2020
Air Chathams Aug/Sep 2020 operations

Published on 04.08.2020
Air New Zealand Aug – Oct 2020 Norfolk Island operation

03.08.2020 Jetstar Airways last week announced expanded schedule for domestic service in New Zealand in August 2020, compared to July 2020 schedule. Planned operation for August 2020 includes the following.

Auckland – Christchurch Increase from 24 (weekly in July) to 30 weekly (in August)
Auckland – Dunedin Increase from 3 to 7 weekly
Auckland – Queenstown Increase from 14 to 19 weekly
Auckland – Wellington 27 weekly
Wellington – Christchurch Increase from 7 to 14 weekly
Wellington – Queenstown 7 weekly

29.07.2020 Air New Zealand this week earlier this week adjusted International operation for the remainder of Northern summer 2020 season. From 01SEP20 to 24OCT20, planned operation as follows.

Due to Government advisory, the airline has temporary suspended new bookings on International service into New Zealand at least until 09AUG20, as of 28JUL20. This date may be extended when needed. Ongoing travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s planned operation.

Auckland – Apia 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Brisbane 4 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Hong Kong 3 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Los Angeles 1 daily 787-9
Auckland – Melbourne 1 daily 787-9
Auckland – Nadi 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Niue 1 weekly A320neo
Auckland – Nuku’alofa 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Rarotonga 1 weekly 787-9
Auckland – San Francisco 3 weekly 787-9
Auckland – Seoul Incheon 787-9 departs AKL on 25SEP20 and 16OCT20
Auckland – Sydney 9 weekly 787-9/A320neo
Auckland – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-9

Published on 28.07.2020
Air New Zealand resumes San Francisco service from late-July 2020
Air New Zealand suspends new bookings to Australia

Published on 27.07.2020
Air New Zealand extends hold on bookings into New Zealand until 9 August amid ongoing COVID-19 pandemic

15.07.2020 New Zealand’s regional carrier Sounds Air recently filed planned operation for July and August 2020, as the airline continues to operate reduced frequencies. Planned operation as follows.

Following frequency is based on week of 19JUL20, and may vary on certain weeks.

Christchurch – Blenheim 9 weekly
Paraparaumu – Blenheim 2 weekly
Paraparaumu – Nelson 2 weekly
Wellington – Blenheim 26 weekly
Wellington – Nelson 15 weekly
Wellington – Picton 4 weekly
Wellington – Taupo 4 weekly
Wellington – Westport 6 weekly
Published on 08.07.2020
Air New Zealand limits capacity on inbound international services
New Zealand Halts Bookings for Inbound Flights Amid Reports of Covid-19 Facility Crunch

01.07.2020 Air New Zealand during the month of July and August 2020 expands interim schedule on domestic market, announced by the airline last month. Planned weekly frequencies as follow. Note the airline is offering expanded frequencies for the first 3 weeks of July 2020, as of 28JUN20 OAG schedules.

Auckland – Blenheim 16-19 weekly
Auckland – Christchurch 62-72 weekly
Auckland – Dunedin 13-16 weekly
Auckland – Gisborne 23-24 weekly
Auckland – Invercargill 4 weekly
Auckland – Kerikeri 16-18 weekly
Auckland – Napier 36-37 weekly
Auckland – Nelson 32-45 weekly
Auckland – New Plymouth 24-25 weekly
Auckland – Palmerston North 36-37 weekly
Auckland – Queenstown 47-64 weekly
Auckland – Rotorua 10-11 weekly
Auckland – Tauranga 28-29 weekly
Auckland – Taupo 8-9 weekly
Auckland – Wellington 64-65 weekly
Auckland – Whangarei 17-18 weekly
Christchurch – Dunedin 25-28 weekly
Christchurch – Hamilton 15-21 weekly
Christchurch – Hokitika 8-9 weekly
Christchurch – Invercargill 20-27 weekly
Christchurch – Napier 15-20 weekly
Christchurch – Nelson 25-28 weekly
Christchurch – New Plymouth 7-11 weekly
Christchurch – Palmerston North 19-30 weekly
Christchurch – Queenstown 18-25 weekly
Christchurch – Rotorua 7-14 weekly
Christchurch – Tauranga 10-20 weekly
Christchurch – Wellington 66-78 weekly
Wellington – Blenheim 17-22 weekly
Wellington – Dunedin 19-26 weekly
Wellington – Gisborne 11 weekly
Wellington – Hamilton 27-29 weekly
Wellington – Invercargill 7-9 weekly
Wellington – Napier 16 weekly
Wellington – Nelson 33 weekly
Wellington – New Plymouth 16-17 weekly
Wellington – Queenstown 19-28 weekly
Wellington – Rotorua 16-17 weekly
Wellington – Tauranga 22-28 weekly
Wellington – Timaru 9-14 weekly
Published on 17.06.2020
Air New Zealand resumes Shanghai service from late-June 2020

Published on 15.06.2020
Air New Zealand announces flights to China amid ongoing COVID-19 concerns

Published on 10.06.2020

Air New Zealand resumes Tokyo service from late-June 2020

Sounds Air June/July 2020 operations as of 09JUN20

 

Published on 09.06.2020

Jetstar domestic New Zealand service resumption in July 2020

 

Published on 02.06.2020
Air New Zealand Domestic operations, eff. 01JUN20

Published on 28.05.2020
Air New Zealand July/August 2020 International operations as of 28MAY20

Published on 26.05.2020
Air Chathams resumes various Auckland routes from late-May 2020

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from New Zealand
Crossing Rules

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to partner or dependent child of a national or a permanent resident of New Zealand. Their visa must be based on the relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Cook Isl. on a direct flight operated by Air New Zealand. They must have been in Cook Isl. in the past 14 days.
– This does not apply to passengers who have a visa and have been granted an exemption before departure; details can be found at https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/covid-19/border-closures-and-exceptions/border-entry-requirements .

Passengers must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result. Tests accepted are: antigen, LAMP, PCR and RT-PCR tests. The test must have been taken at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. More details can be found at https://tinyurl.com/39tsn56h .
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Australia, Cook Isl., Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Isl., Micronesia (Federated States), Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Isl., Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu or Wallis and Futuna Isl..
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Antarctica or Tokelau.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 2 years.
– This does not apply to passengers with a medical certificate specifying that the passenger does not have Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms and is not contagious. The certificate must be issued at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Albania, Belize, Dominica, Kenya, Lao People’s Dem. Rep., Montenegro, Myanmar, Slovenia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Tajikistan or Turkmenistan. They must have a medical certificate issued at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point and it must confirm that they have no Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

Forced isolation
Passengers are subject to medical screening and quarantine for 14 days.

Passengers must have a voucher confirming their allocation to a place in managed isolation.

Read more
Flight Restrictions

published 03.11.2020

Total entry ban
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to partners or children of nationals or residents of New Zealand. Their visa must be based on the relationship.

Quarantine

Quarantine requirement at government designated site.
Unvaccinated travellers, and those who do not meet New Zealand’s vaccination requirements, who are eligible to enter New Zealand will be required to enter Managed Isolation and Quarantine.
Fully vaccinated travellers entering New Zealand will not need to self-isolate upon arrival. Eligible travellers entering New Zealand will be given a pack of rapid antigen tests (RATs) with instructions for use, at the airport. Please see New Zealand Government COVID-19 for full details.

Read more
Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.
From 1 April 2022 travellers arriving into New Zealand by air must complete the Traveller Declaration and be issued a New Zealand Traveller Pass before travelling to New Zealand. Start your declaration as soon as you can, to ensure you have time to complete it before you travel. Travellers will need to provide:
• Passport details
• Flight information
• Proof of vaccination
• Proof of a negative pre-departure test (PDT)
• Travel history for 14 days prior to arriving in New Zealand
• Contact details in New Zealand
• Emergency contact details.
Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have evidence of a negative COVID-19 result shortly before your flight from 48 hours prior to departure. Please go to the New Zealand COVID-19 website for types of accepted COVID-19 tests and timeframes before departure.

Read more
Vaccination
COVID-19 Total Vaccination date: 2022-05-19
COVID-19 Total Vaccination: 11071365
COVID-19 Daily Vaccination: 1302
COVID-19 Vacc. (per 100 citizens, %): 215.97
COVID-19 Daily Vacc. (per 1 million citizens): 254

Non-New Zealand citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 35 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. Difference vaccines require a different number of doses to be considered a full course. Check the New Zealand COVID-19 website for full vaccination requirements.

If you are a non-New Zealand Citizen, you must present proof that you have been fully vaccinated to enter New Zealand if you are aged 17 years or over. You will need to upload proof of your vaccination status to your New Zealand Traveller Declaration. You need a digital vaccine passport or another form of electronic or paper document from a government health authority confirming you have had a full COVID-19 vaccine course.
You must meet COVID-19 vaccination requirements to travel to New Zealand, even if you have had COVID-19. You must have had a full course of any of the COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a government health authority or approval authority.
*Children aged 16 and under are exempt from the vaccination requirement to enter New Zealand. Children aged 2 years (24 months) and under are exempt from taking a pre-departure test. Children over the age of 2 years (24 months) will need evidence of a negative pre-departure test.

Read more

Full Restrictions

  • New Zealand The full reopening was scheduled to occur in October, but the government already indicated in April that they would try to speed up the reopening if possible.

    New Zealand will also welcome cruise ships from July 31.
    Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern today announced a major package of reforms, which include an early opening of New Zealand’s border and a simplification of immigration settings, to address the immediate skill shortages in New Zealand and speed up the economic recovery from COVID-19.

    “New Zealand is in demand and now fully open for business,” Jacinda Ardern said.

    “New Zealand’s international border will reopen to all tourists and visa holders two months earlier than planned on 31 July.

    “This will be welcome news for families, businesses and our migrant communities. It also provides certainty and good preparation time for airlines and cruise ship companies planning a return to New Zealand in the peak spring and summer seasons.

    “We know a major constraint on business is access to skilled labour. This plan will increase the available pool of labour, while also speeding up our tourism recovery.

    “This follows our previous reconnecting work which has seen approvals granted for over 29,000 critical workers, 5,000 students, working holidaymakers, Australian tourists, and visa-waiver visitors already able to enter the country.

    “By helping to relieve urgent skills shortages, opening up tourism and putting our immigration settings on a more secure footing, we are building on our proven plan to secure New Zealand’s economic future,” Jacinda Ardern said.

    The Government has also announced new rebalanced immigration settings which will help businesses access the key skills they need while ensuring wages and working conditions are improved for everyone.

    “New Zealand cannot return to pre pandemic trends that saw us overly reliant on growing numbers of lower-skilled workers and resulted in the increased exploitation of migrants,” Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said.

    “Our plan is to grow skills at home. Over the past two years, over 190,000 New Zealanders have benefitted from Government investment in trades training, including apprenticeships. On Monday we announced an extension to the Apprenticeship Boost scheme which will see a further 38,000 New Zealanders supported into a trade.

    “The cornerstone of our rebalance is the new Green List which will incentivise and attract high skilled migrants to New Zealand, by providing a new streamlined pathway to residency for those globally hard to fill roles. The list features 85 hard to fill roles including construction engineering, trades, health workers and tech.

    “Our rebalanced immigration system will be simpler, reducing categories, bringing more online accessibility and streamlining application processes for businesses.

    “Through the Accredited Employer Work Visa, employers won’t need to provide as much information, can use their own recruitment processes to prove no New Zealanders are available for work, and Immigration New Zealand will endeavour to have these visas processed within 30 days once an employer is accredited.

    “We have worked closely with businesses on these reforms and understand that for some sectors it will take time to transition away from a reliance on cheap migrant labour.

    “The Government recognises that shift for some sectors is more challenging than others by establishing new sector agreements to assist with the transition. They will provide access for specified sectors to lower-paid migrant workers, and all those employers can continue to hire working holidaymakers at any wage.

    “The tourism and hospitality industries in particular have been hit hard by the pandemic. The Government has agreed to temporarily exempt tourism and hospitality businesses from paying the median wage to recruit migrants on an Accredited Employer Work Visa into most roles. Instead, a lower wage threshold of $25 per hour will be required until April 2023. This follows the recent $27 per hour border exception that was granted around certain snow season roles to help the sector prepare for winter tourists.

    “New sector agreements for the care; construction and infrastructure; meat processing; seafood; and seasonal snow and adventure tourism sectors will provide for a short-term or ongoing need for access to lower-paid migrants.

    “We’re also announcing today that around 20,000 visa holders with visas expiring before 2023 are being granted either a six-month extension or a new two-year visa with open work conditions, so they and their employers won’t be affected by this changes and we can keep the skills we need within the country,” Kris Faafoi said.

    Education Minister Chris Hipkins said the full reopening is a significant milestone for the international education sector, which can now start to rebuild sustainably, with a big focus on value and by attracting genuine students.

    “More than 5000 international students have already been confirmed for entry as part of previous border exemptions, which means they can be here by mid-July. From the end of July, all international students who meet normal entry criteria can enrol for study here,” Chris Hipkins said.

    “But the future will be different, we won’t be going back to National’s volume over value approach that became a backdoor to residency for lower-skilled and lower-paid migrant workers, who were then at risk of exploitation.

    “Changes we’re announcing today seek to attract students to New Zealand to learn, while also shutting the backdoor route to residency,” Chris Hipkins said.

