De En
Gesamtdosen
gegeben
11M
Menschen vollständig
geimpft
4.1M
% vollständig
geimpft
81.25%
Masken
Nicht benötigt
COVID-19 test
Nicht benötigt
Quarantäne
Nicht benötigt
Passenger Locator Form
Nicht benötigt
Gesundheitsformular
Nicht benötigt
Impfung
Nicht benötigt
Visa
Visa not required for 31 countries
Erlaubnis
Nicht benötigt
Pre-travel testing (vaccinated):
Pre-travel testing (unvaccinated):
Test on arrival (vaccinated):
Test on arrival (unvaccinated):

Neueste Nachrichten:

26.05.2021

Latest News: Irish government may permit restriction-free travel for vaccinated U.S. nationals by mid-June (Schengen Visa Info, 20.05.2021). Travel restrictions eased; hotels will be allowed to reopen on 2 June (Dublin Live, 10.05.2021). Irish government removes Austria and Italy from hotel quarantine list (Reuters, 08.05.2021). Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021).

International Restrictions:

*From within the EU:

Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU "traffic lights" approach to travel restrictions.

Is a coronavirus test required?

All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to undertake Mandatory Hotel Quarantine and pre-book a place in the designated facility prior to arrival to Ireland. Passengers will be required to present evidence of this booking to their flight or ferry operator in order to board the aeroplane or ferry to Ireland.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test.

If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic


Documents you need to travel in Europe

Health cover for temporary stays *Transit:

As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

*From Third Countries:

Is a coronavirus test required?

Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or 'not detected' result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

In case of lack of a negative or 'not detected' RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

Is a quarantine required?

All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

If you come into Ireland from any country deemed 'high risk', or If you come to Ireland without a negative or 'not detected' PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed 'high risk', you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or 'not detected' PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or 'not detected', your period of quarantine can end.

If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

Passenger Locator Form

All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

Find out more:
gov.ie - Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

Internal Restrictions:

*Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website. For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:

• Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)

• Construction

• Exercise & sporting events

• Funerals

• Hotels & accommodation

• Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions

• Organised indoor gatherings

• Organised outdoor gatherings

• Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks

• Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness

• Religious services

• Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)

• Schools and higher and adult education

• Social & family gatherings

• Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people

• Transport

• Travel restrictions

• Visiting long-term residential care facilities

• Weddings

• Wet pubs

• Work

*Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

21.10.2020

Other: open/confirmed

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD