En De
Total doses
given
805.5K
People fully
vaccinated
290.2K
% Fully
vaccinated
78.36%
Pre-travel testing (vaccinated): None
Pre-travel testing (unvaccinated): None
Test on arrival (vaccinated): None
Test on arrival (unvaccinated): None

Movement Restrictions:

06.04.2022

17/03/20: Entry ban for individuals other than citizens from countries in the European Union; European Economic Area; and United Kingdom; long-term residents and people with long-term visa or residence permits; family members of EU and EEA citizens; medical personnel and people responsible for transport of goods.; 1/03/2022: The European Union recommends that its member nations remove any non-essential travel bans for vaccinated tourists arriving from third countries starting March 1; 2022.

17.03.2022

16/07/20: Travellers from Denmark; Norway; Finland and Germany are added to the list with the Faroe Islands and Greenland and; are exempted from COVID-19 testing and quarantine requirements.; 18/02/2021: Exemption for people from third countries; i.e. outside the EEA/EFTA area; who have valid certificates issued for unnecessary cross-border travel and is due to enter into force on 26 March. Later postponed to 6 April.; 25/02/2022: all restrictions have now ended.

07.03.2022

Iceland has implemented the travel restrictions imposed for the Schengen Area and the EU - foreign nationals; except EU/EEA; EFTA or UK nationals; are not allowed to enter Iceland. All foreign nationals with immigration status in Iceland or another Schengen State; or those who have family members in the same countries; are allowed to enter Iceland. Furthermore; the travel restrictions do not apply to essential travel; including passengers in transit; health and care workers on professional travel; transportation crews (airlines and freighters); individual requiring international protection; individuals travelling because of acute family incidents and diplomats; international organizations staff; members of armed forces travelling to Iceland for duty; or humanitarian aid workers. Normal travel requirements apply.; 20/03/2020: The Minister has announced that travel restrictions will be extended to 15 May. The scope of the restrictions is unchanged and foreigners who are neither EEA nor EFTA nationals will continue to be prohibited from entering the country unless they can demonstrate that their travel is due to urgent matters.; 15/05/2020 Residents of twelve non-EEA and Schengen states allowed to visit Iceland. The states are Algeria; Australia; Canada; Georgia; Japan; Morocco; New Zealand; Rwanda; South Korea; Thailand; Tunisia; and Uruguay.; 16/07/20: Travellers from Denmark; Norway; Finland and Germany are added to the list with the Faroe Islands and Greenland and; are exempted from COVID-19 testing and quarantine requirements.;

02.03.2022

27/11/21 The Chief Epidemiologist for Iceland recommends that residents of Iceland avoid unnecessary travel to certain African countries (Botswana; Eswatini; Lesotho; Mozambique; Namibia; South Africa; Zimbabwe) and advises unvaccinated residents of Iceland against travel to COVID-19 risk areas unless strictly necessary. 25/02/2022 All public restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic will be lifted; both domestically and at the border.;

02.03.2022

27/07/2021 All vaccinated persons and those that can present a certificate of a prior COVID-19 infection must present a negative PCR or antigen (rapid) test that is no more than 72 hours old before departure to Iceland. Unvaccinated individuals will continue to be required to present negative PCR test results no more than 72 hours old and undergo double PCR screening with a five-day quarantine in between.;16/08/2021 Vaccinated passengers with ties to Iceland must undergo PCR/Rapid testing within 48 hours of arrival in Iceland.; 25/02/2022 All public restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic will be lifted; both domestically and at the border.; 01/10/2021 Passengers with ties to Iceland will no longer need to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test at the border; but will be required to undergo testing upon arrival; regardless of their vaccination status. Vaccinated passengers with no ties to Iceland will continue to be required to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test outcome that is no older than 72 hours; instead of undergoing testing upon arrival.; 27/11/2021 Travellers with ties to Iceland need to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test but if fully vaccinated (or with a certificate of previous infection or antibodies) they need to undergo a COVID-19 test within two days of arrival. Travellers without ties to Iceland: Need to present a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test; that is no older than 72 hours at boarding. Travellers who are not fully vaccinated (or with a certificate of previous infection or antibodies) need to undergo a PCR test on arrival and a quarantine that is lifted with a second test 5 days later.; 04/01/2022 At a government meeting; it was decided to extend the unchanged regulation on disease control measures at the border due to COVID -19 to 28 February next. Specifically passengers to undergo a negative PCR test before loading and all passengers arriving in the country to go to PCR test at the border.;

29.06.2021

On 25 January 2021; Iceland announced the introduction of COVID-19 Digital vaccine certificates. Those presenting such a certificate are exempt from official border restrictions and are therefore not obliged to undergo a screening. From 18 March 2021; the exemption from border measures for vaccinated individuals is extended to non-Schengen countries. Iceland has announced that from 1 May it will use the ECDC risk assessment colour code at the border. From that time travellers from low-risk areas (green and yellow) will be exempt from quarantine measures if they present a negative PCR result at the border. Since 16 February; a negative PCR test is required prior to departure when travelling to Iceland. Additionally; a PCR test is mandatory at the border followed by a five-day quarantine and a second test. Vaccinated individuals and those with prior infection are exempt from the measures. Travel to Iceland from outside the EEA/Schengen area is still restricted. However; on March 26 a government regulation will come into effect that allows non-essential travels to Iceland from outside the EEA/Schengen-area for passengers who can provide valid proof of vaccination or prior infection; in addition to those on essential business. Between 1 and 30 April; border measures will also apply to children; who have previously been exempt from such measures. Changes will take effect on 1 April and will affect children and those traveling from areas that are classified as dark red or grey by the ECDC (where the 14-day incidence rate exceeds 500 or insufficient data is available). Children will be tested and required to quarantine (some exceptions exist). Passengers who submit a vaccination certificate or a certificate of a prior infection will be required to undergo one test upon arrival to the country. The Minister of Health has decided to retain the current measures to contain the spread of infections at the borders until 1 July. After that time; the measures will be relaxed by cease the screening of those who present a certificate of vaccination or prior infection with COVID-19. Additionally; children will no longer be screened for COVID-19 upon arrival in Iceland.

31.05.2021

The Minister of Health has decided; based on the recommendations of the Chief Epidemiologist; that Icelandic citizens and residents of Iceland who choose to be tested upon arrival will have to take special precautions during the first five days after arrival in Iceland until they can be tested for the second time for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. During the first five days after arrival in Iceland; Icelanders and residents in Iceland should: - not attend gatherings of more than ten people; - avoid close contact with individuals that are at risk of severe illness or otherwise vulnerable to the disease; - maintain a distance of two meters when interacting with others; - avoid handshakes and hugs; - practice good personal hygiene such as thorough handwashing.

31.05.2021

Icelanders advised not to travel abroad. Note that airports will remain open and flights will continue. There are no restrictions in place for travelling to Icceland and no restrictions for tourists; as they are not likely to come into contact with vulnerable groups.

31.05.2021

Chief Epidemiologist recommends that travelers avoid unnecessary trips to China.

30.03.2021

The Icelandic government announced that no later than June 15; its goal is to give tourists and Icelanders arriving in the country three choices: - staying in quarantine for 14 days; - being screened for the novel coronavirus at Keflavík International Airport; - or presenting a certificate of recent screening; approved by Icelandic health authorities. From Friday April 24th; international arrivals to Iceland must be quarantined for 14 days from their day of arrival and temporary internal Schengen border controls will be introduced on the same day. Bearing any changes in the medical and scientific advice; these rules will remain in place until at least May 15th. In order to enforce the amended quarantine rules; temporary border controls for arrivals from the Schengen area have been established in accordance with the Immigration Act and the regulation on cross-border travel. Denmark; Norway; Finland and Germany removed from the list of high-risk countries and will be exempt from the quarantine and screening requirements (from July 14 2020). On October 7th it was announced that the current procedure of double screening for covid-19 at the border for all passengers arriving in Iceland is planned to remain in place until 1 December; unless circumstances warrant earlier easing. The double border-screening procedure requires all passengers arriving in Iceland to undergo two PCR-tests: one upon arrival and another 5-6 days later to minimize the risk of a false negative causing infection to spread in the community. On November 18th the Minister of Health has decided that testing of travellers for COVID-19 at Iceland’s borders is to be free of charge; on a temporary basis; from 1 December 2020 until 31 January 2021. As of January 15th; all passengers must undergo a PCR test upon arrival in Iceland; followed by a 5–6-day quarantine and a second screening at the end of quarantine period. This procedure will remain in place until 1 May. New border measures came into force on February 19th which requires all arriving passengers in Iceland to present a negative PCR taken within 72 hours of their time of departure to Iceland. Other measures; such as double screening for all arrivals; remain in place

06.11.2020

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 31 October 2020 to 17 November 2020