    These changes include:

    Students in non-degree level courses will not get post-study work rights except where they are studying and then working in specified shortage and skilled occupations
    For degree-level and other eligible international students the length of time they can work after their studies will mirror the time they study in New Zealand. Currently some students can work for up to three years after just 30 weeks’ study. Masters and PhD students will retain the right to work in New Zealand for up to three years after their studies
    Students will also not be able to apply for a second post-study visa in New Zealand.
    “New Zealand has a strong international education brand and is universally regarded as a place that students want to come to study. It enriches us as well as connecting us to the world, and strengthens our reputation offshore,” Chris Hipkins said.

    Tourism Minister Stuart Nash said the decision to bring the final border opening date forward allows us to fully reconnect to the world of international tourists and business travellers in time for our traditional peak visitor season.

    “Our wider tourism sector is on the way to recovery. We will be fully open to the world in mid-winter, traditionally our quietest period for visitors. Bringing forward the date allows prospective travellers to apply for visitor visas well ahead of time before taking the next step to book a flight or a cruise for future travel,” Stuart Nash said.

    “Approximately 90 per cent of cruise visits are during the warmer months of October to April, and summer is our bumper tourism season overall. Today’s announcement means it’s full steam ahead for the industry who can plan with certainty for the rest of the year and beyond.”

    Read more
    11.05.2022
  • New Zealand Latest News: Country to start to reopen borders to international travelers 13 April after more than two years of COVID-19 restrictions (BBC, 15.03.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 entry restrictions: New Zealand’s borders are re-opening throughout 2022. The New Zealand Government’s 5-step plan to re-open its borders, phased by country and visa status, commenced on 27 February 2022.
    See the New Zealand Government’s COVID-19 website for further guidance on entry requirements. If the phased border re-opening does not yet apply to you, you may still be able to travel to New Zealand if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Visit the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    From 1 April 2022 travellers arriving into New Zealand by air must complete the Traveller Declaration and be issued a New Zealand Traveller Pass before travelling to New Zealand. Start your declaration as soon as you can, to ensure you have time to complete it before you travel. Travellers will need to provide:
    • Passport details
    • Flight information
    • Proof of vaccination
    • Proof of a negative pre-departure test (PDT)
    • Travel history for 14 days prior to arriving in New Zealand
    • Contact details in New Zealand
    • Emergency contact details.
    You need to show your Traveller Pass when you check-in at the airport, and to Customs when you arrive in New Zealand. It can be printed out or saved on your mobile device. See the New Zealand Government’s Traveller Declaration website for further information.
    *All travellers: You do not need a visa to enter New Zealand as a visitor for up to 6 months, but you will need to get a New Zealand Electronic Travel Authority (NZeTA) before you travel. The New Zealand Government, have commenced a 5-step reopening plan. Visit the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for full border re-opening requirements.
    The NZeTA costs NZD $9 if applying via the dedicated mobile app, or NZD $12 if completed online. You will also need to pay an International Visitor Conservation and Tourism Levy (IVL) of NZD $35 when you apply. Once issued, the NZeTA is valid for up to two years. The New Zealand immigration authorities recommend that applicants allow up to 72 hours for processing.
    On arrival in New Zealand, you will also need to satisfy the Immigration Officer that you meet the criteria for visa-free entry, which includes having an onward ticket and sufficient funds to support you during your stay. You can check the full criteria on the New Zealand Immigration website. New Zealand’s immigration rules are strict, particularly regarding employment. Visitors cannot work in New Zealand.
    For more information about visas, visit the New Zealand Immigration website or contact the nearest New Zealand High Commission.
    *If you’re fully vaccinated: Non-New Zealand citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 35 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. Difference vaccines require a different number of doses to be considered a full course. Check the New Zealand COVID-19 website for full vaccination requirements.
    Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have evidence of a negative COVID-19 result shortly before your flight from 48 hours prior to departure. Please go to the New Zealand COVID-19 website for types of accepted COVID-19 tests and timeframes before departure. Fully vaccinated travellers entering New Zealand will not need to self-isolate upon arrival. Eligible travellers entering New Zealand will be given a pack of rapid antigen tests (RATs) with instructions for use, at the airport. Please see New Zealand Government COVID-19 for full details.
    *Proof of vaccination status: If you are a non-New Zealand Citizen, you must present proof that you have been fully vaccinated to enter New Zealand if you are aged 17 years or over. You will need to upload proof of your vaccination status to your New Zealand Traveller Declaration.
    You need a digital vaccine passport or another form of electronic or paper document from a government health authority confirming you have had a full COVID-19 vaccine course. New Zealand will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. For full details, visit the New Zealand Government website. Your evidence must confirm your last dose was at least 14 days before departure for New Zealand.
    Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    You should check that your first name and your surname on your passport match how they are displayed by your COVID Pass at least 2 weeks before you travel. If the names are different, contact your GP practice to have your details updated.
    *Residents of the Cook Islands: The current quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time. You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    You need to spend 10 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands, meaning you can travel on day 11 onwards. Travellers from the Cook Islands are exempt from the New Zealand Government COVID-19 pre-departure testing requirements.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    *If you’re not fully vaccinated: Only those with an exemption or who meet one of the following criteria do not need to have evidence that they have met COVID-19 vaccination requirements:
    • a New Zealand Citizen
    • aged 16 years and under
    • cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons – you will need electronic or paper evidence from a medical practitioner
    • a refugee arriving in New Zealand for the first time
    • a citizen of Afghanistan and you have been evacuated
    • are arriving from Antarctica
    For details on who is eligible to apply and how to apply for an exemption please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    Some travellers may be able to get an exemption if they are travelling to New Zealand from a country with no, or limited access to COVID-19 vaccines. See the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Unvaccinated travellers, and those who do not meet New Zealand’s vaccination requirements, who are eligible to enter New Zealand will be required to enter Managed Isolation and Quarantine.
    *If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year: You must meet COVID-19 vaccination requirements to travel to New Zealand, even if you have had COVID-19. You must have had a full course of any of the COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a government health authority or approval authority.
    *Children aged 16 and under are exempt from the vaccination requirement to enter New Zealand. Children aged 2 years (24 months) and under are exempt from taking a pre-departure test. Children over the age of 2 years (24 months) will need evidence of a negative pre-departure test.
    *If you’re transiting through New Zealand: Transiting is when you pass through one country on the way to your final destination.
    People from visa waiver nationalities on a transit visa waiver transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).
    *Exemptions: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is reopening in a phased approach if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at Red and Orange; at Green it is strongly encouraged to wear a mask in public indoor settings. Detailed guidance on face mask use, and the current traffic light setting, can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    For domestic flights within New Zealand, airlines may require you to show proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination status or a negative COVID-19 test result before boarding. The test must be taken no more than 72 hours before your journey.
    Before you travel domestically within New Zealand, make sure you check the COVID-19 requirements with your transport provider.
    The New Zealand Government does not currently require people to keep track of their movements to help with contact tracing. However, the New Zealand COVID-19 Tracer app is still available to download for this purpose with many shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. You can find out more about scanning and contact tracing here.
    Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally
    COVID-19 public health measures and restrictions may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.You can monitor levels, and whether New Zealand or the area you are visiting within New Zealand is at Green, Orange, or Red on the COVID-19 Protection Framework, by reviewing the
    New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for the latest information. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    If you are 12 years or older and have had one or more doses of vaccine in New Zealand you can apply for the domestic ‘My Vaccine Pass’ which can be used to access events or venues in New Zealand that may require proof of your vaccination status. You may apply to have some COVID-19 vaccinations administered overseas entered into My Vaccine Pass. Further information is available on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, also known as traffic light settings, public health measures may include all or some of the following, on a mandatory or voluntary basis:
    • Record keeping
    • Use of the My Vaccine Pass
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people in public indoor settings
    • Physical distancing
    • Testing and isolation
    • Mask use in public indoor settings. Restrictions on schools, business, and recreational activities
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas
    Requirements may differ by location. Please check the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for status updates.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    04.05.2022
  • New Zealand New Zealand Now Open For Visitors From 60 Visa Waiver Countries With Three Covid Tests.
    New Zealand is back on the world map for international tourism and business travellers as the country opens up to visitors from around 60 visa-waiver countries who enjoy freer travel here from today.

    Tourism Minister Stuart Nash and Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi say the welcome mat is out for citizens of visa-waiver nations, who like Australians can now travel here without isolation if they are vaccinated and do a pre-departure and arrival test for COVID-19.

    “Thousands of passengers are touching down today on around 25 flights at Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch international airports as New Zealand opens up further for business,” said Stuart Nash.

    “Our Reconnecting Strategy is about even more than reuniting family and friends, it is a crucial part of strengthening our economic recovery. We are a safe place to visit, and in a world still battling COVID-19, travellers will be discerning about where they go.

    “Today marks a milestone for visitors from our key northern hemisphere markets in the USA, UK, Germany, South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Canada and others, who can now jump on a plane to come here.

    “Direct flights arrive today from places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, as well as airports closer to home in Australia, Nadi, and Rarotonga. Many will be connecting flights bringing people from further afield.

    “We are currently seeing around 33,000 arrivals per week and we know today’s changes will further boost arrivals as interest in travel to New Zealand remains high. International flight searches to NZ are running 19 per cent higher than pre-COVID (March-April 2019).

    “Later this year major international airlines like Emirates, Air Canada, Malaysian Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, LATAM Airlines and Air Tahiti Nui are restarting routes. Air NZ is also adding long haul routes from San Francisco, Honolulu, Houston, New York and Chicago.

    “Our tourism destinations are amongst the world’s best. The industry knows there is a rebuild ahead. International travel will be very competitive and airlines will take time to build up their schedules and routes.

    “However today is a day to celebrate, and is a big moment in our reconnection with the world,” said Stuart Nash.

    “The further phased opening up of New Zealand’s borders to visa waiver countries builds on earlier steps to welcome back overseas travellers,” said Kris Faafoi.

    “Thousands more visa-waiver travellers and those with existing visitor visas will be able to join vaccinated Australian visitors, temporary work visa holders, and student visa holders who still meet their visa requirements, who are already able to come to New Zealand.

    “This adds to our re-opening plans which mean up to 5,000 international students are able to come to here for the second semester of the academic year.

    “We have also accepted over 6,000 applications in just a few weeks from young people seeking Working Holiday Visas since March. They will not only have a great time on holiday here but can work to support our tourism, hospitality and horticultural sectors.

    “The government continues to review New Zealand’s Reconnecting strategy to see if and when it might be possible to bring forward final steps of the Reconnecting plan sooner than previously signalled,” Kris Faafoi said.
    Most travellers aged 2 and over must provide proof of a negative result from one of the following:

    PCR test — your swab must be taken and your negative test result returned no more than 48 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand
    supervised rapid antigen test (RAT) — your swab must be taken and your negative test result returned no more than 24 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand
    supervised loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test — your swab must be taken and your negative test result returned no more than 24 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand.
    Supervised tests must be done in the presence of a health professional, for example a medical practitioner, nurse or pharmacist.

    After Arrival Test Requirements:
    Testing requirements after arriving in New Zealand

    Vaccinated and eligible travellers entering New Zealand must take 2 rapid antigen tests (RAT) after they arrive. Find out what you need to do.

    When to do your RAT

    Vaccinated and eligible travellers entering New Zealand will be given a pack of rapid antigen tests (RATs), with instructions, at the airport.

    You must take 2 tests.

    Take a test on:

    Day 0/1, when you arrive in New Zealand, and
    Day 5/6.
    Children under 6 months do not need to self-test on arrival.

