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Taiwan travel restrictions

Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: yes with restriction Quarantine: yes
Airlines Updates

Published on 26.10.2020
UNI Air schedules Kinmen – Hualien charters in late-Oct 2020

26.10.2020 Starlux Airlines on Sunday (25OCT20) announced network expansion, as the airline plans service to Thailand and Japan. The airline plans to open reservation for flights to Bangkok and Osaka from 02NOV20, followed by Tokyo by mid-November. Planned operational schedule, subject to Government Approval, as follows.

Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok eff 01DEC20 2 weekly A321neo
JX741 TPE1400 – 1700BKK 32Q 25
JX742 BKK1805 – 2240TPE 32Q 25

Taipei Taoyuan – Osaka Kansai eff 15DEC20 2 weekly A321neo
JX820 TPE0830 – 1150KIX 32Q 25
JX821 KIX1250 – 1500TPE 32Q 25

Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita eff 16DEC20 2 weekly A321neo
JX800 TPE0825 – 1230NRT 32Q 36
JX801 NRT1400 – 1705TPE 32Q 36

Published on 25.10.2020
EVA Air resumes flights between Taipei and Bangkok; China Airlines plans resumption in November

Published on 12.10.2020
EVA Air resumes two-way Taipei – Bangkok pax flights from late-Oct 2020

Published on 01.10.2020
China Airlines resumes Kaohsiung / Taichung – Hong Kong service in 4Q20

17.09.2020 EVA Air this week filed changes for service to the US West Coast in the 4th quarter of 2020. From 25OCT20 to December, the airline schedules following flights for Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 25OCT20 – 31DEC20 Reduce from 21 to 4 weekly (Previously only 7 weekly open for reservation until 30NOV20)
BR012 TPE1920 – 1450LAX 77W x357
BR011 LAX2305 – 0540+2TPE 77W x246

Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 25OCT20 – 14DEC20 Reduce from 21 to 3 weekly
BR018 TPE1950 – 1450SFO 77W 357
BR017 SFO0005 – 0555+1TPE 77W 146

04.09.2020 China Airlines Group in the last few days filed planned operation for the month of October 2020, from 01OCT20 to 31OCT20. Planned operation as of 03SEP20 as follows.

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation, including passenger traffic rights on certain direction. Additional changes remain possible.

Kaohsiung – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly
Kaohsiung – Xiamen 1 weekly (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Song Shan – Shanghai Pu Dong 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Amsterdam 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Auckland TPE departs on 27OCT20
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 5 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Brisbane Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Chengdu 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Frankfurt 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Fukuoka 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Hanoi 5 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Ho Chi Minh City 5 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Hong Kong 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Jakarta 1 daily
Taipei Taoyuan – Kuala Lumpur 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 5 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Melbourne Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Nagoya 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – New York JFK Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Osaka Kansai 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Phnom Penh 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Seoul Incheon 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Singapore 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Sydney TPE departs on 02OCT20, 14OCT20, 28OCT20
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 2 weekly (3 weekly from 13OCT20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Vancouver 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Xiamen 2 weekly (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Taoyuan – Yangon 2 weekly

Published on 03.09.2020
EVA Air Sep/Oct 2020 Taipei – London operations as of 02SEP20

01.09.2020 China Airlines in last week’s schedule update updated initial changes for Northern winter 2020/21 season. Between 25OCT20 and 31DEC20, the Skyteam member will continue to cancel nearly 50 routes. The airline also scheduled additional adjustments on selected regional routes in winter season.

China Airlines service cancelled until 31DEC20 (Including reservation closure):
Kaohsiung – Hong Kong
Kaohsiung – Kumamoto
Kaohsiung – Osaka Kansai
Kaohsiung – Sapporo New Chitose
Kaohsiung – Seoul Incheon
Kaohsiung – Tokyo Narita
Taichung – Hong Kong
Taichung – Okinawa
Taichung – Tokyo Narita
Tainan – Hong Kong
Tainan – Osaka Kansai
Taipei Song Shan – Seoul Gimpo
Taipei Taoyuan – Busan
Taipei Taoyuan – Changsha
Taipei Taoyuan – Chongqing
Taipei Taoyuan – Delhi
Taipei Taoyuan – Denpasar
Taipei Taoyuan – Haikou
Taipei Taoyuan – Hiroshima
Taipei Taoyuan – Honolulu
Taipei Taoyuan – Kagoshima
Taipei Taoyuan – Miyazaki
Taipei Taoyuan – Nanchang
Taipei Taoyuan – Ontario
Taipei Taoyuan – Qingdao
Taipei Taoyuan – Rome
Taipei Taoyuan – Sanya
Taipei Taoyuan – Shizuoka
Taipei Taoyuan – Takamatsu
Taipei Taoyuan – Toyama
Taipei Taoyuan – Vienna
Taipei Taoyuan – Wuhan
Taipei Taoyuan – Wuxi
Taipei Taoyuan – Xi’An
Taipei Taoyuan – Xuzhou

Mandarin Airlines service cancelled until 31DEC20 (Including reservation closure):
Kaohsiung – Changsha
Kaohsiung – Hangzhou
Kaohsiung – Hong Kong
Taipei Song Shan – Fuzhou
Taipei Song Shan – Wenzhou
Taipei Song Shan – Wuhan
Taipei Taoyuan – Changsha
Taipei Taoyuan – Nanjing
Taipei Taoyuan – Ningbo
Taipei Taoyuan – Shenyang
Taipei Taoyuan – Zhengzhou
Other service adjustment for winter
Kaohsiung – Hong Kong eff 01JAN21 Upon service resumption, Mandarin Airlines service increase from 1 to 2 daily (Overall service increases to 5 daily)
AE981 KHH0830 – 1005HKG E90 D
AE983 KHH1335 – 1510HKG E90 D

AE982 HKG1105 – 1240KHH E90 D
AE984 HKG1610 – 1745KHH E90 D

Kaohsiung – Xiamen 25OCT20 – 31DEC20 1 of 3 weekly open for reservation, Mandarin Airlines service
Taichung – Hong Kong eff 01JAN21 Upon service resumption, Mandarin Airlines service reduces from 4 to 3 daily
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow Previously reported on Airlineroute, CI will continue to operate London Heathrow service until 27MAR21, instead of Gatwick. A350-900XWB operates 4 weekly

Further changes will be filed in the next few weeks.

Published on 29.08.2020
EVA Air moves Milan / Phuket launch to July 2021 as of 28AUG20

28.08.2020 tigerair Taiwan this week filed planned operation for the remainder of 2020, as the airline updates International network between 01OCT20 and 31DEC20. In the 4th quarter, the airline continues to operate following reduced service.

Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly

Published on 27.08.2020
tigerair Taiwan 4Q20 International operations as of 25AUG20

26.08.2020 Starlux Airlines last week filed planned operation for the month of September 2020, with frequency changes for Macau and Penang. Planned operation as follows.

Taipei Taoyuan – Macau 1 daily (Increase from 5 weekly in August 2020)
JX205 TPE1840 – 2025MFM 32Q D
JX206 MFM2125 – 2315TPE 32Q D

Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 2 weekly (reduce from 3 weekly in August 2020)
JX721 TPE0940 – 1410PEN 32Q 26
JX722 PEN1510 – 2000TPE 32Q 26

Published on 25.08.2020
China Airlines Sep 2020 operations as of 21AUG20
Starlux Airlines Sep 2020 operations as of 21AUG20

Published on 19.08.2020
EVA Air 25OCT20 – 30NOV20 Preliminary inventory adjustment

Published on 14.08.2020
China Airlines Aug/Sep 2020 Taipei – Seoul operations as of 13AUG20

14.08.2020 EVA Air this week filed planned operation for the period of 01SEP20 – 24OCT20. As of 13AUG20, planned operation as follows. Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s passenger traffic rights on certain sector/direction.

The following list excludes Cross-strait service to Mainland China.

Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 3 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok – Amsterdam 787-10 operates every 2 weeks
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok – Vienna 787-10 operates on 18/19SEP20, 16/17OCT20 (from Asia)
Taipei Taoyuan – Cebu eff 18SEP20 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Chicago O’Hare 2 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Fukuoka 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Hanoi 4 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Ho Chi Minh City 4 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Hong Kong 4 weekly 787-10
Taipei Taoyuan – Jakarta 2 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 777-300ER operates every 2 weeks
Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 4 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Macau 3 weekly A321/330-200
Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 4 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – New York JFK 3 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Osaka Kansai 2 weekly 787-10
Taipei Taoyuan – Paris CDG 1 weekly 787-9 (787-10 operating in October 2020)
Taipei Taoyuan – Phnom Penh 4 weekly A321/330-200
Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Seattle 3 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Seoul Incheon 2 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Singapore 2 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 3 weekly 787-9
Taipei Taoyuan – Toronto 2 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Vancouver 3 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Vienna 787-10 operates on 25-26SEP20, 787-9 operates on 23-24OCT20

Published on 06.08.2020
Starlux Airlines increases Macau flights from mid-August 2020
EVA Air resumes Taipei Taoyuan – Shanghai Pu Dong service from late-August 2020
EVA Air in the last few days filed changes to European network for the remainder of Northern summer 2020 season. From 01SEP20 to 24OCT20, planned operation as of 12AUG20 as follows.

Various travel restrictions remain in effect, impacting the airline’s passenger traffic rights on certain sector and direction. Additional changes to be filed in the next few weeks.

Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok – Amsterdam 787-10 operates every 2 weeks
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok – Vienna 787-10 operates on 18/19SEP20, 16/17OCT20 (from Asia)
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 777-300ER operates every 2 weeks
Taipei Taoyuan – Paris CDG 1 weekly 787-9 (787-10 operating in October 2020)
Taipei Taoyuan – Vienna 787-10 operates on 25-26SEP20, 787-9 operates on 23-24OCT20

Published on 05.08.2020
China Airlines August 2020 operations as of 03AUG20

31.07.2020 tigerair Taiwan yesterday (30JUL20) announced planned operation for September 2020. Planned operation for the month of August / September 2020 as follows.

Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok Don Mueang eff 03SEP20 1 weekly (Day 4)
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly (Day 4)

The airline starting this week also cancelled Taipei Taoyuan – Osaka Kansai service.

Published on 29.07.2020
EVA Air August 2020 Paris aircraft changes as of 28JUL20
Mandarin Airlines W20 Taichung – Hong Kong operation changes as of 28JUL20

Published on 27.07.2020
EVA Air August 2020 Operations as of 24JUL20

Published on 24.07.2020
China Airlines schedules one-time Kaohsiung – Hong Kong flight in early-August 2020

21.07.2020 Starlux Airlines today (21JUL20) filed service changes for its August 2020 schedule, which sees the airline increases Macau and Penang service, in comparison to July 2020 schedule.

Taipei Taoyuan – Macau 4 weekly (Increase from 3 in July)
JX205 TPE1840 – 2025MFM 32Q x146
JX206 MFM2125 – 2315TPE 32Q x146

Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 3 weekly (Increase from 2 in July)
JX721 TPE0800 – 1230PEN 32Q 246
JX722 PEN1330 – 1815TPE 32Q 246
Published on 17.07.2020
China Airlines delays planned Oct 2020 Cebu / Chiang Mai launch
China Airlines to resume New York service in late-July 2020

Published on 10.07.2020
China Airlines August – October 2020 London Heathrow frequency changes

25.06.2020
Starlux Airline
s on Tuesday (23JUN20) provided new update to its interim schedule for the month of July 2020. Latest adjustment sees schedule reduction for Penang, compared to initial plan released earlier this month.

Taipei Taoyuan – Macau 3 weekly A321neo
JX201 TPE0820 – 1005MFM 32Q 257
JX202 MFM1105 – 1300TPE 32Q 257

Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 2 weekly A321neo (Increase from 1 weekly in June 2020; Previous plan: 1 daily)
JX721 TPE0800 – 1230PEN 32Q 24
JX722 PEN1330 – 1820TPE 32Q 24

Published on 25.06.2020
China Airlines Group July 2020 International operations as of 24JUN20

Published on 10.06.2020
Starlux Airlines July 2020 operations as of 09JUN20

Published on 09.06.2020
China Airlines to resume Taipei – London Heathrow service in July 2020

Published on 03.06.2020
tigerair Taiwan extends interim schedule to late-August 2020