The Minister of Health has approved proposals regarding tighter measures to combat the Covid-19 pandemic, which took effect on 31 October 2020 until 17 November (including that date); they will be reviewed in the light of developments with a view to whether it will be possible to relax them earlier or necessary to extend the period for a longer period. The same rules will apply throughout Iceland. Face-masks must be worn where it is not possible to ensure a 2-metre social distance between persons who are not members of the same household. Children born in or after 2015 are exempt from the 2-metre social distance rule, the restrictions on the size of gatherings and the face-mask requirement. (These exemptions applied previously to children born in or after 2005.). UPDATE 7 October: the Minister of Health has accepted the recommendations of the Chief Epidemiologist for stricter limits on the size of gatherings in the metropolitan area. These take effect on 7 October 2020. The restrictions announced on 5 October remain unchanged in other parts of the country. The restrictions announced here will remain in force until 19 October. The metropolitan area includes: Reykjavík, Seltjarnarnesbær, Mosfellsbær, Kjósarhreppur, Hafnarfjarðarkaupstaður, Garðabær and Kópavogur. The following was decided for the metropolitan areas: Social distance of 2 metres - People not closely related or connected are required to maintain a social distance of 2 metres. This also applies in all schools, though not to pupils born in or after 2005. UPDATE October: general social distancing. At gatherings, in all workplaces and in all other operations, social distancing of at least 1 metre must be kept between parties who are not closely linked. Facemasks covering the mouth and nose must be used in operations where the 1-metre distance rule between persons cannot be followed. This applies to e.g. healthcare services, hair salons and massage parlours, in domestic flights and passenger ferries, in taxis and coaches as well as in public transport. UPDATE September: the Minister of Health, Svandís Svavarsdóttir, has accepted a proposal from the Chief Epidemiologist to enable people to complete quarantine in connection with COVID-19 in 7 days if a test at the end of that time proves negative. On completing quarantine, people will still be required to observe precautions against infection and to avoid contact with vulnerable individuals. Testing arrangements will be organised by the Chief Epidemiologist and will be free of charge to those tested. The new arrangement applies to infection precautions within Iceland, not to persons arriving at the border. UPDATE August: ‍current restrictions in effect during ban on gatherings are valid as of 14 August 2020 (00.00) until 27 August 2020 (23.59). The Icelandic government reassesses the need for the restriction on a regular basis, ie. whether it can be lifted earlier than planned or whether it is necessary to extend its period of validity. The restrictions apply to the country as a whole. - SOCIAL DISTANCING: the two-meter social distancing rule between individuals who do not live together apply in all gatherings. This applies to all businesses, workplaces, and public establishments. Where the 2-meter rule cannot be respected masks should be used, such as on domestic flights and in ferries, in hair salons, massage parlours and other personal service establishments. It is important to follow the instructions on the use of face masks. Colleges and universities are allowed to maintain one-meter social distance between individuals without face masks. Contact between athletes are allowed during training and competitions. However, the two-meter rule must be respected in changing rooms and other areas outside competition and training. Others, including coaches, staff, and volunteers, must always respect the two-meter principle. Nursing homes, other health care institutions, and other similar agencies are required to set rules for their activities, e.g. regarding external visits to care homes and other institutions. UPDATE July: renewed restrictions because of the COVID-19 pandemic will be put in place on Friday 31 July, the Minister of Health has decided based on the recommendations by the Chief Epidemiologist. These measures are taken in response to at least two clusters of infections that have been identified in the past few days, one of which has not been traced to a definite source. - New clusters of domestic infections are being investigated - Gathering limit set at 100 individuals - Continued emphasis on personal hygienic measures and individual responsibility The new restrictions reimpose a 100-person limit of larger gatherings and reinstate the 2-meter social distancing rule. This applies to all businesses, workplaces, and public establishments. Where the 2-meter rule cannot be respected masks should be used, such as on domestic flights and ferries, in hair salons, massage parlours and other personal service establishments. All businesses and establishments open to the public must provide hand sanitizers, regularly clean, and disinfect the premises and equipment. Museums, clubs, and other establishments open to the public, where the 2-meter rule cannot be maintained, should temporarily halt their operations. Bars and restaurants must close by 11 PM as before.

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 31 October 2020 to 17 November 2020

The Minister of Health has approved proposals regarding tighter measures to combat the Covid-19 pandemic, which took effect on 31 October 2020 until 17 November (including that date); they will be reviewed in the light of developments with a view to whether it will be possible to relax them earlier or necessary to extend the period for a longer period. The same rules will apply throughout Iceland. Iceland's borders have remained open to other EU and Schengen states throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, but Iceland continues to implement the travel restrictions imposed for the Schengen Area, which are currently in place. All passengers are required to fill out a pre-registration form, follow hygiene measures and they are encouraged to download and use the COVID-19 app Rakning C-19 before entering Iceland. The pre-registration form is not a travel authorization form. Passengers arriving in Iceland on and after 19 August 2020 may choose either to submit to two screening tests for COVID-19, separated by five days’ quarantine until the results of the second test are known, or else not to undergo border screening but instead to spend 14 days in quarantine after arrival. Children born in or after 2005 are exempt from the screening and quarantine requirements, and the same exemption applies to persons who have been certified by the Icelandic health authorities, following a PCR test, as having previously been infected with COVID-19 and have completed a period of isolation, or if they have been shown by antibody measurements to have recovered from COVID-19. Transit passsengers who do not leave the terminal facilities at the border are not required to undergo screening or quarantine.

02.06.2020

The Icelandic government announced that no later than June 15; its goal is to give tourists and Icelanders arriving in the country three choices: - staying in quarantine for 14 days; - being screened for the novel coronavirus at Keflavík International Airport; - or presenting a certificate of recent screening; approved by Icelandic health authorities. From Friday April 24th; international arrivals to Iceland must be quarantined for 14 days from their day of arrival and temporary internal Schengen border controls will be introduced on the same day. Barring any changes in the medical and scientific advice; these rules will remain in place until at least May 15th. In order to enforce the amended quarantine rules; temporary border controls for arrivals from the Schengen area have been established in accordance with the Immigration Act and the regulation on cross-border travel.