    Visa-Waiver Countries:
    Andorra
    Argentina
    Austria
    Bahrain
    Belgium
    Brazil
    Brunei
    Bulgaria
    Canada
    Chile
    Croatia
    Cyprus
    Czech Republic
    Denmark
    Estonia (citizens only)
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Greece
    Hong Kong (residents with HKSAR or British National–Overseas passports only)
    Hungary
    Iceland
    Ireland
    Israel
    Italy
    Japan
    Korea, South
    Kuwait
    Latvia (citizens only)
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania (citizens only)
    Luxembourg
    Macau (only if you have a Macau Special Administrative Region passport)
    Malaysia
    Malta
    Mauritius
    Mexico
    Monaco
    Netherlands
    Norway
    Oman
    Poland
    Portugal (if you have the right to live permanently in Portugal)
    Qatar
    Romania
    San Marino
    Saudi Arabia
    Seychelles
    Singapore
    Slovak Republic
    Slovenia
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    Taiwan (if you are a permanent resident)
    United Arab Emirates
    United Kingdom (UK) (if you are travelling on a UK or British passport that shows you have the right to reside permanently in the UK)
    United States of America (USA) (including USA nationals)
    Uruguay
    Vatican City

    Read more
    02.05.2022
  • New Zealand Latest News: Country to start to reopen borders to international travelers 13 April after more than two years of COVID-19 restrictions (BBC, 15.03.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *All travellers: You do not need a visa to enter New Zealand as a visitor for up to 6 months, but you will need to get a New Zealand Electronic Travel Authority (NZeTA) before you travel. The New Zealand Government, have commenced a 5-step reopening plan. Visit the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for full border re-opening requirements.
    The NZeTA costs NZD $9 if applying via the dedicated mobile app, or NZD $12 if completed online. You will also need to pay an International Visitor Conservation and Tourism Levy (IVL) of NZD $35 when you apply. Once issued, the NZeTA is valid for up to two years. The New Zealand immigration authorities recommend that applicants allow up to 72 hours for processing.
    On arrival in New Zealand, you will also need to satisfy the Immigration Officer that you meet the criteria for visa-free entry, which includes having an onward ticket and sufficient funds to support you during your stay. You can check the full criteria on the New Zealand Immigration website.
    New Zealand’s immigration rules are strict, particularly regarding employment. Visitors cannot work in New Zealand.
    For more information about visas, visit the New Zealand Immigration website or contact the nearest New Zealand High Commission .
    If you’re fully vaccinated: Non-New Zealand citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 35 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. Difference vaccines require a different number of doses to be considered a full course. Check the New Zealand COVID-19 website for full vaccination requirements.
    Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have evidence of a negative COVID-19 result shortly before your flight from 48 hours prior to departure. Please go to the New Zealand COVID-19 website for types of accepted COVID-19 tests and timeframes before departure. Fully vaccinated travellers entering New Zealand will not need to self-isolate upon arrival. Eligible travellers entering New Zealand will be given a pack of rapid antigen tests (RATs) with instructions
    for use, at the airport. Please see New Zealand Government COVID-19 for full details.
    Proof of vaccination status: If you are a non-New Zealand Citizen, you must present proof that you have been fully vaccinated to enter New Zealand if you are aged 17 years or over. You will need to upload proof of your vaccination status to your New Zealand Traveller Declaration.
    You need a digital vaccine passport or another form of electronic or paper document from a government health authority confirming you have had a full COVID-19 vaccine course. New Zealand will accept the proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. For full details, visit the New Zealand Government website . Your evidence must confirm your last dose was at least 14 days before departure for New Zealand. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    You should check that your first name and your surname on your passport match how they are displayed by your COVID Pass at least 2 weeks before you travel. If the names are different, contact your GP practice to have your details updated.
    Residents of the Cook Islands: The current quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    You need to spend 10 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands, meaning you can travel on day 11 onwards. Travellers from the Cook Islands are exempt from the New Zealand Government COVID-19 pre-departure testing requirements.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    If you’re not fully vaccinated: Only those with an exemption or who meet one of the following criteria do not need to have evidence that they have met COVID-19 vaccination requirements:
    • a New Zealand Citizen
    • aged 16 years and under
    • cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons – you will need electronic or paper evidence from a medical practitioner
    • a refugee arriving in New Zealand for the first time
    • a citizen of Afghanistan and you have been evacuated
    • are arriving from Antarctica
    For details on who is eligible to apply and how to apply for an exemption please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    Some travellers may be able to get an exemption if they are travelling to New Zealand from a country with no, or limited access to COVID-19 vaccines. See the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Unvaccinated travellers, and those who do not meet New Zealand’s vaccination requirements, who are eligible to enter New Zealand will be required to enter Managed Isolation and Quarantine.
    If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year: You must meet COVID-19 vaccination requirements to travel to New Zealand, even if you have had COVID-19.
    You must have had a full course of any of the COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a government health authority or approval authority.
    Children and young people: Children aged 16 and under are exempt from the vaccination requirement to enter New Zealand. Children aged 2 years (24 months) and under are exempt from taking a pre-departure test. Children over the age of 2 years (24 months) will need evidence of a negative pre-departure test.
    If you’re transiting through New Zealand: Transiting is when you pass through one country on the way to your final destination.
    People from visa waiver nationalities on a transit visa waiver transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits .
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).
    Exemptions: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is reopening in a phased approach if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at Red and Orange; at Green it is strongly encouraged to wear a mask in public indoor settings. Detailed guidance on face mask use, and the current traffic light setting, can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    For domestic flights within New Zealand, airlines may require you to show proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination status or a negative COVID-19 test result before boarding. The test must be taken no more than 72 hours before your journey.
    Before you travel domestically within New Zealand, make sure you check the COVID-19 requirements with your transport provider.
    The New Zealand Government does not currently require people to keep track of their movements to help with contact tracing. However, the New Zealand COVID-19 Tracer app is still available to download for this purpose with many shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. You can find out more about scanning and contact tracing here.
    Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally
    COVID-19 public health measures and restrictions may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.You can monitor levels, and whether New Zealand or the area you are visiting within New Zealand is at Green, Orange, or Red on the COVID-19 Protection Framework, by reviewing the
    New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for the latest information. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    If you are 12 years or older and have had one or more doses of vaccine in New Zealand you can apply for the domestic ‘My Vaccine Pass’ which can be used to access events or venues in New Zealand that may require proof of your vaccination status. You may apply to have some COVID-19 vaccinations administered overseas entered into My Vaccine Pass. Further information is available on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, also known as traffic light settings, public health measures may include all or some of the following, on a mandatory or voluntary basis:
    • Record keeping
    • Use of the My Vaccine Pass
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people in public indoor settings
    • Physical distancing
    • Testing and isolation
    • Mask use in public indoor settings. Restrictions on schools, business, and recreational activities
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas
    Requirements may differ by location. Please check the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for status updates.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    13.04.2022
  • New Zealand The country will welcome fully vaccinated visitors from Australia (Australian citizens & permanent residents) from April 13, visitors from visa-waiver countries, and those already holding a valid visa from May 2, 2022.

    You can New Zealand’s page for visitor information here.

    Test Requirements:
    Visitors need to have a negative Covid-19 pre-departure test performed using one of the following three methods:

    a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test administered no more than 48 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand, or
    supervised rapid antigen test (RAT) no more than 24 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand, or
    a supervised loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) test no more than 24 hours before the scheduled departure of your first international flight to New Zealand.
    + Rapid Antigen Tests (RAT) on days 0/1 and 5/6 after arriving in the country.

    Visa-Waiver Countries:
    Andorra
    Argentina
    Austria
    Bahrain
    Belgium
    Brazil
    Brunei
    Bulgaria
    Canada
    Chile
    Croatia
    Cyprus
    Czech Republic
    Denmark
    Estonia (citizens only)
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Greece
    Hong Kong (residents with HKSAR or British National–Overseas passports only)
    Hungary
    Iceland
    Ireland
    Israel
    Italy
    Japan
    Korea, South
    Kuwait
    Latvia (citizens only)
    Liechtenstein
    Lithuania (citizens only)
    Luxembourg
    Macau (only if you have a Macau Special Administrative Region passport)
    Malaysia
    Malta
    Mauritius
    Mexico
    Monaco
    Netherlands
    Norway
    Oman
    Poland
    Portugal (if you have the right to live permanently in Portugal)
    Qatar
    Romania
    San Marino
    Saudi Arabia
    Seychelles
    Singapore
    Slovak Republic
    Slovenia
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    Taiwan (if you are a permanent resident)
    United Arab Emirates
    United Kingdom (UK) (if you are travelling on a UK or British passport that shows you have the right to reside permanently in the UK)
    United States of America (USA) (including USA nationals)
    Uruguay
    Vatican City

    Read more
    16.03.2022
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand authorities will reopen borders in phases from 27 February (Reuters, 02.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *All travellers: You do not need a visa to enter New Zealand as a visitor for up to 6 months, but you will need to get a New Zealand Electronic Travel Authority (NZeTA) before you travel. The New Zealand Government, following a temporary border closure, announced 3 February 2022 a 5-step reopening plan commencing at 11:59pm (New Zealand Time) on 27 February 2022. Please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for full border re-opening requirements.
    The NZeTA costs NZD $9 if applying via the dedicated mobile app, or NZD $12 if completed online. You will also need to pay an International Visitor Conservation and Tourism Levy (IVL) of NZD $35 when you apply. Once issued, the NZeTA is valid for up to two years. The New Zealand immigration authorities recommend that applicants allow up to 72 hours for processing.
    On arrival in New Zealand, you will also need to satisfy the Immigration Officer that you meet the criteria for visa-free entry, which includes having an onward ticket and sufficient funds to support you during your stay. You can check the full criteria on the New Zealand Immigration website. New Zealand’s immigration rules are strict, particularly regarding employment. Visitors cannot work in New Zealand.
    For more information about visas, visit the New Zealand Immigration website or contact the nearest New Zealand High Commission.
    *If you’re fully vaccinated: Non-New Zealand citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 33 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand.
    Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have a negative PCR or RT-PCR test result in the 48 hours prior to departure and spend time in self-isolation Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ). On 3 February 2022, the New Zealand Government announced a reopening in a phased approach, staged by country of departure and visa category, for fully vaccinated travellers to enter New Zealand without going into managed isolation and quarantine commencing from 11:59pm (New Zealand Time) on 27 February 2022. All travellers will initially be required to self-isolate for a period of 10 days. Please see New Zealand Government COVID-19 for full details.
    *Proof of vaccination status: You must present proof that you have been fully vaccinated to enter New Zealand.
    New Zealand will accept the proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. You need a digital vaccine passport or another form of electronic or paper document from a government health authority confirming you have had a full COVID-19 vaccine course. For full details, please see the New Zealand Government website. Your evidence must confirm your last dose was at least 14 days before departure for New Zealand.
    Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status. You should check that your first name and your surname on your passport match how they are displayed by your COVID Pass at least 2 weeks before you travel. If the names are different, contact your GP practice to have your details updated.
    *Residents of the Cook Islands: The current quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline. You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. Travellers from the Cook Islands are exempt from the New Zealand Government COVID-19 pre-departure testing requirements.For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    *If you’re not fully vaccinated: Only those with an exemption or are a New Zealand Citizen, are aged 16 years, a refugee or a citizen of Afghanistan and you have been evacuated, do not need to have evidence you have met COVID-19 vaccination requirements. For details on who is eligible to apply and how to apply for an exemption please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    From 11:50pm (New Zealand Time) 27 February 2022 unvaccinated travellers, and those who do not meet New Zealand’s vaccination requirements, who are eligible to enter New Zealand will continue to enter Managed Isolation and Quarantine.
    *If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year: You must meet COVID-19 vaccination requirements to travel to New Zealand, even if you have had COVID-19. You must have had a full course of any of the COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a government health authority or approval authority.
    *Children and young people: Children aged 16 and under are exempt from the vaccination requirement to enter New Zealand. Children aged 2 years (24 months) and under are exempt from taking a pre-departure test. Children over the age of 2 years (24 months) will need evidence of a negative pre-departure test.
    *If you’re transiting through New Zealand: Transiting is when you pass through one country on the way to your final destination. People from visa waiver nationalities on a transit visa waiver transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).
    *Exemptions: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: COVID-19 restrictions in New Zealand are subject to change at short notice and can apply regionally or nationally. You can find detailed information on current COVID-19 levels and the restriction measures that are being enforced on the New Zealand Government website
    .
    At 11:59pm(NZT) on 2 December 2021 New Zealand moved into the new COVID-19 Protection Framework, a traffic light system of Green, Orange, and Red. More information is available on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website. At all levels, record keeping and scanning is mandatory, and evidence of vaccination is incentivised for business and public venues and events. Localised lockdowns may still be used as part of New Zealand’s public health response, so you should plan for disruption.
    *Coronavirus travel health: Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for New Zealand on the TravelHealthPro website. See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Check the current New Zealand COVID-19 restrictions and requirements.
    *Entry and borders: New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place, but will be easing in three steps from 16 January 2022. Public health measures remain in place under the COVID-19 Protection Framework (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, physical distancing, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in New Zealand.
    On 17 November 2021, the New Zealand Government launched its International Travel Vaccination Certificate, for people aged 12 years and over who have had a vaccine dose administered in New Zealand. If you have been vaccinated in New Zealand, you may request a digital vaccination certificate from the New Zealand Ministry of Health, which will be accepted at the UK border. If you previously received a vaccination confirmation letter from the New Zealand Ministry of Health this will be accepted during this transitional period. Please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for further information.
    *Other specific country and airline restrictions: Travel restrictions may be by imposed by other transit hubs. We advise you to check with your airline before travelling in case of any related disruption to airline schedules caused by the new restrictions.
    Some airlines have mandatory pre-departure PCR COVID-19 testing requirements, even for transit passengers. You should contact your individual airline for further information. The British High Commission in Wellington and Consulate General in Auckland are unable to offer certification or a negative test result. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the Healthpoint website for further information on accessing medical services.
    Face-coverings are required by legislation on all New Zealand domestic flights. Air New Zealand also requires travellers aged 12 years and 3 months or older on domestic flights between 14 December 2021 and 31 March 2022 to provide proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test. The InterIslander Cook Strait ferry service between the North and South Islands will also require proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test from 15 December 2021.
    Air New Zealand now requires all passengers to wear a face-covering on international flights. From 1 February 2022, Air New Zealand will require customers travelling anywhere on its international network to be fully vaccinated.
    Please see the Air New Zealand website and theInterIslander website for further information.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required. For domestic flights within New Zealand from 15 December 2021, you must either be fully vaccinated, or have a negative COVID-19 test result from a test administered no more than 72 hours before your flight.
    Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The Government also requires people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID-19 Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    *Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally: COVID-19 public health measures and restrictions may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.
    You can monitor levels, and whether New Zealand or the area you are visiting within New Zealand is at Green, Orange, or Red on the COVID-19 Protection Framework, by reviewing the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for the latest information where you are. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    You may require evidence of vaccination for entry into business and premises in New Zealand. If you are over 12 years old and have had one or more doses of vaccine in New Zealand you can apply for the domestic ‘My Vaccine Pass’. You may apply to have some COVID-19 vaccinations administered overseas entered into My Vaccine Pass, further information is available on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, the fully vaccinated can expect greater freedoms in New Zealand, but public health measures may still include:
    • Mandatory record keeping
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people at non-work gatherings, in shops, cafes, restaurants and other places of public gathering, and on visitors to private residences, both indoors and outdoors. (Numbers and settings may depend on the use of vaccination certificates.)
    • Physical distancing of 2 metres from people you do not know when out in public or in retail stores and 1 metre physical distancing in controlled environments like workplaces, where practicable
    • Restrictions on domestic transport, inter regional travel and use of public transport
    • Restrictions on schools, business, and recreational activities
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas

    Read more
    11.02.2022
  • New Zealand The New Zealand border will reopen to vaccinated Kiwis and other current eligible travellers from Australia at 11.59pm on 27 February and to the same groups from the rest of the world only two weeks later on 13 March, COVID-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins and Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi announced today.