Read more
Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Taiwan
Crossing Rules
  • Passengers are not permitted to enter Taiwan.
  • This does not apply to the following passengers:
    • Nationals of Taiwan,
    • Passengers holding a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) issued by Taiwan,
    • Passengers with an approval for entry, provided holding a negative Covid-19 test certificate in English obtained within 3 working days prior to departure to Taiwan.
    • Nationals of China, provided they meet any of the following requirements:
      • Passengers who are spouses of Taiwan nationals, children aged under 6 years old (born on or after 13th August, 2014) or students approved by Taiwan Ministry of Education (including their companion parents), provided holding a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or resident visa issued by Taiwan,
      • Spouses of Taiwan nationals and their children aged under 6 years old (born on or after 13th August, 2014) with an entry permit issued by Taiwan, provided holding a negative Covid-19 test certificate obtained within 3 working days prior to departure to Taiwan,
      • Spouses of foreign nationals and their underage children aged under 18 years old, provided they are accompanied by the foreign national and are travelling to visit families with an entry permit issued by Taiwan. These passengers are required to hold a negative Covid-19 test certificate obtained within 3 working days prior to departure to Taiwan,
      • Parents of children aged under 6 years old travelling to join their family, provided holding an entry permit issued by Taiwan and a negative Covid-19 test certificate obtained within 3 working days prior to departure to Taiwan,
      • Students approved by Taiwan Ministry of Education with an entry permit issued by Taiwan,
      • Passengers (including their companions) travelling to receive medical care approved by Taiwan Ministry of Health and Welfare, provided holding a negative Covid-19 test certificate obtained within 3 working days prior to departure to Taiwan.
Read more
Flight Restrictions

Published on 27.11.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers with an Alien Resident – Certificate.
– This does not apply to passengers traveling on business. They must be able to prove their business travel purpose.
– This does not apply to passengers with a “SPECIAL ENTRY PERMIT FOR COVID-19 OUTBREAK” visa.

Passengers must have a medical certificate in Chinese or English with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) RT-PCR test result issued at most 3 working days before departure. The certificate can also be in French or Spanish if the official language of the departing country is French or Spanish.
– This does not apply to passengers with Alien Resident Certificate.
– This does not apply to passengers with a resident visa.
– This does not apply to passengers with a visa with remark “DC”, “FD”, “FO”, “O”, “FL”, “FC”, “FS” or “ER”.
– This does not apply to passengers with a MOFA ID.

A completed “Quarantine System for Entry Form” must be submitted before departure at hdhq.mohw.gov.tw.

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Quarantine

Quarantine requirement at government designated site or own accommodation.

From 23 December 2020, all passengers arriving directly from the UK, or those who have been in the UK in the previous 14 days, will be required to complete their mandatory 14 day quarantine at a designated quarantine centre. This applies to all nationalities and is irrespective of the purpose of travel. Upon completion of this 14 day quarantine, all passengers will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave quarantine. All associated quarantine costs are self-funded. An additional 7 day self-health management period will then be required. Passengers arriving before 23 December 2020 will be permitted to continue their mandatory quarantine in a designated quarantine hotel, or in their homes if they are residents.

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Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.

From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure.

Read more

Full Restrictions

  • Taiwan Latest News: Government bans entry of non-resident travelers because of COVID-19 concerns (Kyodo News, 31.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to Taiwan: From 1 January 2021, foreign nationals are not permitted to enter Taiwan. The local authorities have confirmed that resident visa holders, diplomats, business passengers with special entry permits and spouses and children of Taiwanese nationals will be exempt from this restriction. Please refer to your local Taipei Representative Office for further information regarding obtaining travel exemption permissions.
    In addition, all direct passenger flights between Taiwan and the UK will be suspended. We encourage any passengers to contact their airline if they believe they may be impacted and to monitor advice provided by the local authorities.
    Any passengers who arrived in Taiwan between 13 and 22 December 2020 who have spent time in the UK in the previous 14 days, will be contacted by Taiwan’s CDC or the local health authority to take a COVID-19 test at the end of their quarantine period, or immediately if they have already left quarantine. There will be no charge for the test itself; however, those affected will need to pay for any related fees depending on their individual circumstances, including whether or not they are enrolled in Taiwan’s National Health Insurance scheme.
    Since 23 December 2020, all passengers arriving directly from the UK, or those who have been in the UK in the previous 14 days, are required to have a PCR test upon arrival in Taiwan. If the test result is negative, they are then required to complete their mandatory 14 day quarantine at a designated quarantine centre. A positive test will mean hospitalisation. This applies to all nationalities and is irrespective of the purpose of travel. Upon completion of this 14 day quarantine, all passengers are required to provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave quarantine. An additional 7 day self-health management period is then required.
    The Taiwanese authorities have provided the following information about the quarantine centres:
    • Quarantine centres are designated locations selected by the Central Epidemic Command Centre (CECC). Designated locations include: Government owned facilities, student dorms and hotels. There are currently a total of 29 quarantine centres located across northern, central and southern Taiwan.
    • Upon arrival in Taiwan, transportation will be arranged by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    • Costs for travellers in the UK programme will be paid for by the Taiwan authorities.
    • All travellers in the UK programme will be transferred to a Quarantine Centre designated by the CECC, and will not be able to request a specific location or room.
    • Quarantine centres provide 3 meals per day. Meals will be delivered to people’s rooms and consumed there.
    • You will not be allowed to leave your room or go into another individual’s room during this period. In a case of an emergency, all individuals must follow the instructions provided by the quarantine centre.
    • In principle, only 1 person is allowed per room. For young children under the age of 12, and individuals who may require health and medical care, one family member would be allowed to stay in the same room with this individual, however, masks must be worn at all times. Requests for exemptions will be reviewed by the quarantine centre in question.
    • Relatives are not allowed to have physical contact with any individual during quarantine; however, they would be able to deliver packages to the individual by handing this to the reception staff at the quarantine centre. This would then be passed to the individual.
    • Due to safety concerns the following items are not accepted: fresh products including fruit and vegetables, high power-consuming electronic appliances and other dangerous items such as lighters and knifes. Alcohol consumption and smoking is prohibited in the quarantine centre.
    • Room facilities: All rooms are equipped with Wi-Fi, a kettle and a television.
    If you have any questions regarding the quarantine centres, please contact the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure.
    The test needs to have taken place within three working days before their date of departure. Test Certificates of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR must be issued by a recognised medical institution in the country of departure and include the following information: the passenger’s full name as per their passport, the date of birth or passport number of the traveller, specimen collection date and test report date, the virus name, testing method and the test result. Test Certificates are required to be produced in either English or Chinese; however, in situations where the passenger provides a certificate in either French or Spanish, if the certificate is in the official language of the place of departure, and ground personnel of the airline are able to assist with the inspection of the content, the certificate may be accepted.
    Anyone found to provide false or incorrect test results, or evade or obstruct the quarantine measures, may face a fine of between NT$10,000 to NT$150,000 and further criminal charges.
    Refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control for further information regarding Test Exemptions, Test Certificates and COVID-19 test requirements.
    If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO) or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed, so may change at short notice.

    The Taiwanese authorities announced in March that travellers already in Taiwan who arrived under a visa waiver, visitor visa or landing visa before 21 March, and had not overstayed their entry conditions, would be granted an automatic 30-day extension of their stay. This has now been extended by further 30 day periods. The extension will be applied automatically, no application is required. Your total period of stay, including extensions, cannot exceed 330 days (comprised of 180 days on a visitor visa, plus five automatic 30 day extensions). For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA).
    *Transiting Taiwan: Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    01.01.2021
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to Taiwan: From 1 January 2021, foreign nationals are not permitted to enter Taiwan. The local authorities have confirmed that resident visa holders, diplomats, business passengers with special entry permits and spouses and children of Taiwanese nationals will be exempt from this restriction. Please refer to your local Taipei Representative Office for further information regarding obtaining travel exemption permissions. In addition, all direct passenger flights between Taiwan and the UK will be suspended. We encourage any passengers to contact their airline if they believe they may be impacted and to monitor advice provided by the local authorities.
    Since 23 December 2020, all passengers arriving directly from the UK, or those who have been in the UK in the previous 14 days, are required to have a PCR test upon arrival in Taiwan. If the test result is negative, they are then required to complete their mandatory 14 day quarantine at a designated quarantine centre. A positive test will mean hospitalisation. This applies to all nationalities and is irrespective of the purpose of travel. Upon completion of this 14 day quarantine, all passengers are required to provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave quarantine. An additional 7 day self-health management period is then required.
    The Taiwanese authorities have provided the following information about the quarantine centres:

    • Quarantine centres are designated locations selected by the Central Epidemic Command Centre (CECC). Designated locations include: Government owned facilities, student dorms and hotels. There are currently a total of 29 quarantine centres located across northern, central and southern Taiwan.
    • Upon arrival in Taiwan, transportation will be arranged by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    • Costs for travellers in the UK programme will be paid for by the Taiwan authorities.
    • All travellers in the UK programme will be transferred to a Quarantine Centre designated by the CECC, and will not be able to request a specific location or room.
    • Quarantine centres provide 3 meals per day. Meals will be delivered to people’s rooms and consumed there.
    • You will not be allowed to leave your room or go into another individual’s room during this period. In a case of an emergency, all individuals must follow the instructions provided by the quarantine centre.
    • In principle, only 1 person is allowed per room. For young children under the age of 12, and individuals who may require health and medical care, one family member would be allowed to stay in the same room with this individual, however, masks must be worn at all times. Requests for exemptions will be reviewed by the quarantine centre in question.
    • Relatives are not allowed to have physical contact with any individual during quarantine; however, they would be able to deliver packages to the individual by handing this to the reception staff at the quarantine centre. This would then be passed to the individual.
    • Due to safety concerns the following items are not accepted: fresh products including fruit and vegetables, high power-consuming electronic appliances and other dangerous items such as lighters and knifes. Alcohol consumption and smoking is prohibited in the quarantine centre.
    • Room facilities: All rooms are equipped with Wi-Fi, a kettle and a television.
    If you have any questions regarding the quarantine centres, please contact the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure.
    The test needs to have taken place within three working days before their date of departure. Test Certificates of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR must be issued by a recognised medical institution in the country of departure and include the following information: the passenger’s full name as per their passport, the date of birth or passport number of the traveller, specimen collection date and test report date, the virus name, testing method and the test result. Test Certificates are required to be produced in either English or Chinese; however, in situations where the passenger provides a certificate in either French or Spanish, if the certificate is in the official language of the place of departure, and ground personnel of the airline are able to assist with the inspection of the content, the certificate may be accepted.
    Anyone found to provide false or incorrect test results, or evade or obstruct the quarantine measures, may face a fine of between NT$10,000 to NT$150,000 and further criminal charges.
    Refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control for further information regarding Test Exemptions, Test Certificates and COVID-19 test requirements.
    If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO) or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed, so may change at short notice.

    The Taiwanese authorities announced in March that travellers already in Taiwan who arrived under a visa waiver, visitor visa or landing visa before 21 March, and had not overstayed their entry conditions, would be granted an automatic 30-day extension of their stay. This has now been extended by further 30 day periods. The extension will be applied automatically, no application is required. Your total period of stay, including extensions, cannot exceed 330 days (comprised of 180 days on a visitor visa, plus five automatic 30 day extensions). For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA).
    *Transiting Taiwan: Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    30.12.2020
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to Taiwan: From 23 December 2020, all passengers arriving directly from the UK, or those who have been in the UK in the previous 14 days, will be required to complete their mandatory 14 day quarantine at a designated quarantine centre. This applies to all nationalities and is irrespective of the purpose of travel. Upon completion of this 14 day quarantine, all passengers will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave quarantine. All associated quarantine costs are self-funded. An additional 7 day self-health management period will then be required. Passengers arriving before 23 December 2020 will be permitted to continue their mandatory quarantine in a designated quarantine hotel, or in their homes if they are residents.
    The Taiwanese authorities have provided the following information about the quarantine centres: Quarantine centres are designated locations selected by the Central Epidemic Command Centre (CECC). Designated locations include: Government owned facilities, student dorms and hotels. There are currently a total of 29 quarantine centres located across northern, central and southern Taiwan.
    Upon arrival in Taiwan, transportation will be arranged by the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
    Costs for travellers in the UK programme will be paid for by the Taiwan authorities.
    All travellers in the UK programme will be transferred to a Quarantine Centre designated by the CECC, and will not be able to request a specific location or room.
    Quarantine centres provide 3 meals per day. Meals will be delivered to people’s rooms and consumed there.
    You will not be allowed to leave your room or go into another individual’s room during this period. In a case of an emergency, all individuals must follow the instructions provided by the quarantine centre.
    In principle, only 1 person is allowed per room. For young children under the age of 12, and individuals who may require health and medical care, one family member would be allowed to stay in the same room with this individual, however, masks must be worn at all times. Requests for exemptions will be reviewed by the quarantine centre in question.
    Relatives are not allowed to have physical contact with any individual during quarantine; however, they would be able to deliver packages to the individual by handing this to the reception staff at the quarantine centre. This would then be passed to the individual.
    Due to safety concerns the following items are not accepted: fresh products including fruit and vegetables, high power-consuming electronic appliances and other dangerous items such as lighters and knifes. Alcohol consumption and smoking is prohibited in the quarantine centre.
    Room facilities: All rooms are equipped with Wi-Fi and a Television.
    If you have any questions regarding the quarantine centres, please contact the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