    The Government’s reconnecting plan will see all New Zealanders and key visa holders able to start to enter the country over the coming three months, assisting with the economic recovery and immediately address worker shortages.

    “This is a very carefully developed plan that replaces MIQ for the vast majority of travellers while ensuring we maintain ongoing measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in our community from recent arrivals,” Chris Hipkins said.

    “With 94 percent of our population fully vaccinated, and 92 percent of those over 18 now eligible for a booster by the end of February it’s time to shift gears in our COVID-19 response to focus on reconnection and recovery.

    “By reducing the gap to get boosted to three months we’re ensuring we reach our highest possible boosted rates before fully reopening.

    “By the time we start to reopen our border, we’ll be one of the most vaccinated and most boosted countries in the world and the COVID-19 Protection Framework will be well established in helping to manage COVID outbreaks.

    “Our plan has built in protections to help manage risks such as future variants. A phased approach to reopening reduces the risk of a surge of cases, while prioritising the return of New Zealanders and much needed entry of skilled workers.

    “Having MIQ for every traveller was a temporary setting for when none of us had protection. New Zealanders need to reconnect with one another. Families and friends need to reunite. Our businesses need skills to grow. Exporters need to travel to make new connections,” Chris Hipkins said.

    Steps
    STEP TIMING TRAVELLERS
    STEP 1 From 11.59pm, Sunday 27 February 2022
    Reopen to New Zealanders and other eligible travellers under current border settings (e.g. people with border exceptions) from Australia
    STEP 2 From 11:59 pm, Sunday 13 March 2022
    Reopen to New Zealanders and other eligible travellers under current border settings from the rest of the world
    Open to skilled workers earning at least 1.5 times the median wage
    Open to Working Holiday Scheme visas
    STEP 3 From 11:59 pm, Tuesday 12 April 2022
    Open to current offshore temporary visa holders, who can still meet the relevant visa requirements,
    Open to up to 5000 international students for semester two
    Further class exceptions for critical workforces that do not meet the 1.5 times the median wage test will be considered
    STEP 4 By July 2022
    Open to anyone from Australia
    Open for visa-waiver travel
    The Accredited Employer Work Visa will open, meaning the skilled and health worker border exception can be phased out
    STEP 5 October 2022
    Border fully reopens to visitors from anywhere in the world, and all visa categories fully reopen.
    Steps 1 and 2
    “From 27 February, vaccinated New Zealanders and eligible travellers from Australia will be able to enter New Zealand without staying in MIQ and two weeks later from 13 March, New Zealanders and eligible travellers from the rest of the world will be able to come home,” Chris Hipkins said.

    “While travellers will no longer need to stay in MIQ we are maintaining border measures to reduce the spread of the virus.

    “The self-isolation requirements for travellers will mirror the way we treat contacts of cases in New Zealand. That means a current requirement of 10 days, but that will drop to 7 days when we move to phase two of our pandemic plan as cases rise.

    “Isolation requirements will be kept under constant review, and we do expect them to reduce. The reopening to visa free tourists is also likely to be brought forward, with July being the latest date we anticipate this happening.

    “All arrivals will be provided three rapid antigen tests at the airport, one for use on day 0/1, and one for use on day 5/6, with one extra for backup. This approach means we will continue to identify cases that enter through the border and limit their wider contact with the community.

    “In addition we will continue to whole genome sequence all returnees who test positive to rapidly identify and respond to new variants,” Chris Hipkins said.

    Steps 3 to 5
    “This plan represents a significant step forward in addressing skills and labour shortages and accelerates our economic recovery,” Immigration Minister Kris Faafoi said.

    “Reopening of the border to a range of visa holders is a critical part in our plan to rebuild from COVID.

    “From 13 March, just over 5 weeks away, we will start re-opening Working Holiday Visa schemes. This will supply urgently needed workers for the tourism, hospitality, wine and horticultural sectors as well as providing some much-needed visitor spending.

    “Also from 13 March, we’re simplifying the application process for the critical worker border exception. Skilled workers with job offers paying at least 1.5 times, instead of double, the median wage will be able to come in without the need to demonstrate that their skills aren’t readily obtainable in New Zealand.

    “Before COVID, New Zealand was issuing over one million visitor visas per year. What’s being announced today is about gearing up in manageable steps to fully re-open as safely as possible to enable us to live with COVID but not be overwhelmed by it,” Kris Faafoi said.

    Read more
    04.02.2022
  • New Zealand Latest News: Authorities delay re-opening plans for travel until end of February 2022 (Reuters, 20.12.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website
    for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    On 21 December 2021 the New Zealand Government announced a postponement to the gradual easing of border closures as part of measures to help contain the spread of Omicron for as long as possible. The phased easing of borders will be revisited by end of February 2022.
    *COVID-19 vaccination requirements: From 1 November 2021 all non-citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 28 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. From 7 January 2022, even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have a negative PCR or RT-PCRtest result in the 48 hours prior to departure and spend time in Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ), unless you are exempt under New Zealand rules.
    See the latest advice on pre departure tests that will be accepted by the New Zealand Government.
    *Quarantine free travel
    Border rules and quarantine-free travel ‘bubbles’, including eligibility criteria, can change quickly. Travellers must check the status of quarantine–free travel bubbles and be prepared for disruption to their plans if these travel bubbles are paused or suspended.
    For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. There are agreements in place with each state in Australia (see ‘travel between New Zealand and Australia’) and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand.
    When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met. Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including to the status of quarantine-free travel.
    *Between New Zealand and Australia: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and individual states in Australia may be fully or partially suspended at short notice.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 quarantine free travel requirements before you travel and during your stay in Australia. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline. To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline. You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website
    for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information.
    Most travellers to New Zealand will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. If you have received a COVID-19 vaccination, you will still need to take a test. Some people are exempt from pre-departure testing including travellers from certain locations.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit the government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubbles) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility. You will need to declare you have been vaccinated when you book your place in managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ). Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 24 December 2021 you must spend 10 days in MIQ with no self-isolation component.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand are legally required to have a voucher confirming their place in managed isolation (MIQ) before flying to New Zealand. Before you book your flights, you need to hold a confirmed voucher for managed isolation. There is a 4-step process to get a managed isolation allocation voucher using a virtual lobby process. For the step by step process see Secure your place in managed isolation.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. The emergency allocation requests exists for limited situations that require urgent travel to New Zealand within the next 14 days. To submit a request for an emergency allocation you must be legally entitled to enter New Zealand under the current border settings. See the Emergency Allocation Requests information on the Managed Isolation and Quarantine website.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to New Zealand for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave New Zealand after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver
    and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: COVID-19 restrictions in New Zealand are subject to change at short notice and can apply regionally or nationally. You can find detailed information on current COVID-19 levels and the restriction measures that are being enforced on the New Zealand Government website
    .
    At 11:59pm(NZT) on 2 December 2021 New Zealand moved into the new COVID-19 Protection Framework, a traffic light system of Green, Orange, and Red. More information is available on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website. At all levels, record keeping and scanning is mandatory, and evidence of vaccination is incentivised for business and public venues and events. Localised lockdowns may still be used as part of New Zealand’s public health response, so you should plan for disruption.
    *Coronavirus travel health: Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for New Zealand on the TravelHealthPro website. See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Check the current New Zealand COVID-19 restrictions and requirements.
    *Entry and borders: New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place, but will be easing in three steps from 16 January 2022. Public health measures remain in place under the COVID-19 Protection Framework (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, physical distancing, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in New Zealand.
    On 17 November 2021, the New Zealand Government launched its International Travel Vaccination Certificate, for people aged 12 years and over who have had a vaccine dose administered in New Zealand. If you have been vaccinated in New Zealand, you may request a digital vaccination certificate from the New Zealand Ministry of Health, which will be accepted at the UK border. If you previously received a vaccination confirmation letter from the New Zealand Ministry of Health this will be accepted during this transitional period. Please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for further information.
    *Other specific country and airline restrictions: Travel restrictions may be by imposed by other transit hubs. We advise you to check with your airline before travelling in case of any related disruption to airline schedules caused by the new restrictions.
    Some airlines have mandatory pre-departure PCR COVID-19 testing requirements, even for transit passengers. You should contact your individual airline for further information. The British High Commission in Wellington and Consulate General in Auckland are unable to offer certification or a negative test result. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the Healthpoint website for further information on accessing medical services.
    Face-coverings are required by legislation on all New Zealand domestic flights. Air New Zealand also requires travellers aged 12 years and 3 months or older on domestic flights between 14 December 2021 and 31 March 2022 to provide proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test. The InterIslander Cook Strait ferry service between the North and South Islands will also require proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test from 15 December 2021.
    Air New Zealand now requires all passengers to wear a face-covering on international flights. From 1 February 2022, Air New Zealand will require customers travelling anywhere on its international network to be fully vaccinated.
    Please see the Air New Zealand website and theInterIslander website for further information.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required. For domestic flights within New Zealand from 15 December 2021, you must either be fully vaccinated, or have a negative COVID-19 test result from a test administered no more than 72 hours before your flight.
    Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The Government also requires people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID-19 Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    *Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally: COVID-19 public health measures and restrictions may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.
    You can monitor levels, and whether New Zealand or the area you are visiting within New Zealand is at Green, Orange, or Red on the COVID-19 Protection Framework, by reviewing the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for the latest information where you are. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    You may require evidence of vaccination for entry into business and premises in New Zealand. If you are over 12 years old and have had one or more doses of vaccine in New Zealand you can apply for the domestic ‘My Vaccine Pass’. You may apply to have some COVID-19 vaccinations administered overseas entered into My Vaccine Pass, further information is available on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, the fully vaccinated can expect greater freedoms in New Zealand, but public health measures may still include:
    • Mandatory record keeping
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people at non-work gatherings, in shops, cafes, restaurants and other places of public gathering, and on visitors to private residences, both indoors and outdoors. (Numbers and settings may depend on the use of vaccination certificates.)
    • Physical distancing of 2 metres from people you do not know when out in public or in retail stores and 1 metre physical distancing in controlled environments like workplaces, where practicable
    • Restrictions on domestic transport, inter regional travel and use of public transport
    • Restrictions on schools, business, and recreational activities
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas

    Read more
    07.01.2022
  • New Zealand Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    On 24 November 2021 the New Zealand Government announced there will be gradual easing to the border closure in 2022 in three steps, with the following groups eligible to enter:
    • Fully vaccinated New Zealand citizens and those residence-class visa holders and other travellers eligible under New Zealand current settings from Australia from 11:59 pm (NZT) on Sunday 16 January 2022 (provided they have been in Australia or New Zealand for the past 14 days)
    • Fully vaccinated New Zealand citizens and those residence-class visa holders and other travellers eligible under New Zealand current border settings, from all but very high risk countries, from 11:59pm (NZT) on Sunday 13 February 2022
    See information about eligible travellers
    • Fully vaccinated foreign nationals from 30 April 2022 onwards. Please be aware the New Zealand Government may stage this opening by visa class categories.
    All travellers not required to go into MIQ will still require:
    • a negative pre-departure test
    • proof of being fully vaccinated
    • a passenger declaration about travel history
    • a day 0/1 test on arrival
    • seven days isolation, and a final negative test before entering the community
    *COVID-19 vaccination requirements: From 1 November 2021 all non-citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 3 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have a negative COVID-19 test result in the 72 hours prior to departure and spend time in Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ), unless you are exempt under New Zealand rules.
    See the latest advice on pre departure tests that will be accepted by the New Zealand Government.

    *Travellers from high risk countries: Travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. See New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    To see the current list of countries designated as very high risk please go to the [New Zealand Government website]. The list of countries designated as very high risk is reviewed regularly by the New Zealand Government. Please see the New Zealand Government website for the latest list.
    *Quarantine free travel: Border rules and quarantine-free travel ‘bubbles’, including eligibility criteria, can change quickly. Travellers must check the status of quarantine–free travel bubbles and be prepared for disruption to their plans if these travel bubbles are paused or suspended.
    For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. There are agreements in place with each state in Australia (see ‘travel between New Zealand and Australia’) and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand.
    When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met. Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including to the status of quarantine-free travel.
    *Between New Zealand and Australia: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and individual states in Australia may be fully or partially suspended at short notice. You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 quarantine free travel requirements before you travel and during your stay in Australia. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline. To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time. You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information. Most travellers to New Zealand will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. If you have received a COVID-19 vaccination, you will still need to take a test. Some people are exempt from pre-departure testing including travellers from certain locations.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website. You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit the government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubbles) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility. You will need to declare you have been vaccinated when you book your place in managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ). Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 14 November 2021 you must spend 7 days in MIQ followed by home isolation until you return a negative day 9 test. Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand are legally required to have a voucher confirming their place in managed isolation (MIQ) before flying to New Zealand. Before you book your flights, you need to hold a confirmed voucher for managed isolation. There is a 4-step process to get a managed isolation allocation voucher using a virtual lobby process. For the step by step process see Secure your place in managed isolation.

    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. The emergency allocation requests exists for limited situations that require urgent travel to New Zealand within the next 14 days. To submit a request for an emergency allocation you must be legally entitled to enter New Zealand under the current border settings. See the Emergency Allocation Requests information on the Managed Isolation and Quarantine website.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to New Zealand for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave New Zealand after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    If you intend to travel to New Zealand from 30 April 2022 and are fully vaccinated please check the COVID-19 Government website for relevant testing, entry requirements and self-isolation requirements.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver
    and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: COVID-19 restrictions in New Zealand are subject to change at short notice and can apply regionally or nationally. You can find detailed information on current COVID-19 levels and the restriction measures that are being enforced on the New Zealand Government website
    .
    At 11:59pm(NZT) on 2 December 2021 New Zealand moved into the new COVID-19 Protection Framework, a traffic light system of Green, Orange, and Red. More information is available on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website. At all levels, record keeping and scanning is mandatory, and evidence of vaccination is incentivised for business and public venues and events. Localised lockdowns may still be used as part of New Zealand’s public health response, so you should plan for disruption.
    *Coronavirus travel health: Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for New Zealand on the TravelHealthPro website. See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Check the current New Zealand COVID-19 restrictions and requirements.
    *Entry and borders: New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place, but will be easing in three steps from 16 January 2022. Public health measures remain in place under the COVID-19 Protection Framework (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, physical distancing, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in New Zealand.
    On 17 November 2021, the New Zealand Government launched its International Travel Vaccination Certificate, for people aged 12 years and over who have had a vaccine dose administered in New Zealand. If you have been vaccinated in New Zealand, you may request a digital vaccination certificate from the New Zealand Ministry of Health, which will be accepted at the UK border. If you previously received a vaccination confirmation letter from the New Zealand Ministry of Health this will be accepted during this transitional period. Please see the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for further information.
    *Other specific country and airline restrictions: Travel restrictions may be by imposed by other transit hubs. We advise you to check with your airline before travelling in case of any related disruption to airline schedules caused by the new restrictions.
    Some airlines have mandatory pre-departure PCR COVID-19 testing requirements, even for transit passengers. You should contact your individual airline for further information. The British High Commission in Wellington and Consulate General in Auckland are unable to offer certification or a negative test result. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the Healthpoint website for further information on accessing medical services.
    Face-coverings are required by legislation on all New Zealand domestic flights. Air New Zealand also requires travellers aged 12 years and 3 months or older on domestic flights between 14 December 2021 and 31 March 2022 to provide proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test. The InterIslander Cook Strait ferry service between the North and South Islands will also require proof of full vaccination or a negative pre-departure test from 15 December 2021.
    Air New Zealand now requires all passengers to wear a face-covering on international flights. From 1 February 2022, Air New Zealand will require customers travelling anywhere on its international network to be fully vaccinated.
    Please see the Air New Zealand website and theInterIslander website for further information.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required. For domestic flights within New Zealand from 15 December 2021, you must either be fully vaccinated, or have a negative COVID-19 test result from a test administered no more than 72 hours before your flight.
    Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The Government also requires people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID-19 Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    *Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally: COVID-19 public health measures and restrictions may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.
    You can monitor levels, and whether New Zealand or the area you are visiting within New Zealand is at Green, Orange, or Red on the COVID-19 Protection Framework, by reviewing the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website for the latest information where you are. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    You may require evidence of vaccination for entry into business and premises in New Zealand. If you are over 12 years old and have had one or more doses of vaccine in New Zealand you can apply for the domestic ‘My Vaccine Pass’. You may apply to have some COVID-19 vaccinations administered overseas entered into My Vaccine Pass, further information is available on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, the fully vaccinated can expect greater freedoms in New Zealand, but public health measures may still include:
    • Mandatory record keeping
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people at non-work gatherings, in shops, cafes, restaurants and other places of public gathering, and on visitors to private residences, both indoors and outdoors. (Numbers and settings may depend on the use of vaccination certificates.)
    • Physical distancing of 2 metres from people you do not know when out in public or in retail stores and 1 metre physical distancing in controlled environments like workplaces, where practicable
    • Restrictions on domestic transport, inter regional travel and use of public transport
    • Restrictions on schools, business, and recreational activities
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas

    Read more
    13.12.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Lockdown restrictions in Auckland, neighboring regions extended by at least a week (VoA, 12.10.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the Immigration New Zealand website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    *COVID-19 vaccination requirements: From 1 November 2021 all non-citizens aged 17-years and over arriving into New Zealand, including New Zealand permanent residents and temporary visa holders, must be fully vaccinated. This means travellers need to have had a full course of any of the 22 COVID-19 vaccines that have been approved by a foreign government or approval authority, and which are accepted by New Zealand. You need to have had the last dose at least 14 days before you arrive in New Zealand. Even if you are fully vaccinated, you still need to have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure and spend time in Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ), unless you are exempt under New Zealand rules.
    *Travellers from high risk countries: Travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. See New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk:
    • Brazil
    • Fiji
    • India
    • Indonesia
    • Pakistan
    • Papua New Guinea
    *Quarantine free travel: Border rules and quarantine-free travel ‘bubbles’, including eligibility criteria, can change quickly. Travellers must check the status of quarantine –free travel bubbles and be prepared for disruption to their plans if these travel bubbles are paused or suspended.
    For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. There are agreements in place with each State in Australia (see ‘travel between New Zealand and Australia’) and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand.
    When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met.
    Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including to the status of quarantine-free travel.
    *Between New Zealand and Australia: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and individual States in Australia may be fully or partially suspended at short notice.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 quarantine free travel requirements before you travel and during your stay in Australia. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and the Cook Islands may be fully or partially paused at any time.
    You should check the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information.
    All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website.
    Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit the government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubbles) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility. You will need to declare you have been vaccinated when you book your place in managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ). Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 14 November 2021 the period of time you must spend 7 days in MIQ followed by home isolation until you return a negative day 9 test.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand are legally required to have a voucher confirming their place in managed isolation (MIQ) before flying to New Zealand. Before you book your flights, you need to hold a confirmed voucher for managed isolation. There is a 4-step process to get a managed isolation allocation voucher using a virtual lobby process. For the step by step process see Secure your place in managed isolation.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. The emergency allocation requests exists for limited situations that require urgent travel to New Zealand within the next 14 days. To submit a request for an emergency allocation you must be legally entitled to enter New Zealand under the current border settings. See the Emergency Allocation Requests information on the Managed Isolation and Quarantine website
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).
    *Onward travel to the Cook Islands: See FCDO travel advice for the Cook Islands, Tokelau and Niue

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places.The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally
    The Alert Levels may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.
    You should monitor alert levels by reviewing the New Zealand government COVID website for the latest information where you are and comply with these measures and other advice from local authorities. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Measures may include:
    • Mandatory record keeping
    • Restrictions on the numbers of people at non-work gatherings, in shops, cafes, restaurants and other places of public gathering, and on visitors to private residences, both indoors and outdoors
    • Physical distancing of 2 metres from people you do not know when out in public or in retail stores and 1 metre physical distancing in controlled environments like workplaces, where practicable
    • Restrictions on domestic transport, inter regional travel and use of public transport
    • Restrictions on schools, business, recreation activities operating restrictions
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    30.10.2021
  • New Zealand Auckland will remain in Alert Level 3 but several key changes will occur. People will be able to connect with loved ones OUTDOORS with no more than two households at a time, up to a maximum of 10 people; early childhood education will return for all; and people can move around Auckland for recreation such as beach visits and hunting.

    “At step two retail will open their doors, with the usual measures of wearing facemasks and keeping up physical distancing; public facilities such as pools and zoos will open; and the number of people who can meet OUTDOORS will increase to 25.

    “Step three will bring back those higher risk settings. Hospitality will open – seated, separated and with a limit of 50; close contact businesses like hairdressers will also open with mask use and physical distancing; and gatherings will also then extend to 50.

    “Cabinet will review each step weekly to ensure it’s safe to move before confirming the next step. The wage subsidy will continue to be available.

    “Public health advice also sets out that schools at this stage will be able to return after school holidays on the 18th of October with the final decision to be made on that closer to the time.

    “In total, this phasing amounts to a careful and methodical transition plan for Auckland. At the end of these steps, we will then move to a national framework that reflects a more highly vaccinated population, allowing us the ability to deal with riskier settings such as large-scale events with the use of vaccine certificates.

    “Cabinet also agreed the rest of New Zealand will remain at Alert Level 2 to continue to support Auckland to do the heavy lifting – but the 100 limit cap on hospitality venues is removed. The requirement for customers to be seated and separated with physical distancing remains in place.

    “Today we hit the milestone of 2 million New Zealanders vaccinated. It follows the doubling of Auckland vaccination rates over the past 7 weeks, with 84 percent of Aucklanders having had one dose, and 52 per cent now fully vaccinated. But there is more work to do.

    “Vaccines were always going to change the way we manage Covid-19 into the future, but our strategy has worked and will remain – we want to control the virus, avoid cases and hospitalisations, enjoy our freedoms, and reconnect with the world,” Jacinda Ardern said.

    Read more
    05.10.2021
  • New Zealand Air New Zealand

    30.08.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand authorities will lift quarantine-free travel pause with Western Australia and Northern Territory (xinhua, 05.07.2021). New Zealand government extends pause on quarantine-free travel with New South Wales for 12 days beginning 25 June because of COVID-19 (Xinhua, 25.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    From 11:59pm on 28 April 2021, travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. See
    New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk: Brazil, India, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea

    *Quarantine free travel: For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. There are agreements in place with each State in Australia (see ‘travel between New Zealand and Australia’) and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand.
    When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met.
    Border rules including eligibility criteria can change quickly. Travellers must prepare for disruption to their plans.
    Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including changes to quarantine-free travel.
    *Between New Zealand and Australia: From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility unless advised otherwise.
    The quarantine free travel agreements between New Zealand and individual States in Australia may be fully or partially suspended at short notice.
    You should check th e New Zealand government COVID-19 quarantine free travel requirements before you travel and during your stay in Australia. If your travel plans are disrupted, you should contact your airline.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, pleasesee INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: From 17 May 2021 you can travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands without having to go into managed isolation or self-isolation when you arrive at your destination. You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information .
    All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit thegovernment COVID-19 website
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubble, currently arranged with Australia and the Cook Islands) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. Please see the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see ‘Secure your place in managed isolation’
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher in advance. Space in managed isolation is limited and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System
    website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit theNew Zealand Ministry of Health websitefor more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places.The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    *Range of measures that can be applied locally or nationally: The Alert Levels may be applied at a town, city, territorial local authority, regional or national level.
    You should monitor alert levels by reviewing theNew Zealand government COVID website for the latest information where you are and comply with these measures and other advice from local authorities. You can also check restrictions and health updates on the New Zealand Ministry of Health website.
    Measures may include:
    • Restrictions on numbers of people at non-work gatherings, in shops, cafes, restaurants and other places of public gathering, and on visitors to private residences
    • Physical distancing of 2 metres from people you do not know when out in public or in retail stores and 1 metre physical distancing in controlled environments like workplaces, where practicable
    • Restrictions on domestic transport, inter regional travel and use of public transport
    • Restrictions on schools, business, recreation activities operating restrictions
    • Face masks on public transport and in high risk, crowded areas

    Read more
    01.07.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand government extends pause on quarantine-free travel with New South Wales for 12 days beginning 25 June because of COVID-19 (Xinhua, 25.06.2021). New Zealand authorities suspend quarantine-free travel bubble with New South Wales for 48 hours (TVNZ, 06.05.2021). New Zealand’s authorities halt flights from Western Australia after worker at quarantine hotel in Perth tested positive for COVID-19 (NZHerald, 01.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    From 11:59pm on 28 April 2021, travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. See New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk:
    • Brazil, India, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea.
    *Quarantine free travel: For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. It is currently with Australia, apart from the State of New South Wales (see ‘travel between New Zealand and Australia’) and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand.
    When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met.
    Border rules including eligibility criteria can change quickly. Travellers must prepare for disruption to their plans.
    Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including changes to quarantine-free travel.
    Between New Zealand and Australia: From 23 June 2021, quarantine free travel between New Zealand and the State of New South Wales in Australia is paused.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility unless advised otherwise. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: From 17 May 2021 you can travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands without having to go into managed isolation or self-isolation when you arrive at your destination. You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information.
    All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit the government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubble, currently arranged with Australia, apart from the State of New South Wales, and the Cook Islands) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. Please see the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see ‘Secure your place in managed isolation’.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher in advance. Space in managed isolation is limited and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check theManaged Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits .
    If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government

    Read more
    24.06.2021
  • New Zealand 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. – This does not apply to: – nationals of New Zealand; – permanent residents of New Zealand; – partner or dependent child of a national or a
    permanent resident of New Zealand. Their visa must be based on the relationship; – nationals or permanent residents of Australia residing in New Zealand; – passengers who have a
    visa and have been granted an exemption before departure; details can be found at https://www.immigration.govt.nz/formshelp/request-for-travel-to-new-zealand ; – passengers
    arriving from Australia, Cook Isl. or Niue if they in the past 14 days have only been in Australia, Cook Isl., New Zealand or Niue.

    2. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in or transited through Brazil, India, Pakistan or Papua New Guinea are not allowed to enter. – This does not apply to: – nationals
    of New Zealand; – partner or dependent child of a national of New Zealand; – parent of a dependent child who is a national of New Zealand.

    3. Passengers are not allowed to transit. – This does not apply to: – nationals of New Zealand; – nationals of Australia if they have not been in Brazil, India, Pakistan and Papua
    New Guinea in the past 14 days; – residents of New Zealand if they have not been in Brazil, India, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea in the past 14 days; – passengers with a New
    Zealand Electronic Travel Authority (NZeTA) if they have not been in Brazil, India, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea in the past 14 days; – passengers with a visa issued by New
    Zealand if they have not been in Brazil, India, Pakistan and Papua New Guinea in the past 14 days.

    4. Passengers are not allowed to transit through New Zealand to Australia, Cook Isl. or Niue if they are arriving from Australia, Cook Isl. or Niue.

    5. Passengers are not allowed to transit through New Zealand to China (People’s Rep.). – This does not apply to nationals of China (People�s Rep.) arriving from Cook Isl., Fiji,
    Niue, Samoa, Tonga or Vanuatu.

    6. Transit is only allowed at Auckland (AKL) for maximum 24 hours.

    7. Passengers transiting through New Zealand to Australia must have a confirmed onward ticket on a red zone flight within 14 days.

    8. Passengers must have a negative COVID-19 test result. Tests accepted are: antigen, LAMP, PCR and RT-PCR tests. The test must have been taken at most 72 hours before departure
    from the first embarkation point. More details can be found at https://tinyurl.com/39tsn56h – This does not apply to: – passengers arriving from Antarctica, Australia, Cook Isl.,
    Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Isl., Micronesia (Federated States), Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Isl., Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu or Vanuatu; – passengers younger than 2
    years; – passengers with a medical certificate specifying that the passenger cannot take a test due to medical reasons and does not have COVID-19 symptoms. The certificate must be
    issued at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point; – passengers with a diplomatic or consular visa; – passengers who are members of the New Zealand Defence
    Force; – passengers arriving from Albania, Belize, Dominica, Kenya, Lao People’s Dem. Rep., Montenegro, Myanmar, Slovenia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines,
    Tajikistan or Turkmenistan. They must have a medical certificate issued at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point and it must confirm that they have no
    COVID-19 symptoms.

    9. Passengers must have a voucher confirming their allocation to a place in managed isolation. – This does not apply to: – passengers arriving from Australia if they in the past
    14 days have only been in Australia or New Zealand. Details can be found at https://covid19.govt.nz/travel/quarantine-free-travel/australia/ ; – passengers arriving from Cook Isl.
    if they in the past 14 days have only been in Cook Isl. or New Zealand; – passengers arriving from Niue if they in the past 14 days have only been in New Zealand or Niue.

    10. Passengers arriving from Australia, Cook Isl. or Niue must complete a health declaration before check-in. The declaration can be obtained at https://naumaira.covid19.govt.nz/
    or https://border.covid19.govt.nz

    11. Passengers could be subject to medical screening and quarantine for 14 days.

    12. Airline crew not residing in Australia or New Zealand must have: – a negative COVID-19 test result. Tests accepted are: antigen, LAMP, PCR and RT-PCR tests. The test must have
    been taken at most 7 days before arrival; or – a medical certificate issued at most 7 days before arrival. The certificate must confirm that they have no COVID-19 symptoms and they
    cannot take a COVID-19 test due to particular needs; or – a medical certificate specifying that they do not have COVID-19 symptoms and are not contagious, if they were tested
    positive at most 7 days before arrival.

    Read more
    16.06.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand authorities suspend quarantine-free travel bubble with New South Wales for 48 hours (TVNZ, 06.05.2021). Cook Islands, New Zealand: Two-way quarantine-free travel expected to commence between countries on 17 May (Xinhua, 03.05.2021). New Zealand’s authorities halt flights from Western Australia after worker at quarantine hotel in Perth tested positive for COVID-19 (NZHerald, 01.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. From 11:59pm on 28 April 2021, travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. SeeNew Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk:
    • Brazil;
    • India;
    • Pakistan;
    • Papua New Guinea;
    *Quarantine free travel: For New Zealand, quarantine-free travel is available on commercial aircraft only. It is currently with Australia and the Cook Islands only. Quarantine-free travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands does not include those travelling from Australia to New Zealand. When entering New Zealand from a quarantine free travel zone, normal visa conditions remain. If you are a temporary visa holder in New Zealand, you should be aware that you need to meet New Zealand immigration requirements in order to return to New Zealand. This means you need to have a ‘multiple entry’ visa that gives permission to leave New Zealand and return, provided all entry requirements are met. Border rules including eligibility criteria can change quickly. Travellers must prepare for disruption to their plans. Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including changes to quarantine-free travel.
    *Between New Zealand and Australia: From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    *Between New Zealand and the Cook Islands: From 17 May 2021 you can travel between New Zealand and the Cook Islands without having to go into managed isolation or self-isolation when you arrive at your destination. You need to spend 14 full days before your date of departure in either New Zealand or the Cook Islands. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. You must hold a visa or NZeTA to travel from the Cook Islands to New Zealand, please see INZ for criteria information. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website. Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. For more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand visit thegovernment COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from within a quarantine-free travel bubble, currently arranged with Australia and the Cook Islands) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. Please see the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details. Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except travel from within a quarantine-free travel bubble) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see ‘Secure your place in managed isolation’. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher in advance. Space in managed isolation is limited and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. SeeInformation about NZeTA for further detail. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits . If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    14.05.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand’s authorities halt flights from Western Australia after worker at quarantine hotel in Perth tested positive for COVID-19 (NZHerald, 01.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    From 11:59pm on 28 April 2021, travellers to New Zealand from very high risk countries are temporarily restricted to New Zealand citizens, their partners, dependent children, the parent of a dependent child who is a New Zealand citizen, and those with significant humanitarian reasons. All non-New Zealand citizens must hold a valid visa to enter New Zealand. Other travellers, including New Zealand residents, can enter only if they spend 14 days outside a very high risk country before their arrival here. Transit through a very high risk country is excluded from the 14-day requirement. See New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    The following countries currently meet the threshold of being very high risk: Brazil, India, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.
    Border rules including eligibility criteria can change quickly. Travellers must prepare for disruption to their plans.
    Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including changes to quarantine-free travel.
    All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure.

    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    Reasons you can travel to New Zealand: You may be able to travel to New Zealand while the border is closed if you are considered to have a critical purpose to travel. Please see the INZ website for criteria. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from a safe zone in Australia) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. Please see the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except from a safe zone in Australia) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website
    for more information.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    30.04.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Authorities in New Zealand suspend entry to travelers from India (Reuters, 07.04.2021). PM of New Zealand announces quarantine-free travel between NZ and Australia from 19 April (Reuters, 05.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. From 4pm NZST on Sunday 11 April 2021, travellers who have been in India in the previous 14 days cannot enter New Zealand, including New Zealand citizens and residents. The temporary suspension will be in place until Wednesday 28 April 2021. See New Zealand Immigration’s (INZ) website for further details.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. See the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    To enter New Zealand from a safe zone in Australia travellers must hold a visa or NZeTA, normal immigration rules apply, please see INZ for criteria information.

    Border rules including eligibility criteria can change quickly. Travellers must prepare for disruption to their plans.
    Check the COVID-19 government website for the latest information, including changes to quarantine-free travel.
    All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This came into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand
    • essential health workers
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand
    • critical humanitarian travel
    • maritime crew
    On 12 June 2020, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand (except from a safe zone in Australia) needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 19 April 2021 travellers who have been in Australia for 14 days can travel by air to New Zealand without having to enter a managed isolation facility. Please see the New Zealand government COVID-19 website for details.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand (except from a safe zone in Australia) will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website
    for more information.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    On 11 August 2020, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June 2020, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    09.04.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ reinstated after Auckland’s hot-spot status removed (NZ Herald,10.03.2021). Auckland ends week-long COVID-19 lockdown (Reuters, 06.03.2021). Flights to Cook Islands to resume after Auckland’s COVID-19 lockdown ends (Stuff New Zealand, 06.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    12.03.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Flights to Cook Islands to resume after Auckland’s COVID-19 lockdown ends (Stuff New Zealand, 06.03.2021). COVID-19 lockdown reintroduced in Auckland for seven days from 28 February after new case reported (Reuters, 27.02.2021). Travelers from New Zealand face tighter restrictions in New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria because of COVID-19 (Sydney Morning Herald , 24.02.2021). Authorities further ease COVID-19 restrictions in Auckland from midnight on 22 February (News Hub, 21.02.2021). Snap COVID-19 lockdown disrupts flight, ferry and train services in Auckland (Stuff NZ, 14.02.2021). Quarantine rules tightened in New Zealand because of COVID-19 variant (Reuters, 27.01.2021). Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: AAs of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.
    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    06.03.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown reintroduced in Auckland for seven days from 28 February after new case reported (Reuters, 27.02.2021). Travelers from New Zealand face tighter restrictions in New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria because of COVID-19 (Sydney Morning Herald , 24.02.2021). Authorities further ease COVID-19 restrictions in Auckland from midnight on 22 February (News Hub, 21.02.2021). Snap COVID-19 lockdown disrupts flight, ferry and train services in Auckland (Stuff NZ, 14.02.2021). Quarantine rules tightened in New Zealand because of COVID-19 variant (Reuters, 27.01.2021). Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: AAs of 6am local time on Sunday 28 February, the Auckland region has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions, the rest of New Zealand has been put under Covid-19 Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 6am on Sunday 7 March. This follows a community outbreak of Covid-19 in South Auckland. Delays s and cancellations to transport may occur, and you should check with your travel provider. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.

    *Travel in New Zealand: Travel in to and out of the Auckland region will be restricted to those who are returning to their normal place of residence. A border, with checkpoints, has been placed around the city. Direct travel to the airport will be permitted for those who need to catch an international flight. Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1,2 and 3. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    28.02.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Authorities further ease COVID-19 restrictions in Auckland from midnight on 22 February (News Hub, 21.02.2021). Snap COVID-19 lockdown disrupts flight, ferry and train services in Auckland (Stuff NZ, 14.02.2021). Government imposes three-day lockdown on Auckland after three new local COVID-19 cases reported (Reuters, 14.02.2021). Quarantine rules tightened in New Zealand because of COVID-19 variant (Reuters, 27.01.2021). Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 11.59pm local time on Sunday 14 February, the Auckland region has been put under COVID Alert Level 3 restrictions; the rest of New Zealand has been put under COVID Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 11.59pm Wednesday 17 February but will be reviewed every 24 hours. This follows a community outbreak of COVID-19 in South Auckland. Travel to the Auckland region will be restricted to those who are returning residents. A border around the city will be in place.. Direct travel to the airport will be permitted for those who need to catch international flights. Face masks are required on all public transport throughout New Zealand. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.

    *Travel in New Zealand: Wearing a face mask on all public transport and domestic flights in New Zealand is legally required at COVID Levels 1 and 2. Physical distancing is recommended in public places. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Read more
    23.02.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government will lift COVID-19 lockdown in Auckland and ease restrictions across rest of country from midnight on 17 February (Reuters, 17.02.2021). Snap COVID-19 lockdown disrupts flight, ferry and train services in Auckland (Stuff NZ, 14.02.2021). Government imposes three-day lockdown on Auckland after three new local COVID-19 cases reported (Reuters, 14.02.2021). Quarantine rules tightened in New Zealand because of COVID-19 variant (Reuters, 27.01.2021). Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 11.59pm local time on Sunday 14 February, the Auckland region has been put under COVID Alert Level 3 restrictions; the rest of New Zealand has been put under COVID Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 11.59pm Wednesday 17 February but will be reviewed every 24 hours. This follows a community outbreak of COVID-19 in South Auckland. Travel to the Auckland region will be restricted to those who are returning residents. A border around the city will be in place.. Direct travel to the airport will be permitted for those who need to catch international flights. Face masks are required on all public transport throughout New Zealand. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.

    *Travel in New Zealand: Travel to and through the Auckland region is currently restricted. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand government.
    Wearing a face mask on public transport and physical distancing in all locations is required at COVID Levels 2 and 3. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    19.02.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government imposes three-day lockdown on Auckland after three new local COVID-19 cases reported (Reuters, 14.02.2021). Quarantine rules tightened in New Zealand because of COVID-19 variant (Reuters, 27.01.2021). Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Australia government suspends its one-way travel bubble with New Zealand for 72 hours because of COVID-19 (Stuff NZ, 25.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus: As of 11.59pm local time on Sunday 14 February, the Auckland region has been put under COVID Alert Level 3 restrictions; the rest of New Zealand has been put under COVID Alert Level 2 restrictions. These restrictions will be in place until 11.59pm Wednesday 17 February but will be reviewed every 24 hours. This follows a community outbreak of COVID-19 in South Auckland. Travel to the Auckland region will be restricted to those who are returning residents. A border around the city will be in place.. Direct travel to the airport will be permitted for those who need to catch international flights. Face masks are required on all public transport throughout New Zealand. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced on the New Zealand Government website.