    In addition, from 23 December 2020, the frequency of direct flights from the UK to Taiwan will be reduced. Any passengers should contact their airline directly if they believe they may be impacted. From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure. The test needs to have taken place within three working days before their date of departure. Test Certificates of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR must be issued by a recognised medical institution in the country of departure and include the following information: the passenger’s full name as per their passport, the date of birth or passport number of the traveller, specimen collection date and test report date, the virus name, testing method and the test result. Test Certificates are required to be produced in either English or Chinese; however, in situations where the passenger provides a certificate in either French or Spanish, if the certificate is in the official language of the place of departure, and ground personnel of the airline are able to assist with the inspection of the content, the certificate may be accepted.
    Anyone found to provide false or incorrect test results, or evade or obstruct the quarantine measures, may face a fine of between NT$10,000 to NT$150,000 and further criminal charges. Refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control for further information regarding Test Exemptions, Test Certificates and COVID-19 test requirements. Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for tourism or to visit friends. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. The rules on who can enter Taiwan may change at short notice, so you should contact the TRO for the latest information.
    If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO) or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed, so may change at short notice.
    The Taiwanese authorities announced in March that travellers already in Taiwan who arrived under a visa waiver, visitor visa or landing visa before 21 March, and had not overstayed their entry conditions, would be granted an automatic 30-day extension of their stay. This has now been extended by further 30 day periods. The extension will be applied automatically, no application is required. Your total period of stay, including extensions, cannot exceed 330 days (comprised of 180 days on a visitor visa, plus five automatic 30 day extensions). For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA).
    *Transiting Taiwan: Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    24.12.2020
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to Taiwan: From 23 December 2020, all passengers arriving directly from the UK, or those who have been in the UK in the previous 14 days, will be required to complete their mandatory 14 day quarantine at a designated quarantine centre. This applies to all nationalities and is irrespective of the purpose of travel. Upon completion of this 14 day quarantine, all passengers will be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test before they are allowed to leave quarantine. All associated quarantine costs are self-funded. An additional 7 day self-health management period will then be required. Passengers arriving before 23 December 2020 will be permitted to continue their mandatory quarantine in a designated quarantine hotel, or in their homes if they are residents. In addition, from 23 December 2020, the frequency of direct flights from the UK to Taiwan will be reduced. Any passengers should contact their airline directly if they believe they may be impacted. From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure. The test needs to have taken place within three working days before their date of departure. Test Certificates of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR must be issued by a recognised medical institution in the country of departure and include the following information: the passenger’s full name as per their passport, the date of birth or passport number of the traveller, specimen collection date and test report date, the virus name, testing method and the test result. Test Certificates are required to be produced in either English or Chinese; however, in situations where the passenger provides a certificate in either French or Spanish, if the certificate is in the official language of the place of departure, and ground personnel of the airline are able to assist with the inspection of the content, the certificate may be accepted.
    Anyone found to provide false or incorrect test results, or evade or obstruct the quarantine measures, may face a fine of between NT$10,000 to NT$150,000 and further criminal charges. Refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control for further information regarding Test Exemptions, Test Certificates and COVID-19 test requirements. Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for tourism or to visit friends. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. The rules on who can enter Taiwan may change at short notice, so you should contact the TRO for the latest information.
    If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO) or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed, so may change at short notice.
    The Taiwanese authorities announced in March that travellers already in Taiwan who arrived under a visa waiver, visitor visa or landing visa before 21 March, and had not overstayed their entry conditions, would be granted an automatic 30-day extension of their stay. This has now been extended by further 30 day periods. The extension will be applied automatically, no application is required. Your total period of stay, including extensions, cannot exceed 330 days (comprised of 180 days on a visitor visa, plus five automatic 30 day extensions). For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA).
    *Transiting Taiwan: Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    22.12.2020
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to Taiwan: From 9 November all passengers arriving into Taiwan must declare if they have had COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days. If you report symptoms you must have a PCR test at the airport or a hospital immediately after entry into Taiwan. If you test negative you must have a second test after 24 hours. You will have to wait for both results at a designated quarantine centre. If you have two negative results you will be able to leave the quarantine centre and carry out your 14 day self-isolation at your home, if appropriate, or in a designated quarantine hotel. A positive test will mean hospitalisation.
    From 1 December 2020 to 28 February 2021 all passengers, regardless of nationality or travel purpose, arriving or transiting in Taiwan are required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test in order to be able to board their flight to Taiwan. Any exemption due to exceptional circumstances will require prior approval before departure. The test needs to have taken place within three working days before their date of departure. Test Certificates of a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR must be issued by a recognised medical institution in the country of departure and include the following information: the passenger’s full name as per their passport, the date of birth or passport number of the traveller, specimen collection date and test report date, the virus name, testing method and the test result. Test Certificates are required to be produced in either English or Chinese; however, in situations where the passenger provides a certificate in either French or Spanish, if the certificate is in the official language of the place of departure, and ground personnel of the airline are able to assist with the inspection of the content, the certificate may be accepted. Anyone found to provide false or incorrect test results, or evade or obstruct the quarantine measures, may face a fine of between NT$10,000 to NT$150,000 and further criminal charges. Refer to the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control for further information regarding Test Exemptions, Test Certificates and COVID-19 test requirements. Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for tourism or to visit friends. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. The rules on who can enter Taiwan may change at short notice, so you should contact the TRO for the latest information. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111. If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO) or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed, so may change at short notice. The Taiwanese authorities announced in March that travellers already in Taiwan who arrived under a visa waiver, visitor visa or landing visa before 21 March, and had not overstayed their entry conditions, would be granted an automatic 30-day extension of their stay. This has now been extended by further 30 day periods.The extension will be applied automatically, no application is required. Your total period of stay, including extensions, cannot exceed 330 days (comprised of 180 days on a visitor visa, plus five automatic 30 day extensions). For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA).
    If you arrived after 21 March 2020, your maximum stay is determined by your visa. If you wish to stay over 180 days, you may apply to do so if you have a legitimate reason for needing to remain in Taiwan or are unable to leave. Restrictions apply and not all foreign nationals will be eligible. You cannot apply more than 15 days before the 180 day point. For more information, you should contact the National Immigration Agency (NIA) .
    *Quarantine requirements: All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. In addition to completing a health declaration on arrival, you may be asked to install a local SIM card if you do not already have one. Mobile phone location monitoring will be used as part of the quarantine management process by local authorities.
    You will be required to provide temperature and health status updates to local authorities during self-isolation. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from.
    *Transiting Taiwan: Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    02.12.2020
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    From 9 November all passengers arriving into Taiwan must declare if they have had COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days. If you report symptoms you must have a PCR test at the airport or a hospital immediately after entry into Taiwan. If you test negative you must have a second test after 24 hours. You will have to wait for both results at a designated quarantine centre. If you have two negative results you will be able to leave the quarantine centre and carry out your 14 day self-isolation at your home, if appropriate, or in a designated quarantine hotel. A positive test will mean hospitalisation.
    Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for study, tourism or to visit friends.
    Foreign nationals entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed within three working days prior to boarding their entry flight. The type of test required is a RT-PCR test. The certificate with the test result should be in English. You should confirm that the test you intend to take, and the certificate you will receive, meets the requirements set by the authorities in Taiwan. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. The requirement to provide a negative COVID-19 test report does not apply to returning ARC and APRC holders. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    Quarantine requirements – All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. In addition to completing a health declaration on arrival, you may be asked to install a local SIM card if you do not already have one. Mobile phone location monitoring will be used as part of the quarantine management process by local authorities. You will be required to provide temperature and health status updates to local authorities during self-isolation. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from. Travellers from the United Kingdom are required to complete the 14-day quarantine period.
    Transiting Taiwan – New rules allowing transits are in place. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Starting from 1st December 2020, face masks must be worn in the following types of public venues: healthcare facilities, public transportation, places of consumption, learning facilities, sports and exhibition venues, entertainment venues, religious and worship places of worship, offices and business venues. Members of the public who do not wear a face mask as required and refuse to wear a mask after being advised to do so will be fined up to NT$15,000. If individuals choose to dine at the above-mentioned public venues, as long as social distancing is maintained or partitions are installed inside those locations, masks can be temporarily removed while eating.
    *Travel in Taiwan: There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan.
    *Travelling to and from the airport: On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. For more information about self-isolation see Entry requirements.
    Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask.
    *Accommodation: Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.

    Read more
    30.11.2020
  • Taiwan Latest News: Taiwan and Belize have agreed on an open skies policy that allows bilateral flight services (Focus Taiwan, 30.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    From 9 November all passengers arriving into Taiwan must declare if they have had COVID-19 symptoms in the last 14 days. If you report symptoms you must have a PCR test at the airport or a hospital immediately after entry into Taiwan. If you test negative you must have a second test after 24 hours. You will have to wait for both results at a designated quarantine centre. If you have two negative results you will be able to leave the quarantine centre and carry out your 14 day self-isolation at your home, if appropriate, or in a designated quarantine hotel. A positive test will mean hospitalisation.
    Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for study, tourism or to visit friends.
    Foreign nationals entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed within three working days prior to boarding their entry flight. The type of test required is a RT-PCR test. The certificate with the test result should be in English. You should confirm that the test you intend to take, and the certificate you will receive, meets the requirements set by the authorities in Taiwan. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. The requirement to provide a negative COVID-19 test report does not apply to returning ARC and APRC holders. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    Quarantine requirements – All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. In addition to completing a health declaration on arrival, you may be asked to install a local SIM card if you do not already have one. Mobile phone location monitoring will be used as part of the quarantine management process by local authorities. You will be required to provide temperature and health status updates to local authorities during self-isolation. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from. Travellers from the United Kingdom are required to complete the 14-day quarantine period.
    Transiting Taiwan – New rules allowing transits are in place. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan.

    Internal Restrictions:
    There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan. On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask. Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page here. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.
    Face masks must be worn on public transportation. There is no general requirement to wear a face mask in public. Some shops and locations may restrict entry to those wearing face masks. Temperature checks are in operation in many locations.

    Read more
    06.11.2020
  • Taiwan *****International Restrictions:
    Foreign nationals entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed within three working days prior to boarding their entry flight. The type of test required is a RT-PCR test. The certificate with the test result should be in English. You should confirm that the test you intend to take, and the certificate you will receive, meets the requirements set by the authorities in Taiwan. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. The requirement to provide a negative COVID-19 test report does not apply to returning ARC and APRC holders. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC) [https://www.cdc.gov.tw/En]. If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information For Foreigners In Taiwan’ helpline on 0800-024-111.
    All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. In addition to completing a health declaration on arrival, you may be asked to install a local SIM card if you do not already have one. Mobile phone location monitoring will be used as part of the quarantine management process by local authorities. You will be required to provide temperature and health status updates to local authorities during self-isolation. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from. Travellers from the United Kingdom are required to complete the 14-day quarantine period.
    New rules allowing transits are in place. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan. On arrival in Taiwan, you will be required to take an allocated taxi to your self-isolation destination. Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask. Only a limited number of designated quarantine hotels may host self-isolating travellers. If you are planning to stay in a hotel to complete the self-isolation period, you should confirm that a room is available and that it meets your requirements prior to travelling. Due to an increased number of travellers now entering Taiwan, demand for the limited number of hotels permitted to host self-isolating travellers has increased, and you may find it difficult to find accommodation at short notice. For a list of designated quarantine hotels in Taipei, please visit Taipei City Government’s FAQ page [https://english.gov.taipei/News_Content.aspx?n=A0EDC3930FBE7EFC&sms=5B794C46F3CDE718&s=6CBBBD4737D9391D]. If you are planning to stay in a hotel outside of Taipei, you may need to contact the local authority in that area prior to booking or making final arrangements. For more information and contact details, please visit the Taiwan Tourism Bureau’s ‘Taiwan Stay’ website. [https://taiwan.taiwanstay.net.tw/covhotel/]. If you have access to private accommodation in Taiwan, you may choose to self-isolate there rather than in a hotel. You should confirm that you will be permitted to self-isolate in your preferred accommodation before travelling.
    Face masks must be worn on public transportation. There is no general requirement to wear a face mask in public. Some shops and locations may restrict entry to those wearing face masks. Temperature checks are in operation in many locations.

    Read more
    13.07.2020
  • Taiwan
    *****International Restrictions:
    Foreign nationals are permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for tourism or to visit friends. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. Foreign nationals entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed within three working days prior to boarding their entry flight. The type of test required is a RT-PCR test. The certificate with the test result should be in English. You should confirm that the test you intend to take, and the certificate you will receive, meets the requirements set by the authorities in Taiwan.
    If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. The requirement to provide a negative COVID-19 test report does not apply to returning ARC and APRC holders. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC). If you are in Taiwan you can also contact the ‘Information
    Transit: New rules allowing transits are in place. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, are allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports are not be permitted to transit in Taiwan. Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.
    All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. In addition to completing a health declaration on arrival, you may be asked to install a local SIM card if you do not already have one. Mobile phone location monitoring will be used as part of the quarantine management process by local authorities. You will be required to provide temperature and health status updates to local authorities during self-isolation. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan. Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask. If you are granted permission to enter Taiwan, you may find it difficult to find a hotel that will accept travellers required to self-isolate. You should confirm with your hotel provider that they are able to offer accommodation to someone required to self-isolate for 14 days before you travel. Facemasks must be worn on public transportation.

    Read more
    06.07.2020
  • Taiwan Starting 25 June international air passengers will be allowed to transit through Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. Transits will be allowed only for connecting flights and for a maximum stopover time of eight hours. (Focus Taiwan, 24.06.2020)
    Taiwan is planning to reduce the quarantine period for visitors arriving on short-term business trips. Business travelers on two- or three-day trips, arriving from countries such as New Zealand, which are at extremely low risk for COVID-19, will be required to remain in quarantine for five days instead of two weeks. At the end of the five-day quarantine, the visitors will be tested for COVID-19 at their own expense and released once they test negative. Short-term business travelers from countries with relatively high risk of COVID-19 will be quarantined for 10 days, after which the procedure will be the same. Business people from countries where COVID-19 is not under control or who intend to stay longer than three days will be required to follow the current 14-day quarantine regulations. (Focus Taiwan, 20.05.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    From 29 June foreign nationals will be permitted to enter Taiwan provided they are not entering for tourism or to visit friends. You will need to apply for a visa before travelling. Foreign nationals entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed three days prior to boarding. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. The requirement to provide a negative COVID-19 test report also applies to returning ARC and APRC holders. For more information, you should visit the website of the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC) [https://www.cdc.gov.tw/En]. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed so may change at short notice.
    All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from. Travellers from the United Kingdom are required to complete the 14-day quarantine period.

    Transit: From 25 June, new rules allowing transits come into force. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, will be allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports will not be permitted to transit in Taiwan.Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan. Taxis and public transport systems are operating normally in Taiwan. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on all public transport. If you use public transport and are not wearing a face mask, you may be fined up to NT$15,000. Be aware that some taxi drivers may refuse to take a passenger who is not wearing a face mask. If you are granted permission to enter Taiwan, you may find it difficult to find a hotel that will accept travellers required to self-isolate. You should confirm with your hotel provider that they are able to offer accommodation to someone required to self-isolate for 14 days before you travel. Facemasks must be worn on public transportation.

    Read more
    02.07.2020
  • Taiwan Starting 25 June international air passengers will be allowed to transit through Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. Transits will be allowed only for connecting flights and for a maximum stopover time of eight hours. (Focus Taiwan, 24.06.2020)
    Taiwan is planning to reduce the quarantine period for visitors arriving on short-term business trips. Business travelers on two- or three-day trips, arriving from countries such as New Zealand, which are at extremely low risk for COVID-19, will be required to remain in quarantine for five days instead of two weeks. At the end of the five-day quarantine, the visitors will be tested for COVID-19 at their own expense and released once they test negative. Short-term business travelers from countries with relatively high risk of COVID-19 will be quarantined for 10 days, after which the procedure will be the same. Business people from countries where COVID-19 is not under control or who intend to stay longer than three days will be required to follow the current 14-day quarantine regulations. (Focus Taiwan, 20.05.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    From 29 June foreign nationals will be permitted to enter Taiwan provided it is for business. Foreign travellers entering Taiwan must provide a negative COVID-19 test report completed three days prior to boarding. There are currently no visa waivers for visitors to Taiwan. Before you travel you should apply for a visa to enter Taiwan. This can be done at the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. If you already hold a valid Alien Resident Certificate (ARC) or Alien Permanent Resident Certificate (APRC), you do not require a visa to enter Taiwan. You may be required to provide a negative COVID-19 test report. For more information, you should visit the website of the Bureau of Consular Affairs (BOCA) or contact the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country from which you plan to travel. If you are unsure if you are permitted to enter Taiwan, or you have further questions about entry restrictions and conditions, you should contact your local Taipei Representative Office (TRO)or airline before you attempt to travel. Entry procedures are being regularly reviewed so may change at short notice.
    All airline passengers entering Taiwan are required to fill in a health declaration which includes travel history for the preceding 14 days. On arrival in Taiwan you are legally required to self-isolate for 14 days. Local authorities monitor those self-isolating, and there are financial penalties for anyone breaching the law. Travellers from countries and territories that are designated as low risk by the local authorities may be permitted to self-isolate for a period less than 14 days. You should check the current regulations before you travel with the Taipei Representative Office (TRO) in the country you plan to travel from. Travellers from the United Kingdom are required to complete the 14-day quarantine period.
    Transit: From 25 June, new rules allowing transits come into force. Foreign passengers, including people from Hong Kong and Macau, will be allowed to transit through Taoyuan International Airport. Holders of People’s Republic of China (PRC) passports will not be permitted to transit in Taiwan.
    Those transiting will need to board connecting flights of the same airline company they fly in on. Transits must last less than 8 hours. Transit passengers, who need to wait for more than one hour, will remain separate from other passengers and stay in a separate area. Rules and procedures may change at short notice. Not all airlines are permitted to transit through Taiwan. For further information, you should contact your airline or travel provider.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    There are no domestic travel restrictions in Taiwan. Facemasks must be worn on public transportation.

    Read more
    28.06.2020
  • Taiwan From June 29, 2020, foreign nationals who wish to travel to Taiwan for reasons other than tourism and regular social visits may apply for a special entry permit with an R.O.C. overseas mission by submitting relevant documents and forms. Applications by students and people wishing to study Mandarin in Taiwan will be handled by the Ministry of Education in line with its related measures.

    Upon entering Taiwan, all foreign nationals must present an English-language certificate of a negative COVID-19 test taken within three days of boarding the flight to Taiwan and undergo a 14-day home quarantine period. Visitors of the following categories can be exempted from negative COVID-19 test:personnel on diplomatic or official business, migrant workers, and students (whose entry is managed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Labor, and Ministry of Education and who represent manageable risk levels), as well as people coming to Taiwan for emergency situations and crewmembers on vessels arriving in Taiwan (for whom it may be difficult to obtain a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test).

    These newly announced regulations constitute updates of measures that were announced earlier this year by MOFA, according to which foreign nationals—except Alien Resident Certificate holders, personnel on diplomatic or official business, persons who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, and persons requiring special permission—were barred from entering Taiwan from March 19 in accordance with guidance from the CECC. (E)

    Read more
    24.06.2020
  • Taiwan Taiwan is planning to reduce the quarantine period for visitors arriving on short-term business trips. Business travelers on two- or three-day trips, arriving from countries such as New Zealand, which are at extremely low risk for COVID-19, will be required to remain in quarantine for five days instead of two weeks. At the end of the five-day quarantine, the visitors will be tested for COVID-19 at their own expense and released once they test negative. Short-term business travelers from countries with relatively high risk of COVID-19 will be quarantined for 10 days, after which the procedure will be the same. Business people from countries where COVID-19 is not under control or who intend to stay longer than three days will be required to follow the current 14-day quarantine regulations. (Focus Taiwan, 20.05.2020) 1. Passengers are not allowed to transit Chinese Taipei. (Taiwan) 2. Passengers are not allowed to enter Chinese Taipei. – This does not apply to passengers with a Chinese Taipei travel document. – This does not apply to passengers with an Alien Resident Certificate. – This does not apply to personnel on diplomatic or official business. – This does not apply to passengers who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, or passengers requiring special permission. – This does not apply to passengers with a visa with “SPECIAL ENTRY PERMIT FOR COVID-19 OUTBREAK” stated on remarks. 3. Passengers allowed to enter must observe a 14-day home quarantine upon arrival. 4. All arriving passengers and crew members must present a completed Health Declaration Form. All foreign nationals are denied entry into Chinese Taipei. Exceptions include Republic of China (ROC) citizens, diplomatic staff, permanent residents (APRC), Alien Residency Certificate (ARC) holders and business people with special permits. Travellers will not be allowed to transit through Chinese Taipei until further notice. Travellers permitted to enter Chinese Taipei will be subject to mandatory 14-day home quarantine. Inbound travellers allowed to enter Taiwan that have had travel history in the past 14 days to Southeast Asia, America or Europe will need to complete the COVID-19 Health Declaration and Home Quarantine Notice and confirm if their residence satisfies the home quarantine requirements before boarding. Travellers living with people who are 65 years old or older, children 6 years old or under, persons with chronic disease (such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or lung disease), or persons who don’t have a separate room (including a separate bathroom) will be required to live in quarantine hotels upon arrival. From 8 May, Taiwanese people who have not left Hubei province may return to Chinese Taipei but will need to undergo a 14-day period of quarantine in a designated facility.

    Internal restrictions:

    Social distancing rules are in place. Wearing of masks is mandatory on public transportation such a MRT and buses.

    Read more
    27.05.2020
  • Taiwan Taiwan is planning to reduce the quarantine period for visitors arriving on short-term business trips. Business travelers on two- or three-day trips, arriving from countries such as New Zealand, which are at extremely low risk for COVID-19, will be required to remain in quarantine for five days instead of two weeks. At the end of the five-day quarantine, the visitors will be tested for COVID-19 at their own expense and released once they test negative. Short-term business travelers from countries with relatively high risk of COVID-19 will be quarantined for 10 days, after which the procedure will be the same. Business people from countries where COVID-19 is not under control or who intend to stay longer than three days will be required to follow the current 14-day quarantine regulations. (Focus Taiwan, 20.05.2020) 1. Passengers are not allowed to transit Chinese Taipei. (Taiwan) 2. Passengers are not allowed to enter Chinese Taipei. – This does not apply to passengers with a Chinese Taipei travel document. – This does not apply to passengers with an Alien Resident Certificate. – This does not apply to personnel on diplomatic or official business. – This does not apply to passengers who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, or passengers requiring special permission. – This does not apply to passengers with a visa with “SPECIAL ENTRY PERMIT FOR COVID-19 OUTBREAK” stated on remarks. 3. Passengers allowed to enter must observe a 14-day home quarantine upon arrival. 4. All arriving passengers and crew members must present a completed Health Declaration Form. All foreign nationals are denied entry into Chinese Taipei. Exceptions include Republic of China (ROC) citizens, diplomatic staff, permanent residents (APRC), Alien Residency Certificate (ARC) holders and business people with special permits. Travellers will not be allowed to transit through Chinese Taipei until further notice. Travellers permitted to enter Chinese Taipei will be subject to mandatory 14-day home quarantine. Inbound travellers allowed to enter Taiwan that have had travel history in the past 14 days to Southeast Asia, America or Europe will need to complete the COVID-19 Health Declaration and Home Quarantine Notice and confirm if their residence satisfies the home quarantine requirements before boarding. Travellers living with people who are 65 years old or older, children 6 years old or under, persons with chronic disease (such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or lung disease), or persons who don’t have a separate room (including a separate bathroom) will be required to live in quarantine hotels upon arrival. From 8 May, Taiwanese people who have not left Hubei province may return to Chinese Taipei but will need to undergo a 14-day period of quarantine in a designated facility. Passengers traveling on regular or high-speed rail must wear a mask.

    Read more
    21.05.2020
  • Taiwan 1. Passengers are not allowed to transit Chinese Taipei. (Taiwan)
    2. Passengers are not allowed to enter Chinese Taipei.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a Chinese Taipei travel document.
    – This does not apply to passengers with an Alien Resident Certificate.
    – This does not apply to personnel on diplomatic or official business.
    – This does not apply to passengers who can prove they are fulfilling commercial and contractual obligations, or passengers requiring special permission.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa with “SPECIAL ENTRY PERMIT FOR COVID-19 OUTBREAK” stated on remarks.
    3. Passengers allowed to enter must observe a 14-day home quarantine upon arrival.
    4. All arriving passengers and crew members must present a completed Health Declaration Form.

    All foreign nationals are denied entry into Chinese Taipei. Exceptions include Republic of China (ROC) citizens, diplomatic staff, permanent residents (APRC), Alien Residency Certificate (ARC) holders and business people with special permits. Travellers will not be allowed to transit through Chinese Taipei until further notice. Travellers permitted to enter Chinese Taipei will be subject to mandatory 14-day home quarantine. Inbound travellers allowed to enter Taiwan that have had travel history in the past 14 days to Southeast Asia, America or Europe will need to complete the COVID-19 Health Declaration and Home Quarantine Notice and confirm if their residence satisfies the home quarantine requirements before boarding. Travellers living with people who are 65 years old or older, children 6 years old or under, persons with chronic disease (such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or lung disease), or persons who don’t have a separate room (including a separate bathroom) will be required to live in quarantine hotels upon arrival. From 8 May, Taiwanese people who have not left Hubei province may return to Chinese Taipei but will need to undergo a 14-day period of quarantine in a designated facility.

    Read more
    10.05.2020
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    Taiwan Information Office/
    OSAC Travel Advisories/
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