    *Travel in New Zealand: Travel to and through the Auckland region is currently restricted. You can find detailed information on current alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand government. Wearing a face mask on public transport and physical distancing in all locations is required at COVID Levels 2 and 3. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch.
    New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    14.02.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Borders expected to remain closed through most of 2021 because of COVID-19 concerns (Japan Times, 26.01.2021). Australia government suspends its one-way travel bubble with New Zealand for 72 hours because of COVID-19 (Stuff NZ, 25.01.2021). Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021). Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ will be allowed in first quarter of 2021 (NYPost, 14.12.2020). Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced fromthe New Zealand government. From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you’re strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Auckland, encourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government. Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    27.01.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021). Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ will be allowed in first quarter of 2021 (NYPost, 14.12.2020). Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers to New Zealand (except those coming from Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Islands) will be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11:59pm (local time) on 25 January. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. Anyone travelling to New Zealand will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine. Travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits. If you are staying airside while transiting through New Zealand you do not need to provide a negative COVID-19 pre-departure test (but you may need to be tested as per the requirements of your destination country).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced fromthe New Zealand government .From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you’re strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Auckland, encourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government .
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    22.01.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government to ask most international travelers for negative COVID-19 tests (Reuters, 11.01.2021). New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021). Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ will be allowed in first quarter of 2021 (NYPost, 14.12.2020). Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. All travellers from the UK and USA will be also be required to have confirmation of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on theINZ website . The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    From 11:59 pm 31 December, anyone travelling to New Zealand from the UK or USA will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals from the UK or USA must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    From 15 January, all travellers from the UK and USA will be also be required to have confirmation of a negative Covid-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11.59pm (local time) on 15 January.
    For more information please visit the New Zealand government COVID-19 website.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits .

    Internal Restrictions:
    Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced fromthe New Zealand government . From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you’re strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Auckland, encourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from theNew Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    13.01.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: New Zealand to require negative COVID-19 test for all travelers entering from U.K. and U.S., starting 15 January (Stuff New Zealand, 02.01.2021). Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ will be allowed in first quarter of 2021 (NYPost, 14.12.2020). Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    .• partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents;
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand;
    • essential health workers;
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government;
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel;
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand;
    • critical humanitarian travel;
    • maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process. From 11:59 pm 31 December, anyone travelling to New Zealand from the UK or USA will be required to have a COVID-19 test on ‘day zero’, i.e. within 24 hours of arrival in a managed isolation and quarantine facility. Arrivals from the UK or USA must remain in their managed isolation or quarantine facility room until the results of the test is known. You will then undergo further testing on Day 3 and Day 12 as required for all arrivals, in line with New Zealand’s policy on isolation and quarantine.
    From 15 January, all travellers from the UK and USA will be also be required to have confirmation of a negative Covid-19 PCR test result in the 72 hours prior to departure. This will come into force on flights arriving in New Zealand after 11.59pm (local time) on 15 January.
    For more information please visit theNew Zealand government COVID-19 website .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    *Leaving New Zealand: The entry restrictions imposed by Hong Kong, Singapore and other transit hubs apply to travellers who have been in the UK for at least 14 days before their flight. These restrictions do not affect British Nationals leaving New Zealand. We advise you to check with your airline before travelling in case of any related disruption to airline schedules caused by the new restrictions.
    *Visas: If you’re unable to leave New Zealand and your visa is nearing expiry, you should contact the New Zealand authorities as soon as possible. See New Zealand government and New Zealand Immigration websites for the latest information. If you hold an open work, student, visitor, limited or interim visa with an expiry date after 9 July 2020, your visa was not extended by the Epidemic Management Notice or the changes announced on 7 July and 20 December 2020. Your current visa expiry remains the same. You must apply online for a new visa. See Covid-19 Key Updates for latest information. However, if you hold a Working Holiday visa or an Employer-assisted work-visa the Government of New Zealand announced on 20 December these will be extended for 6 months.. Working Holiday visas will be extended for 6 months from their date of expiry between 21/12/2020 – 30/06/2021. Restrictions will be relaxed on the maximum duration of work permitted, allowing Working Holiday visa holders to continue working in any industry they choose (including horticulture and wine sector roles). See Covid-19 Key Updates for latest information. Employer-assisted work-visa holders who have a job will have their visas, and those of their partners and dependent children, extended for 6 months from their date of expiry between 01/01/2021 – 30/06/2021. See Covid-19 Key Updates for latest information.
    *Pre-departure testing: Some airlines, including Etihad, have mandatory pre-departure PCR COVID-19 testing requirements, even for transit passengers. You should contact your individual airline for further information. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the Healthpoint website for further information on accessing medical services.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government. From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Aucklandencourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    02.01.2021
  • New Zealand Latest News: Quarantine-free travel between Australia and NZ will be allowed in first quarter of 2021 (NYPost, 14.12.2020). Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents
    • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand
    • essential health workers
    • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand government
    • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel
    • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand
    • critical humanitarian travel
    • maritime crew
    On 12 June, the government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.
    The website also includesinformation on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand needs to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you’re currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12:01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not need a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. SeeInformation about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    *Leaving New Zealand: The entry restrictions imposed by Hong Kong, Singapore and other transit hubs apply to travellers who have been in the UK for at least 14 days before their flight. These restrictions do not affect British Nationals leaving New Zealand. We advise you to check with your airline before travelling in case of any related disruption to airline schedules caused by the new restrictions.
    *Pre-departure testing: Pre-departure COVID-19 testing is mandatory for flights with Emirates and Etihad Airways. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the here website for further information on accessing medical services. Emirates have confirmed they will accept SMS/TXT notification of a negative test result, which passengers can present at the airport. The Travel Advice will be updated as further information comes available.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government. From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Aucklandencourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    22.12.2020
  • New Zealand Latest News: Flights from New Zealand to Melbourne resume (9News Australia, 16.11.2020). Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: • partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents • Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand • essential health workers • other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government • Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel • New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand • critical humanitarian travel • maritime crew .On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility. For more information see Secure your place in managed isolation. Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions. You can apply for your MIQ voucher up to 3 months in advance. Space in managed isolation is extremely limited over the Christmas and New Year period and the New Zealand government is asking prospective travellers to regularly check the Managed Isolation Allocation System website for preferred dates. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information. On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents. You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you are currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12.01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand: From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.
    *Pre-departure testing: Pre-departure COVID-19 testing is mandatory for flights with Emirates and Etihad Airways. Those requiring testing should contact their GP or visit the Healthpoint website for further information on accessing medical services. Emirates have confirmed they will accept SMS/TXT notification of a negative test result, which passengers can present at the airport. The Travel Advice will be updated as further information comes available.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: The whole of New Zealand is at Alert Level 1. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government. From 11:59pm on Wednesday 18 November, you legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling to, from or through Auckland on public transport. This includes on long-distance bus and train journeys. You also legally must wear a face covering when you’re travelling on a domestic flight anywhere in New Zealand. This does not include private flights. Drivers of taxis and ride-shares in Auckland legally must wear a face covering from Thursday. If you’re a passenger in a taxi or ride-share, you are strongly encouraged to wear a face covering. While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice for everyone outside of Aucklandencourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing. The NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose with all shops and businesses displaying their QR codes for scanning. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    20.11.2020
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020). Countrywide COVID-19 Alert Level drops at midnight on 21 September except for Auckland (NZ Media, 20.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents; Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand; essential health workers; other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government; Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel; New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand; critical humanitarian travel; maritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.
    The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you are currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12.01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand:
    From 20 June, here and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in New Zealand: After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures.
    Since 7 October, Auckland has been at Alert Level 1, bringing it into line with the rest of the country. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government.
    While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, government advice encourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing, if required. A NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government. Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    08.10.2020
  • New Zealand Latest News: Government to ease Auckland’s COVID-19 restrictions at midnight on 7 October (Reuters, 04.10.2020). Countrywide COVID-19 Alert Level drops at midnight on 21 September except for Auckland (NZ Media, 20.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to New Zealand: The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents; Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand; essential health workers; other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government; Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel; New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand; critical humanitarian travel; maritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.
    The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    .
    *Quarantine requirements: Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community.
    From 5 October, travellers to New Zealand will need to register on the Managed Isolation Allocation System as the first step to securing their place in a managed isolation facility. Before you book your flights, you need to register for a voucher for managed isolation. Your voucher allocates you a place in a managed isolation facility.
    Provision of a voucher for managed isolation does not guarantee entry into New Zealand. You must first ensure you qualify to enter the country under New Zealand’s border restrictions.
    There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information.
    On 11 August, the New Zealand government introduced legislation relating to charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders and permanent residents.
    You will be liable for a managed isolation charge if you are currently overseas and return to NZ for a period of less than 90 days; or you leave NZ after the regulations came into effect (12.01am on 11 August 2020) and return at a later date.
    *Transit via New Zealand:
    From 20 June, here and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them.
    In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail.
    If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email.
    The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits.

    Internal Restrictions:
    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures.

    Auckland is currently at Level 2 of its Covid-19 Alert Level System. At 11:59pm New Zealand time on 7 October, it will move to Alert Level 1, bringing it into line with the rest of the country. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand government.
    While not mandatory at Alert Level 1, Government advice encourages the use of face coverings on public transport and where it is not possible to maintain physical distance from people who you do not know, for example in supermarkets. The Government also encourages people to keep track of their movements and who they have seen to help with contact tracing, if required. A NZ COVID Tracer app is available to download for this purpose. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland or Christchurch.
    New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    05.10.2020
  • New Zealand Latest News: Countrywide COVID-19 Alert Level drops at midnight on 21 September except for Auckland (NZ Media, 20.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver see here. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. More info on NZeTA here. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available here.
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    Internal Restrictions:
    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures.

    New Zealand is currently at Level 2 of its Covid-19 Alert Level System. At 11:59pm New Zealand time on Monday 21 September, the rest of New Zealand will move to Alert Level 1. Auckland will remain at Alert Level 2, but from 11:59pm New Zealand time on Wednesday 23 September, additional restrictions on gatherings will be lifted. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government.
    Travellers on public transport in New Zealand or taking flights are required to wear a face covering. This does not include taxi or rideshare passengers, school buses, chartered tours, inter-island ferries and private flights. The requirement applies only to people over the age of 12. People with a disability or a physical or mental condition that makes covering their face difficult are not required to wear one. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government.

    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected.

    New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    21.09.2020
  • New Zealand Authorities suspend nonessential outbound travel; government prepares to extend ban on inbound travel for at least another 30 days (RNZ, 31.08.2020). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown in Auckland through 30 August (Reuters, 23.08.2020). Airlines restrict operations as lockdown extended. Auckland will remain at Level 3 with the rest of the country to remain at Level 2 until 26 August. (Ch-Aviation, 17.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures [https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/pm-comments-auckland-covid-19-case]. New Zealand is currently at Level 2 of its Covid-19 Alert Level System. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures introduced from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. Travellers on public transport in New Zealand or taking flights are required to wear a face covering. This does not include taxi or rideshare passengers, school buses, chartered tours, inter-island ferries and private flights. The requirement applies only to people over the age of 12. People with a disability or a physical or mental condition that makes covering their face difficult are not required to wear one. Detailed information on face coverings is available from the New Zealand government [https://covid19.govt.nz/health-and-wellbeing/protect-yourself-and-others/wear-a-face-covering/].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    01.09.2020
  • New Zealand Government extends COVID-19 lockdown in Auckland through 30 August (Reuters, 23.08.2020). Airlines restrict operations as lockdown extended. Auckland will remain at Level 3 with the rest of the country to remain at Level 2 until 26 August. (Ch-Aviation, 17.08.2020) Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News, 18.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities [https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/pm-comments-auckland-covid-19-case], the New Zealand Government has announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures. At 12 noon local time on Wednesday 12 August, Auckland region (Auckland Council area) moved to Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand moved to Alert Level 2. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures being introduced, including the use of face coverings, from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]]. Travellers on public transport in New Zealand or taking flights are required to wear a face covering. This does not include taxi or rideshare passengers, chartered tours, inter-island ferries and private flights. The requirement applies only to people over the age of 12. People with a disability or a physical or mental condition that makes covering their face difficult are not required to wear one. Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    27.08.2020
  • New Zealand Government extends COVID-19 lockdown in Auckland through 30 August (Reuters, 23.08.2020). Airlines restrict operations as lockdown extended. Auckland will remain at Level 3 with the rest of the country to remain at Level 2 until 26 August. (Ch-Aviation, 17.08.2020) Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News, 18.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government has announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures. At 12 noon local time on Wednesday 12 August, Auckland region (Auckland Council area) moved to Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand moved to Alert Level 2. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures being introduced from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Travellers on all forms of public transport in New Zealand (including taxis and Ubers) or taking flights are required to wear a mask.

    Read more
    24.08.2020
  • New Zealand Airlines restrict operations as lockdown extended. Auckland will remain at Level 3 with the rest of the country to remain at Level 2 until 26 August. (Ch-Aviation, 17.08.2020) Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News, 18.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government has announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures. At 12 noon local time on Wednesday 12 August, Auckland region (Auckland Council area) moved to Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand moved to Alert Level 2. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures being introduced from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    17.08.2020
  • New Zealand Lockdown in New Zealand’s Largest City After First Local Covid-19 Case in 102 days (India News, 11.08.2020). Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News, 18.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. People transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].
    Travellers may continue to undertake domestic travel by plane or road in order to connect with international flight departures from Auckland. If arriving in Auckland by plane from another destination in New Zealand to connect with an international flight, you must stay in the airport, and cannot remain for more than 12 hours. International transits through Auckland airport are not affected. All travellers on flights departing Auckland are required to wear a mask.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government has announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures. At 12 noon local time on Wednesday 12 August, Auckland region (Auckland Council area) moved to Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand moved to Alert Level 2. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures being introduced from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    12.08.2020
  • New Zealand Lockdown in New Zealand’s Largest City After First Local Covid-19 Case in 102 days (India News, 11.08.2020).Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News 18, 08..2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.

    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.

    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:

    partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand essential health workers other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand critical humanitarian travelmaritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    After confirmation of new cases of Covid-19 outside of Managed Isolation or Quarantine facilities, the New Zealand Government has announced the re-introduction of some lockdown measures. At 12 noon local time on Wednesday 12 August, Auckland region (Auckland Council area) will move to Alert Level 3. The rest of New Zealand will move to Alert Level 2. You can find detailed information on the alert levels and the measures being introduced from the New Zealand Government [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic).

    Read more
    11.08.2020
  • New Zealand Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News 18, 08.07.2020). Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. From 1 August 2020, pre-departure Coronavirus testing will be mandatory for flights with Emirates and Etihad airlines.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents; Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand; essential health workers; other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government; Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel; New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand; critical humanitarian travel; maritime crew/ On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/covid-19/border-closures-and-exceptions].
    Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. On 29 July, the New Zealand government announced the introduction of legislation that proposes charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders who enter temporarily, or who leave New Zealand after the regulations come into force.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The State of National Emergency has now been lifted.
    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/]. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/alert-system-overview/#alert-level-1-%E2%80%94-prepare] meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://covid19.govt.nz/].

    Read more
    07.08.2020
  • New Zealand Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News 18, 08.07.2020). Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals. From 1 August 2020, pre-departure Coronavirus testing will be mandatory for flights with Emirates and Etihad airlines.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents; Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand; essential health workers; other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government; Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel; New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand; critical humanitarian travel; maritime crew/ On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/covid-19/border-closures-and-exceptions].
    Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. On 29 July, the New Zealand government announced the introduction of legislation that proposes charges for managed isolation for New Zealanders who enter temporarily, or who leave New Zealand after the regulations come into force.
    **Transit: Transit Visa Waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider]. nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available at [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/]. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/alert-system-overview/#alert-level-1-%E2%80%94-prepare] meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. The State of National Emergency has now been lifted.

    Read more
    29.07.2020
  • New Zealand Air New Zealand puts hold on new bookings for flights into country for three weeks (News 18. 08.07.2020). Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption. There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process: partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents; Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand
    essential health workers; other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government; Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel; New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand
    critical humanitarian travel; maritime crew. On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/covid-19/border-closures-and-exceptions]. The website also includes information on how to submit a request for travel to New Zealand [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/formshelp/request-for-travel-to-new-zealand]. A request for approval to travel to New Zealand can take up to two days to process.
    Anyone entering New Zealand is required to undergo quarantine or managed isolation in an approved facility for a minimum of 14 days. Arrivals must then test negative for COVID-19 before entering the community. There are a few exceptional circumstances in which people can apply for an exemption from managed isolation. Visit the New Zealand Ministry of Health website for more information [https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-current-situation/covid-19-border-controls]
    .
    *****Transit:
    From 20 June, transit visa waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/transit-visa-waiver-country/slider] and visa waiver [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/transit-visa#https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/general-information/visa-waiver-countries/slider] nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online. See Information about NZeTA for further detail [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/about-visa/nzeta]. If the passport holder is not from a visa-waiver or transit visa-waiver country or territory, or covered by one of the situations listed above, then they will need to apply for a transit visa. Due to COVID-19, Immigration New Zealand is not currently accepting paper applications for transit visas so have put a temporary process in place for submitting applications by email. The process for applying for a transit visa via email is available on the Immigration New Zealand website – transits [https://www.immigration.govt.nz/new-zealand-visas/apply-for-a-visa/tools-and-information/your-journey-to-new-zealand/before-you-travel-to-new-zealand/transit-passengers].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/]. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 [https://covid19.govt.nz/covid-19/restrictions/alert-system-overview/#alert-level-1-%E2%80%94-prepare] meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://covid19.govt.nz/]. The State of National Emergency has now been lifted.

    Read more
    22.07.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals, with border restrictions remaining in place
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    Partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents.
    Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand.
    Essential health workers.
    Other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government.
    Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel.
    New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand.
    Critical humanitarian travel.
    Maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.
    .
    *****Transit:
    On 19 June the general suspension on transit through New Zealand expired. From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The State of National Emergency has now been lifted. The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website. [https://uniteforrecovery.govt.nz/]

    Read more
    02.07.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    The New Zealand border is currently closed to almost all arrivals.
    New Zealand citizens and residents returning to New Zealand may travel to New Zealand and do not need any formal exemption.
    There are a small number of additional, limited exceptions to the ban on travelling to and entering New Zealand. The following people should seek approval from Immigration New Zealand (INZ) using the limited exceptions process:
    Partners, dependent children (aged 24 years and under) and legal guardians of New Zealand citizens and residents.
    Australian citizens and permanent residents who normally live in New Zealand.
    Essential health workers.
    Other essential workers who are specifically agreed to by the New Zealand Government.
    Samoan and Tongan citizens making essential travel.
    New Zealand-based partners and dependent children (aged 19 years and under) of a work or student visa holder who is in New Zealand.
    Critical humanitarian travel.
    Maritime crew.
    On 12 June, the Government introduced short term and long-term criteria for “Other Essential Workers” requests. Further information on the criteria, as well as full details of the current border closures and exceptions can be found on the INZ website.
    .

    *****Transit:
    On 19 June the general suspension on transit through New Zealand expired. From 20 June, transit visa waiver and visa waiver nationalities, people transiting to or from Australia and people departing a Pacific country or territory to return home, do not require a transit visa as long as they have a confirmed flight out of New Zealand within 24 hours to a port which will accept them. In most cases, transit passengers must hold an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) or transit ETA before travel. These are applied for online.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://uniteforrecovery.govt.nz/]

    Read more
    29.06.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)
    *****International Restrictions:
    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia and New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to residents of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by New Zealand.
    – Effective until 4 September 2020, this does not apply to nationals of Fiji returning directly via New Zealand to Fiji.
    – Effective until 19 September 2020, this does not apply to passengers in Cook Isl., Fiji, French Polynesia, Kiribati, Micronesia (Federated States), Nauru, New Caledonia, Niue, Northern Mariana Isl., Samoa, Samoa (American), Solomon Isl., Tonga, Tuvalu or Vanuatu, if they are returning via New Zealand to their country of residence.
    3. Transit is only allowed for maximum 24 hours at Auckland (AKL).
    4. Passengers are subject to medical screening and quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers in transit.
    5. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to quarantine.

    *****Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://uniteforrecovery.govt.nz/]

    Read more
    22.06.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)
    *****International Restrictions:
    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to accredited diplomats residing in New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of New Zealand and their immediate family members, if they are residing in Australia and transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Australia and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Chile or Fiji and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Chile.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA , Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return directly to one of the above countries.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to first reach Canada, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Qatar or USA, in order to return to one of the above countries.
    3. Passengers will be subject to mandatory isolation at a Government facility for 14 days on arrival.
    – This does not apply to passengers transiting through New Zealand.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.

    *****Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The New Zealand Government has introduced a four-level national COVID-19 alert system. At 2359 local time on Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction. New Zealand’s border restrictions remain in place and public health measures remain unchanged (wash hands and high-touch surfaces regularly, stay home if sick, and get tested if symptomatic). Full details on the New Zealand Government’s coronavirus national response alert system and the requirements for each level can be found on the New Zealand Government COVID-19 website [https://uniteforrecovery.govt.nz/]

    Read more
    17.06.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)
    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to accredited diplomats residing in New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of New Zealand and their immediate family members, if they are residing in Australia and transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Australia and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Chile or Fiji and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Chile.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA , Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return directly to one of the above countries.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to first reach Canada, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Qatar or USA, in order to return to one of the above countries.
    3. Passengers will be subject to mandatory isolation at a Government facility for 14 days on arrival.
    – This does not apply to passengers transiting through New Zealand.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.

    *****Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The State of National Emergency has now been lifted.
    On Monday 8 June 2020, New Zealand moved to Alert Level 1 meaning people can gather and return to work, school, sports and domestic travel without restriction.

    Read more
    16.06.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)
    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to accredited diplomats residing in New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of New Zealand and their immediate family members, if they are residing in Australia and transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Australia and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Chile or Fiji and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Chile.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA , Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return directly to one of the above countries.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to first reach Canada, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Qatar or USA, in order to return to one of the above countries.
    3. Passengers will be subject to mandatory isolation at a Government facility for 14 days on arrival.
    – This does not apply to passengers transiting through New Zealand.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.

    Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    Internal restrictions:

    The state of emergency has been lifted. The country has transitioned into Alert Level 2 since 13 May. Most businesses, including retail, malls, restaurants, cinemas, playgrounds and gyms are gradually reopening. Schools and bars can open. However, gatherings of more than ten people remain banned. Domestic travel, including for tourism, will be permitted but travellers have to keep note of services used and close contacts during movement. Public transport such as buses and trains will be allowed with no more than 50% occupancy rate. Physical distancing and contact registers where required will remain in place.

    Read more
    11.06.2020
  • New Zealand Prime minister lifts COVID-19 measures from 9 June; border closure restrictions to remain (Reuters, 08.06.2020)
    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to accredited diplomats residing in New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of New Zealand and their immediate family members, if they are residing in Australia and transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Australia and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Chile or Fiji and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Chile.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA , Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return directly to one of the above countries.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Isl., Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to first reach Canada, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Qatar or USA, in order to return to one of the above countries.
    3. Passengers will be subject to mandatory isolation at a Government facility for 14 days on arrival.
    – This does not apply to passengers transiting through New Zealand.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.

    Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    Internal restrictions:

    The state of emergency has been lifted. The country has transitioned into Alert Level 2 since 13 May. Most businesses, including retail, malls, restaurants, cinemas, playgrounds and gyms are gradually reopening. Schools and bars can open. However, gatherings of more than ten people remain banned. Domestic travel, including for tourism, will be permitted but travellers have to keep note of services used and close contacts during movement. Public transport such as buses and trains will be allowed with no more than 50% occupancy rate. Physical distancing and contact registers where required will remain in place.

    Read more
    09.06.2020
  • New Zealand 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    – This does not apply to nationals of New Zealand (including Cook Isl., Niue, Tokelau).
    – This does not apply to the immediate family members of nationals of New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a permanent resident visa and their immediate family members.
    – This does not apply to accredited diplomats residing in New Zealand.
    – This does not apply to nationals of Australia ordinarily resident in New Zealand.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of New Zealand and their immediate family members, if they are residing in Australia and transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Australia and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Australia.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Chile and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return to Chile.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA , Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to return directly to one of the above countries.
    – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Czechia, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, North Macedonia (Rep.), Norway, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, USA, Uruguay and their immediate family members, if they are transiting through New Zealand to first reach Canada, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Malaysia, Qatar or USA, in order to return to one of the above countries.
    3. Passengers will be subject to mandatory isolation at a Government facility for 14 days on arrival.
    – This does not apply to passengers transiting through New Zealand.
    4. Airline crew must use appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). They are not subject to mandatory isolation.

    Transit:
    New Zealand has entered into reciprocal transit arrangements with numerous countries in order to make it easier for citizens to return to their home countries. Nationals of countries party to the transit agreements must also meet strict criteria to transit via New Zealand. Those requirements include that transiting passengers: Must remain airside; Cannot enter New Zealand; Have a maximum ten-hour window to leave on their onward flight; Must have no COVID-19 symptoms, no contact with a suspected or confirmed case and not be awaiting test results; and Must have confirmation from the airline that they will be permitted to board for their entire journey – as well as confirmation prior to boarding that their destination country will permit arrival.

    Internal restrictions:

    The state of emergency has been lifted. The country has transitioned into Alert Level 2 since 13 May. Most businesses, including retail, malls, restaurants, cinemas, playgrounds and gyms are gradually reopening. Schools and bars can open. However, gatherings of more than ten people remain banned. Domestic travel, including for tourism, will be permitted but travellers have to keep note of services used and close contacts during movement. Public transport such as buses and trains will be allowed with no more than 50% occupancy rate. Physical distancing and contact registers where required will remain in place.

    Read more
    05.06.2020
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    OSAC Travel Advisories/
    NZ Covid Information/
    #Oceania/Australia, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #