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Airlines Updates

Published on 09.11.2020
Lufthansa suspends Flights to Sarajevo until 2021 Summer Season

Published on 28.10.2020
Lufthansa resumes weekly flights between Maldvies, Germany

Published on 27.10.2020
Lufthansa resumes flights between Munich and Zagreb

Published on 24.10.2020
Eurowings resumes flights to the Canary Islands

22.10.2020 Eurowings in the first quarter of 2021 schedules additional new routes, mainly focusing on Spain and Cyprus. Planned operation as follows.

Cologne – Malaga eff 18MAR21 2 weekly A320 (A319 from 28MAR21)
Dusseldorf – Larnaca eff 13FEB21 1 weekly A320 (A319 from 03APR21)
Hamburg – Malaga eff 27FEB21 2 weekly A320 (A319 from 28MAR21)
Hamburg – Valencia eff 17MAR21 2 weekly A320 (3 weekly A319 from 30MAR21)

Published on 21.10.2020
Lufthansa resumes Shenyang / Beijing service in late-Oct 2020
India-Germany flights resume after 3 weeks
Lufthansa from late-October 2020 plans to resume service to Shenyang and Beijing, initially operating Frankfurt – Shenyang – Beijing Capital – Frankfurt triangle routing, from 27OCT20. Airbus A340-300 aircraft to operate this route once weekly.

LH720 FRA1650 – 1000+1SHE 343 2
LH721 SHE0740 – 0930PEK1120 – 1525FRA 343 4

On LH721, the airline does not have passenger traffic rights originating from Shenyang. As of 20OCT20, Lufthansa maintains its plan to resume nonstop Frankfurt – Beijing Capital route twice weekly from December 2020.

Lufthansa at the launch of winter 2020/21 season is expanding codeshare partnership with SunExpress, as additional 4 routes operated by the latter will begin displaying Lufthansa’s LH-coded flight numbers from 25OCT20. Planned new codeshare routes include the following.

Lufthansa operated by SunExpress
Frankfurt – Ankara
Frankfurt – Antalya
Frankfurt – Izmir
Munich – Antalya

Published on 16.10.2020
Lufthansa schedules final Berlin Tegel flight with A350 on 07NOV20
Russia and Germany announce resumption of flights to Cuba

Lufthansa earlier this month filed changes to its Intercontinental network for Northern winter 2020/21 season. As the airline already filed additional adjustment for the month of November, the following planned operation focuses on 01DEC20 – 27MAR21, as of 13OCT20.

Additional changes remain possible.

Frankfurt – Abuja – Port Harcourt 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Addis Ababa Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Almaty Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Atlanta eff 01MAR21 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Austin Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Baku Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Bangalore A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Bangkok Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 747-8I operating
Frankfurt – Beijing Capital Reduce from 6-7 to 3 weekly, A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Beirut Reduce from 6-7 to 3 weekly, A321neo
Frankfurt – Bogota eff 03DEC20 Reduce from 5-7 to 3 weekly, A340-300 replaces -600
Frankfurt – Boston Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A330-300 replaces 747-400 (7 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – Buenos Aires Ezeiza Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, 747-8I operating
Frankfurt – Cairo Reduce from 10 to 7 weekly, A321neo
Frankfurt – Cancun 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Cape Town Reduce from 5 to 3 weekly, A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Casablanca Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Chennai Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare Reduce from 2 to 1 daily, A350-900XWB replaces 747-8I
Frankfurt – Dallas/Ft. Worth Reduce from 6-7 to 3 weekly, A330-300/340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Dammam – Bahrain 2 weekly A330-300 until 27DEC20
Frankfurt – Delhi A340-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Denver Service cancelled in NW20 (Previous plan: A330-300 replaces 747-400)
Frankfurt – Detroit eff 02DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Dubai A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Erbil Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Hong Kong Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A340-300 replaces 747-8I
Frankfurt – Houston A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Johannesburg Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 747-8I operating
Frankfurt – Kuwait City – Bahrain 2 weekly A330-300 (until 29DEC20)
Frankfurt – Kuwait City – Dammam eff 02JAN21 Routing resumes, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Lagos – Malabo Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Los Angeles Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A350-900XWB replaces 747-8I
Frankfurt – Luanda Reduce from 3 to 2 weekly, A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Male 2 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Mexico City Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 747-8I operating (7 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – Miami A340-300 replaces 747-400, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly
Frankfurt – Mumbai A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Nagoya Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Nairobi 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Nanjing Reduce from 3 to 1 weekly, A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Newark A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – New York JFK Reduce from 2 daily to 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01MAR21), A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Nur-Sultan – Almaty Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Orlando eff 01DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A340-300 replaces 747-400
Frankfurt – Panama City Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Philadelphia eff 02DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 5-7 to 3 weekly, A330-300 operating (5 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – Qingdao Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Rio de Janeiro Galeao Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Riyadh 3 weekly A330-300 until 28DEC20
Frankfurt – Riyadh – Bahrain eff 02JAN21 Routing resumes, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly. A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – San Diego Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – San Francisco A340-300 replaces -600, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly (5 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – San Jose (Costa Rica) Reduce from 3 to 2 weekly, A340-300 operating
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 747-8I
Frankfurt – Seattle Reduce from 5 to 3 weekly, A330-300 operating
Frankfurt – Seoul Incheon eff 02MAR21 Service resumption, A340-300 replaces 747-400, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong Reduce from 7 to 2 weekly, 747-8I operating (3 weekly from 06MAR21)
Frankfurt – Shenyang Service cancelled in NW20
Frankfurt – Singapore A340-300 replaces 747-8I, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly (7 weekly from 28FEB21)
Frankfurt – Tampa eff 02MAR21 Service resumption, reduce from 6 to 3 weekly. A330-300 replaces A340-300
Frankfurt – Tehran Imam Khomeini eff 14DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A340-300 operating (5 weekly from 02FEB21, 7 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – Tel Aviv Reduce from 3 to 1 daily, A321neo
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda A350-900XWB replaces 747-8I, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01MAR21. A350 operates from 02DEC20; Previous plan: A340-300)
Frankfurt – Toronto A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Vancouver A330-300 replaces 747-400, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01MAR21)
Frankfurt – Washington Dulles A330-300 replaces 747-400, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01MAR21)
Munich – Bangalore Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Beijing Capital eff 01MAR21 Service resumption, reduce from 5 to 2 weekly. A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Cape Town eff 13DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 5-6 to 3-4 weekly. A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Charlotte Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Chicago O’Hare Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A350-900XWB operating (3 weekly 18NOV20 – 02DEC20)
Munich – Delhi 1 daily A350-900XWB
Munich – Hong Kong Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Los Angeles Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Mexico City Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Miami Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Montreal Reduce from 5 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating (5 weekly from 01MAR21)
Munich – Mumbai Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Newark Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, A350-900XWB operating
Munich – New York JFK Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Osaka Kansai eff 01DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A350-900XWB operating
Munich – San Francisco eff 01MAR21 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly. A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Sao Paulo Guarulhos Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Shanghai Pu Dong Reduce from 7 to 2 weekly, A350-900XWB operating (3 weekly from 02MAR21)
Munich – Singapore Service cancelled in NW20
Munich – Tel Aviv eff 15DEC20 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 3 weekly. A320 operating
Munich – Tokyo Haneda eff 01MAR21 Service resumption, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly. A350-900XWB operating
Munich – Washington Dulles Service cancelled in NW20

Lufthansa earlier this month adjusted planned Intercontinental network for November 2020. As of 13OCT20, planned operation as follows. Travel restrictions may continue to impact the airline’s passenger traffic rights on selected routes, in certain direction.

Additional changes remain possible.

Frankfurt – Abuja – Port Harcourt 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Bangkok 3 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Beijing Capital 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Beirut 3 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Boston 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 3 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Cairo 1 daily A321neo
Frankfurt – Cancun 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Cape Town 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Chennai 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily A350-900XWB
Frankfurt – Dammam – Bahrain 2 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Delhi 5 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Dubai 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Hong Kong 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Houston 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Johannesburg 3 weekly 747-8I (5 weekly from 18NOV20)
Frankfurt – Kuwait City – Bahrain 2 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Lagos – Malabo 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Los Angeles 5 weekly A350-900XWB
Frankfurt – Luanda 2 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Male 2 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Mexico City 5 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Miami 5 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Mumbai 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Nairobi 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Nanjing 1 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Newark 1 daily A330-300
Frankfurt – New York JFK 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Riyadh 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – San Francisco 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – San Jose (Costa Rica) 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 5 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Seattle 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Singapore 1 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Tel Aviv 1 daily A321neo
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Toronto 1 daily A330-300/340-300
Frankfurt – Tunis 3 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Vancouver 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Washington Dulles 5 weekly A330-300
Munich – Chicago O’Hare 5 weekly A350-900XWB (3 weekly from 18NOV20)
Munich – Delhi 5 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Denver 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Los Angeles 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Newark 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Seoul Incheon 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly A350-900XWB

Published on 14.10.2020
Lufthansa Nov 2020 Intercontinental network as of 13OCT19

12.10.2020 Condor during the month of November 2020 schedules following short-haul network, majority operated by Airbus A320 aircraft. Following operation is based on information as of 09OCT20, further changes remain highly possible.

Dusseldorf – Fuerteventura 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Irakleion 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Kalamata 1 weekly
Dusseldorf – Santa Cruz de la Palma 1 weekly
Dusseldorf – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Fuerteventura 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Irakleion 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Lanzarote 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Larnaca 1 weekly A321 (until 07NOV20)
Frankfurt – Santa Cruz de la Palma 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Hamburg – Fuerteventura 3 weekly
Hamburg – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 3 weekly
Hamburg – Lanzarote 1 weekly
Hamburg – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Leipzig – Fuerteventura 1 weekly
Leipzig – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Leipzig – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Munich – Fuerteventura 1 weekly (until 07NOV20)
Munich – Irakleion 2 weekly (selected dates 757)
Munich – Kalamata 1 weekly
Munich – Kos 1 weekly (until 08NOV20)
Munich – Rhodes 1 weekly (until 08NOV20)

Condor in Northern winter 2020/21 season once again resumes long-haul service, initially serving Varadero in Cuba, on board Boeing 767-300ER aircraft. Planned operation includes the following.

Dusseldorf – Varadero eff 03NOV20 3 weekly
DE2204 DUS1245 – 1750VRA 76W 256
DE2205 VRA2350 – 1455+1DUS 76W 256

Frankfurt – Varadero eff 31OCT20 3 weekly
DE2198 FRA1200 – 1720VRA 76W 256
DE2199 VRA1920 – 1100+1FRA 76W 256

Eurowings last week opened reservation for its planned new service to The Middle East. Previously reported on Airlineroute, the airline plans to offer service to Beirut and Erbil. Service launch has been moved forward to late-December 2020, upon the opening of ticket sales. Revised operation as follows.

Berlin – Beirut eff 19DEC20 2 weekly A320
EW8980 BER0825 – 1325BEY 320 2
EW8980 BER1205 – 1705BEY 320 6

EW8981 BEY1430 – 1745BER 320 2
EW8981 BEY1815 – 2130BER 320 6

Dusseldorf – Beirut eff 22DEC20 1 weekly A319 (2 weekly A320 from 02JAN21)
EW9980 DUS1130 – 1645BEY 320 2
EW9980 DUS1205 – 1720BEY 320 6

EW9981 BEY1800 – 2150DUS 320 2
EW9981 BEY1835 – 2225DUS 320 6

Dusseldorf – Erbil eff 19DEC20 1 weekly A319 (2 weekly A320 from 12JAN21)
EW9978 DUS0730 – 1415EBL 320 26
EW9979 EBL1515 – 1825DUS 320 26

Stuttgart – Beirut eff 02FEB21 1 weekly A320
EW2980 STR1015 – 1500BEY 32A 2
EW2981 BEY1600 – 1925STR 32A 2

Published on 06.10.2020
Lufthansa will resume flights between Frankfurt and Buenos Aires from 25 October

Published on 29.09.2020
Lufthansa cancels all India flights from 30 September 30 to 20 October

Published on 28.09.2020
Eurowings/Lufthansa closes Munich – Bangkok W20 reservations as of 25SEP20

10.09.2020 Lufthansa today (08SEP20) filed additional changes to its Intercontinental operation for Northern winter 2020/21 season. Latest adjustment focuses on aircraft changes, as the airline removes Boeing 747-400 aircraft from scheduled operation during winter season.

Additional changes to be filed in the next few weeks.

Frankfurt – Bangalore A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Beijing Capital A340-300 replaces -600, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Boston A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Delhi A340-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Denver A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Dubai A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Hong Kong A340-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Houston A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Miami A340-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Mumbai A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Newark A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – New York JFK LH400/401 A330-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily (LH404/405 remains closed for reservation)
Frankfurt – Orlando A340-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – San Francisco A340-300 replaces -600, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Seoul Incheon A340-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Singapore A340-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda A340-300 replaces 747-8I, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Toronto A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Vancouver A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily
Frankfurt – Washington Dulles A330-300 replaces 747-400, 1 daily

Revised 747-8I operation:
Frankfurt – Bangkok
Frankfurt – Buenos Aires Ezeiza
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare (LH430/431)
Frankfurt – Johannesburg
Frankfurt – Los Angeles
Frankfurt – Mexico City
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong

Updated list of routes not available for reservation:
Frankfurt – Addis Ababa
Frankfurt – Austin
Frankfurt – Baku
Frankfurt – Casablanca
Frankfurt – Erbil
Frankfurt – Nagoya
Frankfurt – Panama City
Frankfurt – Qingdao
Frankfurt – Rio de Janeiro Galeao
Frankfurt – San Diego
Frankfurt – Shenyang
Munich – Bangalore
Munich – Hong Kong
Munich – Mexico City
Munich – New York JFK
Munich – Sao Paulo Guarulhos
Munich – Singapore
Munich – Washington Dulles

Published on 02.09.2020
Lufthansa September 2020 Boeing 747 Scheduled Passenger operations as of 30AUG20

Published on 27.08.2020
Eurowings re-opens Munich – Bangkok reservations from late-Oct 2020

26.08.2020 Lufthansa this month gradually filed planned European operations for Winter 2020/21 season, based number of flights available for reservation, between 25OCT20 and 27MAR21. As of 1000GMT 22AUG20, filed changes includes the following.

Following routes are not available for reservation for entire winter season until 27MAR21 inclusive:
Frankfurt – Bordeaux 5 weekly
Frankfurt – Bydgoszcz 7 weekly
Frankfurt – Cluj 6 weekly
Frankfurt – Florence 7 weekly
Frankfurt – Genoa 3 weekly
Frankfurt – Leipzig 34 weekly
Frankfurt – Muenster 27 weekly
Frankfurt – Palermo 1 weekly (no operation already scheduled for 10JAN21 – 13FEB21)
Frankfurt – Pamplona 4 weekly
Frankfurt – Santiago de Compostela 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Timisoara 7 weekly
Frankfurt – Zagreb 14 weekly
Munich – Dubrovnik 4 weekly
Munich – Edinburgh 3 weekly
Munich – Katowice 7 weekly
Munich – Ljubljana 7 weekly
Munich – Minsk 1 weekly
Munich – Moscow Domodedovo 14 weekly
Munich – Newcastle 6 weekly
Munich – Nuremberg 26 weekly
Munich – Rostock 10 weekly
Munich – St. Petersburg 6 weekly
Munich – Stuttgart 34 weekly
Munich – Tallinn 3 weekly
Munich – Thessaloniki 3 weekly
Munich – Tromso 2 weekly (seasonal from 12DEC20)

Operational frequencies listed below is based on number of flights available for reservation. As figures is based on the week of 09NOV20, frequency variation may occur on certain weeks. In the parenthesis, number of weekly flights listed is based on default schedule for November 2020, with variations throughout the season.

Frankfurt – Amsterdam 21 weekly flights available for reservations (43 weekly flights listed)
Frankfurt – Athens 14 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Barcelona 35 weekly (49)
Frankfurt – Bari 1 weekly (4)
Frankfurt – Basel/Mulhouse 12 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Belgrade 10 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Berlin 45 weekly (139)
Frankfurt – Bilbao 14 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – Billund 14 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Birmingham 13 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Bologna 13 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Bremen 18 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Brussels 24 weekly (45)
Frankfurt – Bucharest 14 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Budapest 21 weekly (40)
Frankfurt – Catania 1 weekly (2)
Frankfurt – Chisinau 1 weekly (4)
Frankfurt – Copenhagen 26 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Dresden 19 weekly (34)
Frankfurt – Dublin 16 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Dusseldorf 14 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Edinburgh 5 weekly (12)
Frankfurt – Faro 2 weekly (2)
Frankfurt – Friedrichshafen 12 weekly (27)
Frankfurt – Funchal 1 weekly (1)
Frankfurt – Gdansk 12 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Geneva 12 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Glasgow 3 weekly (12)
Frankfurt – Gothenburg 17 weekly (34)
Frankfurt – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly (2)
Frankfurt – Graz 16 weekly (26)
Frankfurt – Hamburg 32 weekly (106)
Frankfurt – Hannover 16 weekly (42)
Frankfurt – Helsinki 16 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Irakleion 1 weekly (1; no operation 15NOV20 – 05MAR21)
Frankfurt – Istanbul 7 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Ivalo 1 weekly (1; seasonal service from 19DEC20)
Frankfurt – Katowice 9 weekly (19)
Frankfurt – Krakow 21 weekly (27)
Frankfurt – Kuusamo 1 weekly (1; seasonal service from 19DEC20)
Frankfurt – Kyiv Borispil 14 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – Larnaca 3 weekly (3)
Frankfurt – Linz 12 weekly (20; Figure not including codeshare operated by Air Dolomiti)
Frankfurt – Lisbon 20 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – Ljubljana 14 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – London City 13 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – London Heathrow 38 weekly (84)
Frankfurt – Luxembourg 14 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Lyon 16 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Madrid 21 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Malaga 6 weekly (6)
Frankfurt – Malta 9 weekly (11)
Frankfurt – Manchester 15 weekly (34)
Frankfurt – Marseille 14 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – Milan Linate 28 weekly (41)
Frankfurt – Milan Malpensa 14 weekly (39)
Frankfurt – Minsk 7 weekly (11)
Frankfurt – Moscow Domodedovo 12 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Munich 30 weekly (96)
Frankfurt – Naples 6 weekly (7)
Frankfurt – Nice 14 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Nuremberg 19 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Oslo 21 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Palma Mallorca 11 weekly (15)
Frankfurt – Paris CDG 22 weekly (47)
Frankfurt – Porto 14 weekly (21)
Frankfurt – Poznan 14 weekly (20)
Frankfurt – Prague 21 weekly (34)
Frankfurt – Reykjavik Keflavik 1 weekly (3)
Frankfurt – Riga 10 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Rome 19 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Salzburg 16 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Seville 3 weekly (4)
Frankfurt – Sofia 14 weekly (19)
Frankfurt – St. Petersburg 12 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Stockholm Arlanda 21 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Stuttgart 21 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Tallinn 13 weekly (19)
Frankfurt – Tenerife South 2 weekly (2)
Frankfurt – Thessaloniki 3 weekly (4)
Frankfurt – Tirana 5 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Toulouse 11 weekly (26)
Frankfurt – Tromso 1 weekly from 19DEC20 (2)
Frankfurt – Valencia 14 weekly (19)
Frankfurt – Venice 25 weekly (35)
Frankfurt – Vienna 24 weekly (42)
Frankfurt – Vilnius 10 weekly (14)
Frankfurt – Warsaw 23 weekly (28)
Frankfurt – Wroclaw 14 weekly (27)
Frankfurt – Zurich 21 weekly (42)
Munich – Amsterdam 25 weekly available for reservations (40 weekly flights listed)
Munich – Ancona 7 weekly (20)
Munich – Athens 14 weekly (16)
Munich – Barcelona 19 weekly (34)
Munich – Basel/Mulhouse 13 weekly (34)
Munich – Belgrade 7 weekly (14)
Munich – Berlin 67 weekly (106)
Munich – Bilbao 20 weekly (27)
Munich – Birmingham 11 weekly (19)
Munich – Bremen 29 weekly (43)
Munich – Brussels 31 weekly (46)
Munich – Bucharest 14 weekly (21)
Munich – Budapest 18 weekly (32)
Munich – Catania 1 weekly (2)
Munich – Cluj 12 weekly (14)
Munich – Cologne 40 weekly (69)
Munich – Copenhagen 20 weekly (33)
Munich – Debrecen 3 weekly (5)
Munich – Dublin 6 weekly (13)
Munich – Dusseldorf 68 weekly (109)
Munich – Faro 2 weekly (2)
Munich – Fuerteventura 1 weekly (1)
Munich – Funchal 1 weekly (1)
Munich – Gdansk 10 weekly (14)
Munich – Geneva 19 weekly (33)
Munich – Genoa 7 weekly (13)
Munich – Gothenburg 7 weekly (21)
Munich – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 1 weekly (1)
Munich – Graz 12 weekly (21; Figure not including codeshare operated by Air Dolomiti)
Munich – Hamburg 78 weekly (121)
Munich – Hannover 33 weekly (58)
Munich – Helsinki 11 weekly (21)
Munich – Kittila 1 weekly (1; seasonal service from 12DEC20)
Munich – Krakow 14 weekly (21)
Munich – Kyiv Borispil 7 weekly (15)
Munich – Larnaca 6 weekly (7)
Munich – Leipzig 11 weekly (26)
Munich – Lisbon 7 weekly (13)
Munich – London Heathrow 27 weekly (61)
Munich – Luxembourg 12 weekly (24)
Munich – Lviv 5 weekly (7)
Munich – Lyon 13 weekly (27)
Munich – Madrid 13 weekly (27)
Munich – Malaga 3 weekly (3)
Munich – Malta 1 weekly (4)
Munich – Manchester 12 weekly (25)
Munich – Marseille 13 weekly (27)
Munich – Milan Malpensa 23 weekly (32)
Munich – Muenster 24 weekly (32)
Munich – Nantes 6 weekly (13)
Munich – Naples 7 weekly (21)
Munich – Nice 10 weekly (21)
Munich – Oslo 11 weekly (21)
Munich – Paderborn 15 weekly (24)
Munich – Palermo 1 weekly (3)
Munich – Palma Mallorca 2 weekly (3)
Munich – Paris CDG 13 weekly (45)
Munich – Paris Orly 14 weekly (14)
Munich – Porto 5 weekly (11)
Munich – Poznan 6 weekly (18)
Munich – Prague 12 weekly (27)
Munich – Rome 21 weekly (35)
Munich – Rzeszow 6 weekly (13)
Munich – Sarajevo 6 weekly (7)
Munich – Seville 3 weekly (4)
Munich – Sibiu 10 weekly (14)
Munich – Sofia 14 weekly (21)
Munich – Stockholm Arlanda 20 weekly (33)
Munich – Strasbourg 5 weekly (5)
Munich – Tenerife South 2 weekly (2)
Munich – Timisoara 12 weekly (21)
Munich – Toulouse 16 weekly (26)
Munich – Trieste 6 weekly (20)
Munich – Valencia 3 weekly (7)
Munich – Vienna 20 weekly (27)
Munich – Warsaw 12 weekly (21)
Munich – Wroclaw 12 weekly (20)
Munich – Zagreb 12 weekly (14)
Munich – Zurich 21 weekly (28)

Published on 22.08.2020
Lufthansa W20 European Preliminary operations as of 1000GMT 22AUG20

Published on 21.08.2020
Lübeck Air starts operations in a pandemic

14.08.2020 Lufthansa in recent weeks filed inventory update for Northern winter 2020/21 season. As of 12AUG20, reservations for following Intercontinental routes during the period of 25OCT20 – 27MAR21 is no longer available.

Frankfurt – Addis Ababa
Frankfurt – Erbil
Frankfurt – Nagoya
Frankfurt – Panama City
Frankfurt – Qingdao
Frankfurt – Rio de Janeiro Galeao
Frankfurt – San Diego
Frankfurt – Shenyang
Munich – Bangalore
Munich – Hong Kong
Munich – Mexico City
Munich – New York JFK
Munich – Sao Paulo Guarulhos
Munich – Singapore

Separately, following routes to see frequency reduction as the airline closed booking on certain flights:
Frankfurt – Cairo Reduce from 10 to 7 weekly, LH582/583 closed for reservation
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare Reduce from 2 to 1 daily, LH432/433 closed for reservation
Frankfurt – New York JFK Reduce from 2 to 1 daily, LH404/405 closed for reservation

Additional changes will be filed in the next few weeks.

14.08.20202 TUIfly in June 2020 removed schedule listing for its planned long-haul service from Dusseldorf, scheduled to commence in November 2020 with Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner aircraft.

Following planned long-haul routes has been removed during the week of 07JUN20. Reservation and schedule listing is no longer available on the airline’s website. Previously planned operation as follows.

Dusseldorf – Bridgetown eff 05NOV20 2 weekly flights operating every 2 weeks
Dusseldorf – Cancun eff 08NOV20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – La Romana eff 06NOV20 1 weekly, plus 2 weekly flights every 2 weeks
Dusseldorf – Montego Bay eff 15NOV20 1 weekly, plus 1 weekly flight every 2 weeks
Dusseldorf – Puerto Plata eff 04NOV20 1 weekly
Dusseldorf – Punta Cana eff 05NOV20 3 weekly

Published on 10.08.2020
Lufthansa To Resume Passenger Flights To India (DEL, BOM, BLR) on 13AUG20

Published on 09.08.2020
Lufthansa resumes flights to Frankfurt and Kabul

Published on 06.08.2020
Eurowings extends flight schedule by 26 new holiday destinations

05.08.2020 Lufthansa in recent schedule update adjusted Intercontinental operation for the period of 01AUG20 – 24OCT20. As of 02AUG20, planned operation as follows. Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s planned operation, as well as traffic rights.

Frankfurt – Abuja – Port Harcourt eff 20AUG20 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Algiers 1 weekly A321 (Every 2 weeks in September, schedule pending in October)
Frankfurt – Baku eff 01SEP20 2 weekly A321
Frankfurt – Beirut 3 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Bangkok 3 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Bangalore eff 16AUG20 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 01SSEP20)
Frankfurt – Boston 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 02SEP20)
Frankfurt – Cairo 9 weekly A321/321neo (1 daily A321neo from 28AUG20)
Frankfurt – Cancun eff 01OCT20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Cape Town eff 01SEP20 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 01OCT20)
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 747-8I
Frankfurt – Dallas/Ft. Worth eff 02SEP20 3 weekly
Frankfurt – Delhi eff 17AUG20 5 weekly A340-300 (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Detroit eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Dubai 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 02SEP20)
Frankfurt – Hong Kong 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 03SEP20)
Frankfurt – Johannesburg August operation (from FRA): 12, 26. 5 weekly 747-8I from 02SEP20 (1 Daily from 01OCT20)
Frankfurt – Kuwait City – Dammam eff 01SEP20 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Lagos – Malabo eff 20AUG20 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Los Angeles 5 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 02SEP20)
Frankfurt – Mexico City 3 weekly 747-8I (5 weekly from 01SEP20, 1 daily from 01OCT20)
Frankfurt – Miami 5 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Mumbai eff 16AUG20 5 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Nairobi 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 03SEP20)
Frankfurt – Nanjing 1 weekly 747-8I (A340-300 from 31AUG20)
Frankfurt – Newark 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – New York JFK 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Orlando eff 01SEP20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Philadelphia eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Riyadh – Bahrain eff 31AUG20 1 daily A330-300
Frankfurt – San Francisco eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – San Jose (Costa Rica) 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 5 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Seattle 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Seoul Incheon eff 01SEP20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly 747-8I (schedule on/after September is pending)
Frankfurt – Singapore 3 weekly A340-300 (1 Daily from 31AUG20)
Frankfurt – Tehran Imam Khomeini eff 14SEP20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 04OCT20)
Frankfurt – Tel Aviv 1 daily A321neo (17 weekly from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda 3 weekly A340-300 (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Toronto 5 weekly A330-300/340-300 (1 daily A340 from 02SEP20)
Frankfurt – Tunis 2 weekly A320neo (3 weekly A319 from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Vancouver 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 05SEP20)
Frankfurt – Washington Dulles eff 01SEP20 5 weekly A330-300
Munich – Charlotte eff 03SEP20 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 02OCT20)
Munich – Chicago O’Hare 5 weekly A350-900XWB (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Munich – Delhi eff 16AUG20 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 02SEP20)
Munich – Denver eff 01SEP20 5 weekly A350-900XWB (1 daily from 03OCT20)
Munich – Los Angeles 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – Montreal 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 04SEP20)
Munich – Newark 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 03SEP20)
Munich – Osaka Kansai eff 01SEP20 5 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – San Francisco 5 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Seoul Incheon 3 weekly (5 weekly from 02SEP20)
Munich – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 01SEP20 1 weekly A350-900XWB (schedule in October is pending)
Munich – Tbilisi 2 weekly A321 (A319 from 30AUG20, 3 weekly from 05OCT20)
Munich – Tel Aviv 3 weekly A319 (5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – Tokyo Haneda 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)

Published on 04.08.2020
TUI extends cancellation of holidays and flights to Portugal for UK customers

Published on 30.07.2020
TUI cancels all flights to Balearic, Canary Islands until 4 August for U.K. travelers because of COVID-19 concerns

Published on 27.07.2020
Lufthansa resumes flights between Frankfurt and New York

Published on 23.07.2020
Lufthansa Resumes Frankfurt Flights at London City Airport

23.07.2020 Condor earlier this month revised planned long-haul network for the remainder of Northern summer 2020 season, until 24OCT20. Latest adjustment as of 22JUL20 as follows.

Additional changes remain possible.

Frankfurt – Cape Town eff 03OCT20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Punta Cana eff 02OCT20 4 weekly
Frankfurt – Varadero eff 02OCT20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Windhoek – Cape Town eff 01OCT20 2 weekly
Published on 20.07.2020
Tbilisi-Munich Regular Flights to Resume Starting August 2

03.07.2020
Lufthansa
this week filed revised Inter-continental operation for the remainder of summer 2020 season, until 24OCT20. Between 01JUL20 and 24OCT20, the Star Alliance carrier plans to operate following routes.

Various travel restriction will impact the airline’s passenger traffic rights, as well as planned operation.

Frankfurt – Abuja – Port Harcourt eff 18JUL20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Frankfurt – Bangalore eff 15JUL20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Bangkok 3 weekly 747-8I (5 weekly from 02AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Beirut 3 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Boston 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 29AUG20)
Frankfurt – Cairo 5 weekly A321neo (1 daily from 31AUG20)
Frankfurt – Cape Town eff 01SEP20 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 30SEP20)
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare 5 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 31JUL20)
Frankfurt – Dallas/Ft. Worth eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Delhi eff 15JUL20 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Detroit eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Dubai 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 04SEP20)
Frankfurt – Hong Kong 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 01AUG20)
Frankfurt – Houston 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 29JUL20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Johannesburg eff 31AUG20 5 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 29SEP20)
Frankfurt – Kuwait – Dammam eff 04AUG20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 03SEP20)
Frankfurt – Lagos – Malabo eff 16JUL20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Frankfurt – Los Angeles 3 weekly 747-8I (5 weekly from 03AUG20, 1 daily from 30AUG20)
Frankfurt – Mexico City 3 weekly 747-8I (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 31AUG20)
Frankfurt – Mumbai 3 weekly A330-300 (1 daily 747-400 06JUL20 – 14JUL20, 5 weekly from 01AUG20)
Frankfurt – Nairobi eff 06JUL20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 02AUG20)
Frankfurt – Newark 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 02AUG20, 1 daily from 30AUG20)
Frankfurt – New York JFK 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 02AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Orlando eff 02AUG20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Philadelphia eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Riyadh – Bahrain eff 25JUL20 5 weekly A330-300 (1 daily from 28AUG20)
Frankfurt – San Francisco eff 02SEP20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – San Jose (Costa Rica) eff 01AUG20 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 5 weekly 747-8I (1 daily from 01AUG20)
Frankfurt – Seattle eff 01AUG20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Seoul Incheon eff 01SEP20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 747-8I (2 weekly from 01AUG20, 3 weekly from 07SEP20, 5 weekly from 30SEP20)
Frankfurt – Singapore eff 31JUL20 5 weekly A340-300 (1 daily from 02SEP20)
Frankfurt – Tehran Imam Khomeini eff 31AUG20 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 04OCT20)
Frankfurt – Tel Aviv 1 daily A321neo (10 weekly from 01AUG20, 2 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 02AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Toronto 3 weekly A340-300 (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Tunis eff 31AUG20 3 weekly A319
Frankfurt – Vancouver 3 weekly A330-300 (5 weekly from 02AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Frankfurt – Washington Dulles eff 01SEP20 5 weekly A330-300
Munich – Charlotte eff 31JUL20 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – Chicago O’Hare 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01AUG20, 1 daily from 01SEP20)
Munich – Delhi 3 weekly A350-900XWB (1 daily 06JUL20 – 14JUL20, 5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – Denver eff 01AUG20 6 weekly A350-900XWB (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Munich – Los Angeles 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01AUG20)
Munich – Montreal 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 04SEP20)
Munich – Newark 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – Osaka Kansai eff 01AUG20 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)
Munich – San Francisco 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 02AUG20)
Munich – Seoul Incheon 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 04AUG20 1 weekly A350-900XWB (2 weekly from 06SEP20, 3 weekly from 02OCT20)
Munich – Tel Aviv 5 weekly A319 (1 daily from 01SEP20)
Munich – Tokyo Haneda eff 01AUG20 3 weekly A350-900XWB (5 weekly from 01SEP20)

01.07.2020 German carrier TUIfly earlier this month resumed regular passenger operation, initially from its base in Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Hannover and Stuttgart. Additional bases will be gradually resumed from the first week of July 2020, including Basel/Mulhouse, Cologne, Hamburg, Munich, Paderborn. Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden, Saarbruecken and Berlin Tegel to be resumed from 08JUL20, 14JUL20 and 03AUG20, respectively.

Various travel restrictions will impact the airline’s planned operation, and selected dates will see the airline operates triangle routing, instead of nonstop terminator. Planned operation for the period of 15JUN20 – 31AUG20 as follows. Service to/from Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden and Paderborn is operated by Sundair aircraft.

Basel/Mulhouse – Corfu eff 01AUG20 2 weekly
Basel/Mulhouse – Fuerteventura eff 04JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 03AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Funchal eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Basel/Mulhouse – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (3 weekly from 02AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Irakleion eff 04JUL20 4 weekly (5 weekly from 17JUL20, 7 from 01AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Kos eff 06JUL20 1 weekly (4 weekly from 01AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Mahon eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Basel/Mulhouse – Palma Mallorca eff 04JUL20 3 weekly (7 weekly from 01AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Rhodes eff 07JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 18JUL20, 4 from 05AUG20)
Basel/Mulhouse – Tenerife South eff 09JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 01AUG20)
Berlin Tegel – Irakleion eff 04AUG20 1 weekly
Berlin Tegel – Kos eff 03AUG20 1 weekly
Berlin Tegel – Rhodes eff 05AUG20 1 weekly
Cologne – Corfu eff 04AUG20 1 weekly
Cologne – Fuerteventura eff 01JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 07AUG20)
Cologne – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 12JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 06AUG20)
Cologne – Irakleion eff 10JUL20 4 weekly
Cologne – Kos eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 03AUG20)
Cologne – Mahon eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Cologne – Malta eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Cologne – Palma Mallorca eff 09JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 20JUL20, 5 from 01AUG20)
Cologne – Rhodes eff 14JUL20 1 weekly (3 weekly from 05AUG20)
Cologne – Tenerife South eff 04JUL20 2 weekly
Cologne – Trieste 16AUG20 / 23AUG20
Dusseldorf – Corfu eff 04JUL20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Dalaman eff 17JUL20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Djerba eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Dusseldorf – Enfidha eff 02AUG20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Faro 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Fuerteventura eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 20JUL20, 6 from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Funchal eff 05JUL20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 05JUL20 4 weekly (6 weekly from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Hurghada eff 03AUG20 4 weekly
Dusseldorf – Ibiza eff 29JUN20 1 weekly (3 weekly from 14JUL20, 5 from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Irakleion eff 01JUL20 3 weekly (4 weekly from 14JUL20, 5 weekly from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Jerez de la Frontera eff 02JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 13JUL@0)
Dusseldorf – Kos eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 20JUL20, 4 from 05AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Lanzarote eff 01JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly 12JUL20, 4 from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Larnaca eff 02JUL20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Mahon eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 16JUL20)
Dusseldorf – Marsa Alam eff 04AUG20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Palma Mallorca 6 weekly (8 weekly from 01JUL20, 14 from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Patrai eff 03JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Rhodes eff 02JUL20 3 weekly (4 weekly from 10JUL20, 6 from 01AUG20)
Dusseldorf – Tenerife South eff 06JUL20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 03AUG20)
Frankfurt – Agadir eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Barcelona eff 07AUG20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Corfu eff 11JUL20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Dalaman eff 17JUL20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Djerba eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Enfidha eff 02AUG20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Faro 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Fuerteventura eff 01JUL20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 11JUL20, 5 from 06AUG20)
Frankfurt – Funchal eff 19JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 28JUL20)
Frankfurt – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 03JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 20JUL20, 3 from 26JUL20, 5 from 03AUG20)
Frankfurt – Hurghada eff 01AUG20 5 weekly
Frankfurt – Ibiza eff 11JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Frankfurt – Irakleion eff 01JUL20 2 weekly (5 weekly from 17JUL20, 7 from 05AUG20)
Frankfurt – Jerez de la Frontera eff 12JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 03AUG20)
Frankfurt – Kos eff 01JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 24JUL20, 4 from 03AUG20)
Frankfurt – Lamezia Terme eff 01AUG20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Lanzarote eff 04JUL20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Larnaca eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Mahon eff 12JUL20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Marsa Alam eff 04AUG20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Palma Mallorca 6 weekly (10 weekly from 01AUG20)
Frankfurt – Patrai eff 03JUL20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Rhodes eff 01JUL20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 14JUL20, 6 from 02AUG20)
Frankfurt – Tenerife South eff 02JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 11JUL20, 3 from 04AUG20)
Hamburg – Fuerteventura eff 10JUL20 1 weekly

Hamburg – Funchal eff 04JUL20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 02JUL20 1 weekly

Hamburg – Irakleion eff 21JUL20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Kos eff 06JUL20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Malta eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Rhodes eff 22JUL20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Tenerife South eff 12JUL20 1 weekly
Hamburg – Trieste 16AUG20 / 23AUG20
Hannover – Agadir eff 03AUG20 1 weekly
Hannover – Corfu eff 11JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 28JUL20)
Hannover – Dalaman eff 17JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 03AUG20)
Hannover – Djerba eff 05AUG20 1 weekly
Hannover – Enfidha eff 02AUG20 2 weekly
Hannover – Faro 2 weekly (3 weekly from 07AUG20)
Hannover – Fuerteventura eff 01JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 13JUL20, 5 from 06AUG20)
Hannover – Funchal eff 07JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 26JUL20)
Hannover – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 24JUL20, 4 from 31JUL20)
Hannover – Hurghada eff 04AUG20 2 weekly
Hannover – Ibiza eff 27JUN20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 07JUL20)
Hannover – Irakleion eff 01JUL20 1 weekly (4 weekly from 13JUL20, 6 from 01AUG20)
Hannover – Jerez de la Frontera eff 23JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 02AUG20)
Hannover – Kos eff 29JUN20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 15JUL20, 3 from 24JUL20, 4 from 01AUG20)
Hannover – Lanzarote eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 05AUG20)
Hannover – Larnaca eff 23JUL20 1 weekly
Hannover – Mahon eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 23JUL20)
Hannover – Malta eff 02AUG20 1 weekly (No service 10AUG20 – 29AUG20, except 21AUG20)
Hannover – Marsa Alam eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Hannover – Palma Mallorca 7 weekly (12 weekly from 01AUG20)
Hannover – Patrai eff 10JUL20 1 weekly
Hannover – Rhodes eff 07JUL20 1 weekly (3 weekly from 25JUL20, 5 from 05AUG20)
Hannover – Tenerife South eff 18JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 06AUG20, 3 from 16AUG20)
Hannover – Trieste 16AUG20 / 23AUG20
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Fuerteventura eff 03AUG20 1 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Hurghada eff 04AUG20 1 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Irakleion eff 01AUG20 2 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Kos eff 08JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 01AUG20)
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Palma Mallorca eff 02AUG20 5 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Rhodes eff 09JUL20 1 weekly
Karlsruhe/Baden-Baden – Tenerife South eff 07AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Corfu eff 07JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 01AUG20)
Munich – Dalaman eff 03AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Djerba eff 05AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Fuerteventura eff 02JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 01AUG20)
Munich – Funchal eff 21JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 02AUG20)
Munich – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 13JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 05AUG20)
Munich – Kos eff 10JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 22JUL20, 5 from 01AUG20)
Munich – Hurghada eff 04AUG20 3 weekly
Munich – Ibiza eff 01AUG20 2 weekly
Munich – Irakleion eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 15JUL20, 7 from 01AUG20)
Munich – Jerez de la Frontera eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Lanzarote eff 12JUL20 1 weekly
Munich – Mahon eff 12JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 06AUG20)
Munich – Marsa Alam eff 07AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Malta eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Munich – Patrai eff 31JUL20 1 weekly
Munich – Rhodes eff 06JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 22JUL20, 5 from 01AUG20)
Munich – Tenerife South eff 11JUL20 2 weekly
Munich – Trieste 16AUG20 / 23AUG20
Nuremberg – Corfu eff 18JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Nuremberg – Fuerteventura eff 25JUL20 1 weekly
Nuremberg – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 19JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 05AUG20)
Nuremberg – Hurghada eff 03AUG20 2 weekly
Nuremberg – Irakleion eff 19JUL20 1 weekly (4 weekly from 05AUG20)
Nuremberg – Kos eff 20JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 07AUG20)
Nuremberg – Marsa Alam eff 04AUG20 1 weekly
Nuremberg – Palma Mallorca eff 01AUG20 3 weekly
Nuremberg – Rhodes eff 18JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 06AUG20)
Paderborn – Fuerteventura eff 13JUL20 2 weekly
Paderborn – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 19JUL20 1 weekly
Paderborn – Hurghada eff 04AUG20 1 weekly
Paderborn – Irakleion eff 03JUL20 2 weekly
Paderborn – Rhodes eff 02JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 19JUL20)
Paderborn – Tenerife South eff 18JUL20 1 weekly
Saarbruecken – Fuerteventura eff 01AUG20 1 weekly
Saarbruecken – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 02AUG20 1 weekly
Saarbruecken – Kos eff 01AUG20 2 weekly
Saarbruecken – Irakleion eff 14JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Saarbruecken – Palma Mallorca eff 01AUG20 7 weekly
Saarbruecken – Rhodes eff 06AUG20 1 weekly
Saarbruecken – Tenerife South eff 05AUG20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Corfu eff 07JUL20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Dalaman eff 20JUL20 1 weekly (2 weekly from 07AUG20)
Stuttgart – Faro 1 weekly (2 weekly from 08JUL20, 3 from 26JUL20)
Stuttgart – Fuerteventura eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 31JUL20)
Stuttgart – Funchal eff 19JUL20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 05JUL20 1 weekly (3 weekly from 24JUL20, 4 from 05AUG20)
Stuttgart – Hurghada eff 04AUG20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Ibiza eff 01AUG20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Irakleion eff 03JUL20 3 weekly (5 weekly from 10JUL20, 7 from 03AUG20)
Stuttgart – Jerez de la Frontera eff 27JUL20 3 weekly
Stuttgart – Kos eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 22JUL20, 4 from 07AUG20)
Stuttgart – Lanzarote eff 12JUL20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Mahon eff 02AUG20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Marsa Alam eff 05AUG20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Palma Mallorca 6 weekly (9 weekly from 01AUG20)
Stuttgart – Patrai eff 10JUL20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Rhodes eff 06JUL20 2 weekly (5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Stuttgart – Tenerife South eff 04JUL20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 06AUG20)

Published on 30.06.2020
TUIfly June – August 2020 operations as of 28JUN20

Published on 28.06.2020
Lufthansa resumes flights between Frankfurt, Shanghai as COVID-19 restrictions ease

Published on 23.06.2020
Lufthansa to close SunExpress Germany

Published on 22.06.2020
Sundair S20 operations as of 21JUN20

Published on 12.06.2020
Condor Sep/Oct 2020 Long-Haul operations as of 11JUN20

Published on 10.06.2020Eurowings adds new flights as demand increases

 

10.06.2020 SunExpress Germany this week plans to resume scheduled passenger service, initially on flights to/from Dusseldorf, Frankfurt and Stuttgart. Planned operation for the month of June 2020, as of 08JUN20 as follows.

Dusseldorf – Adana 
eff 11JUN20 3 weekly
Dusseldorf – Kayseri eff 12JUN20 3 weekly
Dusseldorf – Ordu-Giresun eff 13JUN20 2 weekly
Dusseldorf – Trabzon 
eff 13JUN20 2 weekly
Frankfurt – Ankara eff 13JUN20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Kayseri eff 12JUN20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Adana eff 11JUN20 1 weekly
Stuttgart – Ankara eff 15JUN20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Kayseri eff 11JUN20 2 weekly
Stuttgart – Trabzon eff 16JUN20 1 weeklyAdditional routes and frequencies will be added by late-June and early-July 2020.

Published on 09.06.2020

Eurowings resumes Frankfurt–Windhoek service eff. 30JUN20

SunExpress Germany June 2020 operations as of 08JUN20

 

Published on 07.06.2020

COVID-19: Lufthansa offers ‘return-flight-guarantee’

 

03.06.2020. Lufthansa last week extended interim schedule to late-June 2020, as the airline continues to restore additional European markets from 15JUN20. Planned European operation for the month of June 2020 as follows.

Additional changes remain likely, due to various travel restrictions.

Frankfurt – Amsterdam 2 daily E190
Frankfurt – Athens 1 daily A320neo (2 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Barcelona 2 daily A320neo (A320neo/321neo from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Berlin Tegel 3 daily A320neo
Frankfurt – Bilbao eff 15JUN20 3 weekly A319
Frankfurt – Billund eff 01JUN20 3 weekly E190 (5 weekly from 16JUN20)
Frankfurt – Birmingham eff 15JUN20 5 weekly E190/A319
Frankfurt – Bologna eff 15JUN20 4 weekly E195 (Air Dolomiti aircraft)
Frankfurt – Bremen eff 15JUN20 12 weekly A319/CRJ900/E190
Frankfurt – Brussels 2 daily E190/CRJ900
Frankfurt – Bucharest eff 17JUN20 1 daily A320neo
Frankfurt – Budapest eff 01JUN20 1 daily A320neo (2 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Copenhagen 2 daily E190/A320neo
Frankfurt – Dresden eff 15JUN20 12 weekly CRJ900/E190
Frankfurt – Dublin eff 01JUN20 5 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Dubrovnik eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Faro 
eff 20JUN20 2 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Geneva 1 daily E190 until 14JUN20
Frankfurt – Gothenburg 5 weekly E190 (1 daily from 20JUN20 with various aircraft)
Frankfurt – Hamburg 3 daily E190 (2 on weekdays; A320 series from 15JUN@0)
Frankfurt – Hannover eff 01JUN20 13 weekly E190
Frankfurt – Helsinki 1 daily E190
Frankfurt – Heringsdorf eff 06JUN20 1 weekly E190
Frankfurt – Ibiza eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Krakow eff 07JUN20 5 weekly E190 (1 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Kyiv Borispil eff 15JUN20 5 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Larnaca eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Lisbon 2 daily A321neo
Frankfurt – Ljubljana eff 15JUN20 6 weekly E190
Frankfurt – London Heathrow 3 daily A320neo/321neo
Frankfurt – Lyon eff 16JUN20 3 weekly E190
Frankfurt – Madrid 2 daily A320neo (3 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Malaga eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Malta 
eff 17JUN20 3 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Manchester eff 01JUN20 6 weekly E190/A320neo
Frankfurt – Milan Malpensa 1 daily E195 (2 daily from 16JUN20; Air Dolomiti aircraft)
Frankfurt – Munich 2 daily A320neo (3 daily from 08JUN20)
Frankfurt – Nice eff 04JUN20 3 weekly E190/A320neo
Frankfurt – Oslo 2 daily A320neo (3 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Palma Mallorca eff 06JUN20 1 weekly A320neo (3 weekly from 19JUN20 with A320neo/321neo)
Frankfurt – Paris CDG 2 daily A320neo
Frankfurt – Porto 4 weekly A321neo (5 weekly from 20JUN20, A320neo/321neo)
Frankfurt – Prague eff 01JUN20 1 daily E190 (2 daily from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Pula eff 20JUN20 1 weekly E190
Frankfurt – Riga eff 02JUN20 3 weekly A320neo
Frankfurt – Rome 1 daily A320neo (2 daily from 08JUN20, various aircraft)
Frankfurt – Sofia eff 01JUN20 3 weekly A320neo (1 daily from 23JUN20)

Frankfurt – Split eff 20JUN20 1 weekly
Frankfurt – Stockholm 2 daily A320neo
Frankfurt – Sylt eff 01JUN20 2 weekly E190 (1 weekly A319 from 19JUN20)
Frankfurt – Tallinn 4 weekly A320neo (1 daily E190/A320neo from 15JUN20)
Frankfurt – Venice 
eff 15JUN20 1 daily E195 (Air Dolomiti aircraft)
Frankfurt – Vienna 
2 daily A320neo
Frankfurt – Vilnius 4 weekly A320neo (5 weekly from 16JUN20)
Frankfurt – Warsaw 2 daily A320neo (1 daily on Sundays)
Frankfurt – Zurich 2 daily E190/A320neo
Munich – Amsterdam eff 15JUN20 6 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Athens eff 15JUN20 5 weekly A319
Munich – Barcelona eff 15JUN20 1 daily A319
Munich – Basel/Mulhouse eff 15JUN20 6 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Bastia eff 20JUN20 1 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Belgrade eff 23JUN20 3 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Berlin Tegel 18 weekly A319/CRJ900
Munich – Bremen 6 weekly A319/CRJ900 (12 weekly from 15JUN20)
Munich – Brussels eff 01JUN20 6 weekly CRJ900 (2 daily from 15JUN20)
Munich – Bucharest eff 17JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Budapest eff 16JUN20 3 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Catania eff 20JUN20 1 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Copenhagen eff 15JUN20 1 daily CRJ900/A319
Munich – Dubrovnik eff 20JUN20 1 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Dusseldorf 18 weekly A319/CRJ900 (33 weekly from 15JUN20)
Munich – Faro eff 17JUN20 2 weekly A319
Munich – Geneva eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Hamburg 18 weekly A319/CRJ900 (32 weekly from 15JUN20)
Munich – Hannover 6 weekly A319/CRJ900
Munich – Helsinki eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900/A319
Munich – Larnaca eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A319
Munich – Lisbon eff 15JUN20 5 weekly A319
Munich – London Heathrow eff 15JUN20 1 daily A320neo
Munich – Luxembourg eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Lyon eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Madrid eff 15JUN20 1 daily CRJ900/A319
Munich – Malaga eff 20JUN20 1 weekly A319
Munich – Milan Malpensa 1 daily CRJ900 (12 weekly from 15JUN20)
Munich – Muenster 6 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Nice eff 15JUN20 4 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Palermo eff 20JUN20 1 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Palma Mallorca eff 06JUN20 1 weekly A319 (3 weekly A319/CRJ900 from 15JUN20)
Munich – Paris CDG eff 15JUN20 1 daily CRJ900/A319
Munich – Porto eff 17JUN20 3 weekly A319/CRJ900
Munich – Prague eff 15JUN20 3 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Rome eff 03JUN20 4 weekly CRJ900 (14 weekly CRJ900/A319 from 15JUN20)
Munich – Rostock 2 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Split 
eff 20JUN20 1 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Stockholm Arlanda eff 15JUN20 1 daily A319/CRJ900
Munich – Sylt 6 weekly A319/CRJ900
Munich – Toulouse eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Vienna eff 01JUN20 5 weekly A319/CRJ900 (11 weekly from 15JUN20)
Munich – Warsaw eff 15JUN20 5 weekly CRJ900
Munich – Zurich eff 01JUN20 1 daily A319/CRJ900 (2 daily CRJ900 from 15JUN20)

02.06.2020

Lufthansa last week extended interim schedule by additional 2 weeks, now in effect until 30JUN20. For the month of June 2020, the Star Alliance carrier is resuming additional Inter-continental routes in the second half. Planned operation as of 31MAY20 as follows.

Frankfurt – Abuja – Port Harcourt eff 07JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Bangkok eff 03JUN20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Beijing Capital eff 23JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Cairo eff 09JUN20 1 weekly A321neo (3 weekly from 16JUN20)
Frankfurt – Chicago O’Hare 3 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Dubai eff 07JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Johannesburg eff 02JUN20 3 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Mexico City eff 03JUN20 3 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Mumbai eff 03JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Newark 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – Riyadh – Bahrain eff 14JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Frankfurt – San Jose (Costa Rica) eff 17JUN20 2 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 5 weekly 747-8I
Frankfurt – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 22JUN20 3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Tel Aviv eff 02JUN20 3 weekly A321neo
Frankfurt – Tokyo Haneda 
3 weekly A340-300
Frankfurt – Toronto eff 03JUN20 3 weekly A330-300
Munich – Chicago O’Hare eff 02JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Delhi eff 16JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Los Angeles eff 03JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Montreal eff 22JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – San Francisco eff 23JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Seoul Incheon eff 22JUN20 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Munich – Tel Aviv eff 03JUN20 3 weekly A319

01.06 Lufthansa Group airlines will restart eight routes from the UK and Ireland on June 15 as the group’s carriers ramp up services to summer holiday destinations and business centers with Europe attempting a slow return to normalcy from COVID-19 lockdowns.

From June 15, Lufthansa Group airlines will operate 115 weekly frequencies in total from Birmingham (BHX), Edinburgh (EDI), London Heathrow (LHR) and Manchester (MAN) in the UK as well as Dublin (DUB)—11 of the weekly frequencies will be from the Irish capital.

The restarted routes will be: DUB-Geneva (GVA), to be operated by subsidiary SWISS International Air Lines; LHR-Munich (MUC), to be operated by Lufthansa; LHR-Vienna (VIE), to be operated by another subsidiary, Austrian Airlines; LHR-Brussels (BRU), to be operated by a third subsidiary, Brussels Airlines; MAN-Zurich (ZRH), to be operated by SWISS; BHX-BRU, to be operated by Brussels Airlines; EDI-Frankfurt (FRA), to be operated by Lufthansa; and EDI-GVA, to be operated by SWISS-subsidiary Edelweiss.

Published on 29.05.2020
Eurowings to being operations from Germany 15 June

Published on 24.05.2020
Lufthansa to resume flights to 20 destinations from mid-June

Published on 21.05.2020
Condor to resume its summer schedule on June 25

Published on 20.05.2020
Eurowings is significantly expanding its flight schedule from June 2020 and will return to Bosnia and Herzegovina, while growing its presence in Croatia

Lufthansa
Lufthansa to resume flights to 20 destinations from mid-June

Lufthansa
Lufthansa 01 – 14JUN20 operations as of 14MAY20

Read more
Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Germany
Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

Free movement of people. Instruction to keep 1.5m distance between people and to wear the mask in public transport and shops. AHA+H+L rule applies (see Other below). Fines are applied for those refusing to wear masks. Restrictions to be introduced if the number of new infections reaches 35/100.000 in the last 7 days (see Other below).

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 08 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Since 8 August travelers returning to Germany from risk areas need to provide either a negative test result which is not older than 48h or undergo a test within 10 days after arrival. Quarantine is mandatory until negative test result is received. Since 15 September tests are not anymore for free. As risk areas are defined areas in which the number of cases during the last 7 days is above 50 per 100.000 inhabitants. The list is maintained by Robert Koch Institute (see link below). Random controls of measures. From 1 October quarantine can be ended at the earliest 5 days after a negative test result.
Information of travelers using airplanes or ships are recorded at arrival in Germany.
It is generally recommended to not travel to risk areas.

Read more
Flight Restrictions

published 27.11.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.

– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.

– This does not apply to passengers with a long term visa issued by EEA Member States or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Germany after 17 March 2020.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of British nationals. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers traveling as students if they cannot complete their study outside Germany.
– This does not apply to unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a copy of the identity document of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

Passengers arriving from high risk countries must register before departure at einreiseanmeldung.de

More Coronavirus (COVID-19) related information can be found at bundespolizei.de

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Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation- subject to categorisation.

Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests

Also see FAQ on corona testing and quarantine

Read more
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification subject to special conditions.

Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests

Also see FAQ on corona testing and quarantine

Read more
Vaccination

Yellow fever (2019)
Country requirement at entry: no
WHO vaccination recommendation: no

Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

All shops are open under the condition that distance & sanitary measures are respected. End of May/beginning of June in most federal states theaters, cinemas, restaurants, gyms, swimming pools are reopening. In all states restaurants and bars are open (mandatory is registration of people and seating), restrictions to be introduced if the number of new infections reaches 35/100.000 in the last 7 days (see Other below).

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

If more than 35 new infections per 100.000 in one week reduction of nb of people who can meet to 25 for public-, 15 for private events.
If more than 50 new infections per 100.000 in one week reduction of nb of people who can meet to 10 in public areas and 10 from max 2 housholds in private locations. Number of participants to other events should then also not be >100 (exceptions on request are possible).
Big events (>500) are suspended until 31 December.

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Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 03 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Distance and hygiene measures to be respected. Presence is organised in shifts. In addition, wearing masks in schools is recommended but in some states schools can decide.

Other

Other: partially closed/partially cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

35 new infections per 100.000 inhabitants is used as 1st threshold to start implementing stricter measures, from 50 new infections/100.000 measure should be more strict (so-called hotspot strategy is applied: mandatory curfew for bars at and no more alcohol served for outside consumption after 23.00, reduction of people who can meet to 10). Heavily debated is that some regions have introduced bans for tourists from red zones to stay in hotels. If numbers do not go down within the following 10 days then stricter measures should be applied.
All citizens are invited to use the Corona-Warn-App which is available since 16 June 2020.
General rules extended to AHA+H+L meaning distance+hygiene+mask+App+ventilation

Read more

Full Restrictions

  • Germany Latest News: Government says COVID-19 restrictions likely to continue in January 2021 (Reuters, 26.11.2020). Munich Airport Closes Terminal 1 (Frequesnt Business Traveller, 20.11.2020). Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    01.12.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Government says COVID-19 restrictions likely to continue in January 2021 (Reuters, 26.11.2020). Munich Airport Closes Terminal 1 (Frequesnt Business Traveller, 20.11.2020). Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    27.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Government to extend partial lockdown until 20 December (Reuters,25.11.2020). Munich Airport Closes Terminal 1 (Frequesnt Business Traveller, 20.11.2020). Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    25.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Munich Airport Closes Terminal 1 (Frequesnt Business Traveller, 20.11.2020). Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020) Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    23.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Munich Airport Closes Terminal 1 (Frequesnt Business Traveller, 20.11.2020). Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020) Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    19.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020) Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Entry restrictions

    Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.

    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days.

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    No special documentation is required.

    Find out more…

    Federal Foreign Office

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:

    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;

    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;

    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries:

    Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay

    This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.

    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions: Public spaces and services. From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19: • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people. • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open. • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers. • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism. • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed. • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed. • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited. • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed. • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible. Schools and nurseries remain open. Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany. These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    17.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Berlin Tegel Airport closes; all air traffic in capital region will be concentrated at Berlin Brandenburg Airport (Focus On Travel News, 10.11.2020). Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020) Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    *From within the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.
    Find out more: Federal Foreign Office.

    *Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions. And Latest information in German.

    *From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Public spaces and services
    From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people.
    • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open.
    • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers.
    • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism.
    • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed.
    • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed.
    • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited.
    • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed.
    • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible.
    Schools and nurseries remain open.
    Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany.
    These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    11.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Germany adds U.K to travel quarantine list (Sky News,05.11.2020) Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    *From within the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. Find out more: Federal Foreign Office

    *Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions. And Latest information in German.

    *From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Public spaces and services
    From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people.
    • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open.
    • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers.
    • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism.
    • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed.
    • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed.
    • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited.
    • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed.
    • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible.
    Schools and nurseries remain open.
    Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany.
    These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    05.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    *From within the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. Find out more: Federal Foreign Office

    *Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with the updated list published by the Council or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions. And Latest information in German.

    *From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Public spaces and services
    From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people.
    • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open.
    • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers.
    • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism.
    • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed.
    • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed.
    • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited.
    • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed.
    • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible.
    Schools and nurseries remain open.
    Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany.
    These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    03.11.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Nationwide lockdown expected to start on 2 November because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Turkey: Germany extends its travel warning for whole country from 9 November (Reuters, 28.10.2020). Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    *From within the EU: Entry is not permitted.
    Entry restrictions- Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. *Find out more: Federal Foreign Office.

    *Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.. And Latest information in German.

    *From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.
    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.
    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).
    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Public spaces and services
    From 2 November, there will be a range of restrictions on social contact in Germany, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • Individuals will only be able to gather with members of their own and one additional household up to 10 people.
    • Beauty salons, tattoo salons, massage parlours are closed. Barbers and hairdressers remain open.
    • Non-essential shops remain open, as long as there is at least 10m per between customers.
    • Overnight stays in hotels etc. only when necessary and not for tourism.
    • Theatres, operas, concert halls are closed.
    • Trade fairs, cinemas, theme parks, gambling venues are closed.
    • Amateur sport in private and public venues such as tracks, swimming pools, fitness studios is prohibited.
    • Restaurants, bars, clubs, discos, pubs etc. are closed; food delivery and take-away is allowed.
    • Employers are encouraged to allow employees to work from home where possible.
    Schools and nurseries remain open.
    Mouth-nose coverings are compulsory in many public spaces in Germany.
    These restrictions are the minimum and are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. The rules may vary so check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.

    Read more
    30.10.2020
  • Germany “We need to act and we need to act now,” the Chancellor said at a press conference on Wednesday evening that was also attended by Berlin mayor Michael Müller and Bavarian leader Markus Söder.

    The new rules will come into force on Monday November 2nd.

    “Our most important instrument against the virus is tracing infections,” said the Chancellor. But she added that the health agencies had reached their limits and were no longer able to trace cases. “For this reason we need to all have a national effort during the month of November.”

    Restaurants, bars, theatres and concert halls will all be closed for the entire month.

    Merkel also promised an “extraordinary financial package” to help the gastronomy and hotel industry which will be forced to close for four weeks.

    Berlin’s mayor Müller said that schools and Kitas will stay open throughout the new shutdown.

    According to an unconfirmed report in der Spiegel, The package of restrictions will include reducing contact outside the home to two households and a maximum of 10 people.

    As The Local has been reporting, the government has proposed a ‘lockdown light’ for most of November in a bid to ‘save Christmas’. It would result in bars, cafes and restaurants closing as well as leisure facilities.

    But schools and shops would stay open.

    https://www.thelocal.de/20201028/germanys-new-lockdown-measures-to-come-into-force-on-november-2nd

    Read more
    29.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: German government issues travel warnings for Ireland, Poland, Switzerland and most of Austria in attempt to curb spread of COVID-19 (Reuters, 22.10.2020). Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020) German authority warns against nonessential travel to France, Malta, Netherlands and Slovakia (Reuters, 15.10.2020). Authorities announce new restrictions in Berlin and Frankfurtas as COVID-19 cases surge (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Authorities announce Bars and restaurants are to close at 11:00pm local time (21:00 GMT) in Berlin until October 31 in a partial curfew, a measure already imposed in Frankfurt (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    *From within the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the testing and quarantine regulations obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. *Find out more: Federal Foreign Office.

    *Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.. And Latest information in German.

    *From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, citizens and family members (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    27.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: German government issues travel warnings for Ireland, Poland, Switzerland and most of Austria in attempt to curb spread of COVID-19 (Reuters, 22.10.2020). Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020) German authority warns against nonessential travel to France, Malta, Netherlands and Slovakia (Reuters, 15.10.2020). Authorities announce new restrictions in Berlin and Frankfurtas as COVID-19 cases surge (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Authorities announce Bars and restaurants are to close at 11:00pm local time (21:00 GMT) in Berlin until October 31 in a partial curfew, a measure already imposed in Frankfurt (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    From the EU: Entry restrictions: Entry from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.
    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.
    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.
    *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance , anyone having spent time in a risk area
    up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry.
    *Find out more at Federal Foreign Office.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at here Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Third Country: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.
    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.
    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.
    *Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).
    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    22.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Government orders lockdown of Berchtesgadener Land district in Bavaria for two weeks from 20 October (Reuters,19.10.2020) German authority warns against nonessential travel to France, Malta, Netherlands and Slovakia (Reuters, 15.10.2020). Authorities announce new restrictions in Berlin and Frankfurtas as COVID-19 cases surge (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Authorities announce Bars and restaurants are to close at 11:00pm local time (21:00 GMT) in Berlin until October 31 in a partial curfew, a measure already imposed in Frankfurt (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    From the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU+ countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly.
    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.
    *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance , anyone having spent time in a risk area
    up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry. *Find out more at Federal Foreign Office.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at here Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Third Country: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. *Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:
    their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    20.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: German authority warns against nonessential travel to France, Malta, Netherlands and Slovakia (Reuters, 15.10.2020). Authorities announce new restrictions in Berlin and Frankfurtas as COVID-19 cases surge (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Authorities announce Bars and restaurants are to close at 11:00pm local time (21:00 GMT) in Berlin until October 31 in a partial curfew, a measure already imposed in Frankfurt (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    From the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU+ countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino.
    A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.
    *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany- According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance , anyone having spent time in a risk area
    up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at here Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Third Country: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. *Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:
    their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    16.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities announce new restrictions in Berlin and Frankfurtas as COVID-19 cases surge (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Authorities announce Bars and restaurants are to close at 11:00pm local time (21:00 GMT) in Berlin until October 31 in a partial curfew, a measure already imposed in Frankfurt (Al Jazeera, 10.10.2020). Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020). Blanket travel warning lifted for countries outside European Union (Reuters, 30.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    A list of areas currently designated as presenting an increased risk of infection can be found in English on the Robert Koch Institute website. Travellers entering Germany from a designated risk area must enter quarantine for 14 days and take a COVID-19 test. They are also required to notify the local German health authority in their place of residence/accommodation. Northern Ireland, Scotland, North East England, North West England, the Midlands, Yorkshire and the Humber and Wales have been designated as high risk areas. If you have been in the designated high risk areas in the two weeks prior to their arrival in Germany, you are required to proceed directly to your accommodation and quarantine for 14 days or until you can show evidence of a negative test result. Those who can provide evidence of a negative test taken in a European Union member state or a state with comparable quality standards less than 48 hours prior to arrival may be exempted from the requirement to quarantine. Individual federal states are responsible for the implementation of quarantine regulations and local rules may vary.
    Entry into Germany from third countries (outside the EU/EEA and the UK): The rules for entering Germany from third countries concern travellers’ place of immediate prior stay, not their nationality. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel. The list of important reasons covers German and EU citizens and any third-country nationals with a right of residency in Germany. It also includes healthcare and social care personnel and health researchers, skilled workers whose economic activity is necessary and cannot be postponed or performed from abroad, freight and transport staff, seasonal workers, students who cannot continue their studies from abroad, travellers making visits for urgent family reasons, diplomats and staff at international organisations, and persons transiting Germany.


    From the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU+ countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany- According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance , anyone having spent time in a risk area
    up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at here Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Third Country: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. *Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:
    their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    14.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020). Blanket travel warning lifted for countries outside European Union (Reuters, 30.09.2020). German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:


    From the EU: Entry restrictions- Entry from EU+ countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available. More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany. *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany- According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance , anyone having spent time in a risk area
    up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately. More information is available at here Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    Third Country: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry. The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. *Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:
    their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided. The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    09.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Germany declares Georgia, Jordan, Romania and Tunisia to be COVID-19 risk regions (Reuters, 07.10.2020). Blanket travel warning lifted for countries outside European Union (Reuters, 30.09.2020). German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020).

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry from EU+ countries is allowed without restrictions, unless a country or region is defined as high risk area. The Robert Koch Institute provides a list of international risk areas, which is updated regularly. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last seven days. Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 14 days before entry, are obliged to self-isolate in accordance with the quarantine regulations and testing obligations of the competent Federal State. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.
    More information on travel restrictions and regulations for quarantine and COVID-19 tests are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. Also see the FAQ regarding corona testing and quarantine in Germany.
    *Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. As long as no negative test result is available, people are required to quarantine for 14 days upon entry. Find out more at Federal Foreign Office.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met:
    – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination;
    – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination);
    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.
    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany.
    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.
    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.
    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family.
    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship. Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.
    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    07.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Blanket travel warning lifted for countries outside European Union (Reuters, 30.09.2020). German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry restrictions: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. *Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. *Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests and Unmarried partners from third countries. To Find out more.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed. For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.
    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship here.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.
    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    02.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Blanket travel warning lifted for countries outside European Union (Reuters, 30.09.2020). German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry restrictions: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. *Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. *Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests and Unmarried partners from third countries. To Find out more.

    Transit: Third country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state, or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination, if the following conditions are met: – There are no reasonable direct routes to the country of destination; – The traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country; – The traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination); Under these conditions, third-country nationals may enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination. The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet conditions (1) and (2). To meet condition (3), the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination (or another transit country) certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. Such a document is necessary in particular if the third-country national does not meet the requirements for entering Germany but does meet the entry requirements of the country of destination (or, if applicable, of another transit country). Germany’s border control officials only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Germany lifted the restrictions on travel for residents of the following third countries: Australia, Canada, Georgia, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. This list will include Japan, South Korea, and China as soon as the possibility of mutual entry is confirmed.
    For all persons residing in a third country that is not included in the above list, the current restrictions on travel continue to apply. These persons may enter Germany only if there is an urgent need for their travel. Please see more information on what constitutes an urgent need for entry.
    The restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Also, EU+ citizens and members of their family (spouse, unmarried minor children, parents of minors) are exempted from the travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a longer-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country or the United Kingdom (residence permit or long-term visa) and the members of their family. Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previous shared residence in another country until recently. See declaration of the existence of the relationship here.
    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list: their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help). The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.
    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    01.10.2020
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry restrictions: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests and Unmarried partners from third countries. To Find out more…

    Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Allowed, with limitations.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The German government advises everyone to keep contact with others to a minimum and to adhere to hygiene and distancing rules. You are advised to carefully consider whether to hold any private gatherings, taking into account the potential risk of infection they may pose. Where possible gatherings should take place outdoors. Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German). Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    28.09.2020
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities warn against travel to some French regions, most of Czech Republic and Lisbon (23.09.2020, Reuters). Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry restrictions: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests and Unmarried partners from third countries. To Find out more…

    Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Allowed, with limitations.

    Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here. Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    23.09.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    Travel from EU: Entry restrictions: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests and Unmarried partners from third countries. To Find out more…

    Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    From Third Countries: Allowed, with limitations.

    Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here. Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    22.09.2020
  • Germany Latest News: Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:


    **Travelling from the EU: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries. *Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. *Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests; Unmarried partners from third countries. Find out more….

    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    **Third Countries: Travel is permitted, subject to limitations.

    Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here. Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    16.09.2020
  • Germany Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    ***From EU: Entry restrictions are available at the Federal Foreign Office website. List of affected countries.. **Travelling from (or returning to) Germany: According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days. Quarantine regulations and COVID-19 tests; Unmarried partners from third countries**Mandatory Travel Documentation: No special documentation is required. Find out more….

    ***Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    ***Third Countries: Travel is permitted, subject to limitations.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here. Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    14.09.2020
  • Germany Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    ***From the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions, as long as a country or an area is not defined as “high-risk” by the Robert Koch Insitute (RKI). Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is also allowed at the same conditions. Anyone who enters Germany having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their arrival is obliged to proceed directly to their own home or another suitable accommodation and self-isolate there for 14 days. This does not apply if the person only travelled through a risk area without spending time there.
    According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. The test must be carried out in a Member State of the European Union or a country that is listed by the Robert Koch Institute. If, when entering Germany, you already carry with you a test result, to be valid the test may not have been conducted more than 48 hours prior to entry. The test certificate must be written in German or English. People returning from risk areas and non-risk areas can receive a free test. Since 1 August, the costs incurred are covered if the test is performed within 72 hours of entering the country. The costs incurred for one repeat test per person are also covered. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days.

    ***Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly. More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    ***Third Countries: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas . Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel. ***Specific measures for German residents exiting or returning to Germany Individual countries can continue to restrict entry or ask for quarantine upon entry on their territory. Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here. Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    11.09.2020
  • Germany Ban on nonessential travel to countries outside EU will be lifted, replaced with detailed travel advice for each country on 1 October (The Local Germany, 09.09.2020). Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions, as long as a country or an area is not defined as “high-risk” by the Robert Koch Insitute (RKI). Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is also allowed at the same conditions, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. Anyone who enters Germany having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days. before their arrival is obliged to proceed directly to their own home or another suitable accommodation and self-isolate there for 14 days. This does not apply if the person only travelled through a risk area without spending time there.
    According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance, anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany.
    The test must be carried out in a Member State of the European Union or a country that is listed. by the Robert Koch Institute. If, when entering Germany, you already carry with you a test result, to be valid the test may not have been conducted more than 48 hours prior to entry. The test certificate must be written in German or English. People returning from risk areas and non-risk areas can receive a free test. Since 1 August, the costs incurred are covered if the test is performed within 72 hours of entering the country. The costs incurred for one repeat test per person are also covered. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days.

    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly. More information is available here .

    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html>risk areas. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance here .
    Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    07.09.2020
  • Germany Government extends travel warning for non-European countries until 14 September (Reuters, 26.08.2020). Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions, as long as a country or an area is not defined as “high-risk” by the Robert Koch Insitute (RKI) [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is also allowed at the same conditions. Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany. [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html] Anyone who enters Germany having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their arrival is obliged to proceed directly to their own home or another suitable accommodation and self-isolate there for 14 days. This does not apply if the person only travelled through a risk area without spending time there.
    According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Transport/Anordnung_Testpflicht_en.html], anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. The test must be carried out in a Member State of the European Union [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Tests.html] or a country that is listed by the Robert Koch Institute. If, when entering Germany, you already carry with you a test result, to be valid the test may not have been conducted more than 48 hours prior to entry. The test certificate must be written in German or English. People returning from risk areas and non-risk areas can receive a free test. Since 1 August, the costs incurred are covered if the test is performed within 72 hours of entering the country. The costs incurred for one repeat test per person are also covered. ^^Rules and Exceptions
    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days.

    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268]

    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel. Individual countries can continue to restrict entry or ask for quarantine upon entry on their territory.
    Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    28.08.2020
  • Germany Authorities issue warning against travel to parts of Croatia, Romania; travel warning for Luxembourg lifted (Reuters, 20.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions, as long as a country or an area is not defined as “high-risk” by the Robert Koch Insitute (RKI). Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is also allowed at the same conditions.
    Currently, the following countries or areas are classified as “high-risk”: Belgium: Province of Antwerp (since 5/8/20) Bulgaria: Districts (“oblasts”) of Blagoevgrad, Dobritch, Varna(since 7/8/20) Romania: Districts of Argeș, Bihor, Buzău, Neamt – Districts of Bacu, Brsila, Brasov, D’mbovica, Galai, Gorj, Ilfov, Prahova, Vaslui, Vrancea and the metropolitan region of the capital Bucharest (since 12/8/20) Croatia: Counties of Šibensko-kninska and Splitsko-Dalmatinska (since 20/8/20) Spain: Mainland Spain and the Balearic Islands (since 14/8/20). Anyone who enters Germany having spent time in a risk area [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html] up to 14 days before their arrival is obliged to proceed directly to their own home or another suitable accommodation and self-isolate there for 14 days. This does not apply if the person only travelled through a risk area without spending time there. According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Transport/Anordnung_Testpflicht_en.html] anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. The test must be carried out in a Member State of the European Union or a country that is listed by the Robert Koch Institute [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Tests.html] If, when entering Germany, you already carry with you a test result, to be valid the test may not have been conducted more than 48 hours prior to entry. The test certificate must be written in German or English.
    People returning from risk areas and non-risk areas can receive a free test. Since 1 August, the costs incurred are covered if the test is performed within 72 hours of entering the country. The costs incurred for one repeat test per person are also covered. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days.

    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268]

    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel. **Specific measures for German residents exiting or returning to Germany: Individual countries can continue to restrict entry or ask for quarantine upon entry on their territory. Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel [The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel.]

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

    Read more
    24.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel warning for parts of Bulgaria and Romania because of regional spikes in coronavirus cases.Travelers returning to Germany from those areas must undergo a compulsory coronavirus test.(Star Tribune, 08.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions, as long as a country or an area is not defined as “high-risk” [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html] by the Robert Koch Insitute (RKI). Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is also allowed at the same conditions. Currently, the following countries or areas are classified as “high-risk”: Belgium: Province of Antwerp (since 5/8/20) Bulgaria: Districts (“oblasts”) of Blagoevgrad, Dobritch, Varna(since 7/8/20) Luxembourg (since 14/7/20)
    Romania: Districts of Argeș, Bihor, Buzău, Neamt, Ialomita, Mehedinti, Timis (since 7/8/20) – Districts of Bacu, Brsila, Brasov, D’mbovica, Galai, Gorj, Ilfov, Prahova, Vaslui, Vrancea and the metropolitan region of the capital Bucharest (since 12/8/20) Spain: Mainland Spain and the Balearic Islands (since 14/8/20)
    Travelling from Germany or returning to Germany. Anyone who enters Germany having spent time in a risk area [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html] up to 14 days before their arrival is obliged to proceed directly to their own home or another suitable accommodation and self-isolate there for 14 days. This does not apply if the person only travelled through a risk area without spending time there. According to the Federal Ministry of Health’s Testing Obligation Ordinance https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Transport/Anordnung_Testpflicht_en.html] anyone having spent time in a risk area up to 14 days before their entry into Germany, if requested by the competent health office or a different authority designated, must either provide proof of having tested negative for SARS-CoV-2 or get tested within 14 days of their entry into Germany. The test must be carried out in a Member State of the European Union or a country that is listed by the Robert Koch Institute [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Tests.html] If, when entering Germany, you already carry with you a test result, to be valid the test may not have been conducted more than 48 hours prior to entry. The test certificate must be written in German or English. People returning from risk areas and non-risk areas can receive a free test. Since 1 August, the costs incurred are covered if the test is performed within 72 hours of entering the country. The costs incurred for one repeat test per person are also covered.**Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. A country or an area is defined as “high-risk” when there are more than 50 new infections per 100,000 people over the last period of seven days.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly. More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by Robert Koch Inst [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html] Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] Further restrictions vary by region, so you should follow the latest local guidance, much of which is available in English.

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    18.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel warning for parts of Bulgaria and Romania because of regional spikes in coronavirus cases.Travelers returning to Germany from those areas must undergo a compulsory coronavirus test.(Star Tribune, 08.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: There are now no general COVID-19-related restrictions on entry into Germany from elsewhere in the EU, the UK, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway. Entry restrictions and heightened checks on Germany’s borders for those arriving by land or air from these countries expired on 15 June. For Spain, the restrictions on entry (by air) were lifted on 21 June.
    People entering from other EU countries, the Schengen area and the UK will only have to go into quarantine if they are entering from an area where there is a high rate of infection. Travellers should consult local federal state and health authority guidance for specific arrangements: [https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/topics/civil-protection/coronavirus/coronavirus-faqs.html#doc13797140bodyText3]. Since 8 August travellers entering Germany after staying in a designated risk area abroad during the previous 14 days must undergo mandatory testing for Covid-19. The German government regularly updates its list of designated risk areas. If you’re travelling to Germany and have been in a designated risk area, there are three choices. You can: present a valid test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival; take a test directly on arrival – there are facilities to provide such testing operating at airports and major transport hubs; or take a test after your return to your place of residence in Germany, where you are required to report to the local health office. The test is free of charge if taken within 72 hours of arrival.
    A negative test may exempt you from the 14-day self-isolation requirement, but you should note that some German states require a second negative test before granting an exemption from quarantine.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: On 2 July Germany lifted restrictions on entry for travellers coming from the following countries: Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. Restrictions will also be lifted for entry from South Korea, China and Japan if this can be agreed on a reciprocal basis. Currently Germany has not yet lifted restrictions on entry from Serbia, Morocco, Algeria and Rwanda, on the basis of infection data provided by its own public health institute, although these four countries were included on the European Commission list. The list will be reviewed every two weeks. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    14.08.2020
  • Germany German authority issues travel warning for Madrid because of COVID-19. (Reuters, 11.08.2020)
    Germany’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel warning for parts of Bulgaria and Romania because of regional spikes in coronavirus cases.Travelers returning to Germany from those areas must undergo a compulsory coronavirus test.(Star Tribune, 08.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: There are now no general COVID-19-related restrictions on entry into Germany from elsewhere in the EU, the UK, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway. Entry restrictions and heightened checks on Germany’s borders for those arriving by land or air from these countries expired on 15 June. For Spain, the restrictions on entry (by air) were lifted on 21 June.
    People entering from other EU countries, the Schengen area and the UK will only have to go into quarantine if they are entering from an area where there is a high rate of infection. Travellers should consult local federal state and health authority guidance for specific arrangements: [https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/topics/civil-protection/coronavirus/coronavirus-faqs.html#doc13797140bodyText3]. Since 8 August travellers entering Germany after staying in a designated risk area abroad during the previous 14 days must undergo mandatory testing for Covid-19. The German government regularly updates its list of designated risk areas. If you’re travelling to Germany and have been in a designated risk area, there are three choices. You can: present a valid test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival; take a test directly on arrival – there are facilities to provide such testing operating at airports and major transport hubs; or take a test after your return to your place of residence in Germany, where you are required to report to the local health office. The test is free of charge if taken within 72 hours of arrival.
    A negative test may exempt you from the 14-day self-isolation requirement, but you should note that some German states require a second negative test before granting an exemption from quarantine.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: On 2 July Germany lifted restrictions on entry for travellers coming from the following countries: Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. Restrictions will also be lifted for entry from South Korea, China and Japan if this can be agreed on a reciprocal basis. Currently Germany has not yet lifted restrictions on entry from Serbia, Morocco, Algeria and Rwanda, on the basis of infection data provided by its own public health institute, although these four countries were included on the European Commission list. The list will be reviewed every two weeks. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    11.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel warning for parts of Bulgaria and Romania because of regional spikes in coronavirus cases.Travelers returning to Germany from those areas must undergo a compulsory coronavirus test.(Star Tribune, 08.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: There are now no general COVID-19-related restrictions on entry into Germany from elsewhere in the EU, the UK, Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway. Entry restrictions and heightened checks on Germany’s borders for those arriving by land or air from these countries expired on 15 June. For Spain, the restrictions on entry (by air) were lifted on 21 June.
    People entering from other EU countries, the Schengen area and the UK will only have to go into quarantine if they are entering from an area where there is a high rate of infection. Travellers should consult local federal state and health authority guidance for specific arrangements: [https://www.bmi.bund.de/SharedDocs/faqs/EN/topics/civil-protection/coronavirus/coronavirus-faqs.html#doc13797140bodyText3]. Since 8 August travellers entering Germany after staying in a designated risk area abroad during the previous 14 days must undergo mandatory testing for Covid-19. The German government regularly updates its list of designated risk areas. If you’re travelling to Germany and have been in a designated risk area, there are three choices. You can: present a valid test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival; take a test directly on arrival – there are facilities to provide such testing operating at airports and major transport hubs; or take a test after your return to your place of residence in Germany, where you are required to report to the local health office. The test is free of charge if taken within 72 hours of arrival.
    A negative test may exempt you from the 14-day self-isolation requirement, but you should note that some German states require a second negative test before granting an exemption from quarantine.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: On 2 July Germany lifted restrictions on entry for travellers coming from the following countries: Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. Restrictions will also be lifted for entry from South Korea, China and Japan if this can be agreed on a reciprocal basis. Currently Germany has not yet lifted restrictions on entry from Serbia, Morocco, Algeria and Rwanda, on the basis of infection data provided by its own public health institute, although these four countries were included on the European Commission list. The list will be reviewed every two weeks. Entry from any third country is possible for travellers who can demonstrate an important reason for their travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    10.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s Foreign Ministry has issued a travel warning for parts of Bulgaria and Romania because of regional spikes in coronavirus cases.Travelers returning to Germany from those areas must undergo a compulsory coronavirus test.(Star Tribune, 08.08.2020) Germany announces mandatory tests for travellers returning from high-risk regions (Reuters, 06.08.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is allowed without restrictions. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. This currently also applies to Luxembourg and to some areas in Spain. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.
    Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    08.08.2020
  • Germany Germany announces mandatory tests for travellers returning from high-risk regions (Reuters, 06.08.2020). German authority warns against all nonessential travel to Antwerp (Reuters, 05.08.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is allowed without restrictions. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. This currently also applies to Luxembourg and to some areas in Spain. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.
    Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel.
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: Travelling to and from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay is allowed without restrictions. For China, Japan and South Korea a lifting of entry restrictions is subject to confirmation of reciprocity. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. **Rules and Exceptions: The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality. Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    07.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s federal and regional governments on Thursday 16 July agreed on tougher, more targeted lockdown measures to contain local outbreaks and ward off the threat of a second coronavirus wave. (Yahoo News,16.07.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein as well as the United Kingdom is allowed without restrictions. If a country exceeds the number of new cases in relation to the population of 50 cases per 100,000 inhabitants cumulatively in the last seven days, travel warnings are issued. This currently also applies to Luxembourg and to some areas in Spain. Rules and Exceptions: The place of departure is decisive in regard to whether it is possible to enter Germany, not the nationality of the person wishing to enter.
    Regardless of the possibility to enter the country, Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas [https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Risikogebiete_neu.html]. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) to travellers with an important reason for travel. Mandatory Travel Documentation: No special documentation is required. Specific measures for German residents exiting or returning to Germany. Individual countries can continue to restrict entry or ask for quarantine upon entry on their territory. Germany has a quarantine requirement in place in all federal states on the basis of the Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz) for those returning to and entering Germany from regions designated by the Robert Koch Institute as risk areas. The quarantine requirement also applies (with the exception of transit passengers) for travellers with an important reason for travel. A travel warning is currently issued for Luxembourg and some areas in Spain
    More info: [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: As above.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    03.08.2020
  • Germany Germany’s federal and regional governments on Thursday 16 July agreed on tougher, more targeted lockdown measures to contain local outbreaks and ward off the threat of a second coronavirus wave. (Yahoo News,16.07.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. Travellers should check the website of the federal state they are entering for specific rules applicable locally. More info: [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly. More info: [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Third Country Nationals: Current Restrictions to third-country nationals are implemented (with few national derogations) in line with the Council Recommendation on the temporary restriction on non-essential travel into the EU and the possible lifting of such restriction [Council document 9208/20] since 2/07/2020. The adjustments made by the Council on 16/07/2020 [Council document 9596/20] have been taken into account. Travellers from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay can enter without restrictions from 2/07/2020. This will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China – but only if these countries also allow people from Germany to enter. The states mentioned are summarized in the so-called “positive list” [https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html].
    To determine the possibility of entry, the previous location of the traveller is taken in consideration (instead of nationality). Regardless of the entry options in Germany, all federal states have a quarantine obligation under the Infection Protection Act for arriving and returning travellers from risk areas specified by the RKI. With the exception of passengers in transit, this also applies, in principle, to travellers with an important travel reason. Travellers with a medical certificate that demonstrates that there are no signs of infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus are exempted from the quarantine requirement. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another country published by the Robert Koch Institute at https://www.rki.de/covid-19-tests, in German or English, and must not be older than 48 hours at the time of entry.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    30.07.2020
  • Germany Germany’s federal and regional governments on Thursday 16 July agreed on tougher, more targeted lockdown measures to contain local outbreaks and ward off the threat of a second coronavirus wave. (Yahoo News,16.07.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. Travellers should check the website of the federal state they are entering for specific rules applicable locally.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Transit: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. Risk areas are those with a 7-day incidence greater than 50 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions [https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/coronavirus/2317268].
    **Third Country Nationals: Current Restrictions to third-country nationals are implemented (with few national derogations) in line with the Council Recommendation on the temporary restriction on non-essential travel into the EU and the possible lifting of such restriction [Council document 9208/20] since 2/07/2020. The adjustments made by the Council on 16/07/2020 [Council document 9596/20] have been taken into account. Travellers from Australia, Georgia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay can enter without restrictions from 2/07/2020. This will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China – but only if these countries also allow people from Germany to enter. The states mentioned are summarized in the so-called “positive list” [https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html].
    To determine the possibility of entry, the previous location of the traveller is taken in consideration (instead of nationality). Regardless of the entry options in Germany, all federal states have a quarantine obligation under the Infection Protection Act for arriving and returning travellers from risk areas specified by the RKI. With the exception of passengers in transit, this also applies, in principle, to travellers with an important travel reason. Travellers with a medical certificate that demonstrates that there are no signs of infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus are exempted from the quarantine requirement. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another country published by the Robert Koch Institute at https://www.rki.de/covid-19-tests, in German or English, and must not be older than 48 hours at the time of entry.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    27.07.2020
  • Germany Germany revokes quarantine requirement for Swedish travellers. (The Local, 14.07.2020) Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    **From EU: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. If the state has issued quarantine instructions to travellers from high-risk countries, travellers must isolate themselves, contact the local health authority, and notify it of their entry in Germany. This currently applies to travellers arriving from Sweden. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. Travellers should check the website of the federal state they are entering for specific rules applicable locally.
    **Transit: A two-week quarantine is mandatory when entering from high-risk areas; there is also an obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    **Third Country Nationals: Travellers from Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay can enter without restrictions from July 2nd. This will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China – but only if these countries also allow people from Germany to enter. The states mentioned are summarized in the so-called “positive list” [https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html]. To determine the possibility of entry, the previous location of the traveller is taken in consideration (instead of nationality). Regardless of the entry options in Germany, all federal states have a quarantine obligation under the Infection Protection Act for arriving and returning travellers from risk areas specified by the RKI. With the exception of passengers in transit, this also applies, in principle, to travellers with an important travel reason. Travellers with a medical certificate that demonstrates that there are no signs of infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus are exempted from the quarantine requirement. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another country published by the Robert Koch Institute at https://www.rki.de/covid-19-tests, in German or English, and must not be older than 48 hours at the time of entry.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Movement throughout the country is allowed. There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops re-opened from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resumed from 15 May behind closed doors
    re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions; Wearing a face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state: check the latest local guidance (in German) [https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    15.07.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    From EU: For travellers arriving from a country that is classified as a risk area according to the Robert Koch Institute website, a mandatory 14-day quarantine applies in almost all federal states. If the state has issued quarantine instructions to travellers from high-risk countries, travellers must isolate themselves, contact the local health authority, and notify it of their entry in Germany. This currently applies to travellers arriving from Sweden. The federal states issue the quarantine obligation under their own responsibility. Travellers should check the website of the federal state they are entering for specific rules applicable locally.
    Transit: A two-week quarantine is mandatory when entering from high-risk areas; there is also an obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be dispensed with if travellers have a medical certificate that confirms that there is no evidence of an infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another state published by the Robert Koch Institute and must not be older than 48 hours upon arrival. Proof must be provided when entering Germany. However, there is an exception for travellers who only cross the country, if they leave Germany directly.
    Third Country Nationals: Travellers from Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay can enter without restrictions from July 2nd. This will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China – but only if these countries also allow people from Germany to enter. The states mentioned are summarized in the so-called “positive list”.
    To determine the possibility of entry, the previous location of the traveller is taken in consideration (instead of nationality). Regardless of the entry options in Germany, all federal states have a quarantine obligation under the Infection Protection Act for arriving and returning travellers from risk areas specified by the RKI. With the exception of passengers in transit, this also applies, in principle, to travellers with an important travel reason. Travellers with a medical certificate that demonstrates that there are no signs of infection with the SARSCoV-2 coronavirus are exempted from the quarantine requirement. The medical certificate must come from a member state of the European Union or another country published by the Robert Koch Institute at https://www.rki.de/covid-19-tests, in German or English, and must not be older than 48 hours at the time of entry.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] .The western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) said on Monday 26 June that as a precaution it would extend by one week. A lockdown in the neighbouring district of Warendorf will be lifted on Tuesday 30 June.

    Read more
    13.07.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    From and EU Schegen State: Note that, for travellers entering from a country, which is qualified a risk area according to the website of the Robert Koch-Institut, in almost all federal states a compulsory 14 day quarantine applies. If the respective federal state has issued an ordninance for travelers from risk countries, travellers need to self-quarantine, contact the local health authority and inform the latter of their entry. This is currently the case for travellers entering from Sweden.
    Transit Travellers: When entering Germany from areas of high risk, a two-week quarantine is mandatory; in addition, there is the obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be waived if the result of a recent PCR test has been negative; proof thereof has to be provided when entering Germany.However, there is an exception for travelers only transiting the country if and when they leave Germany directly.
    For third country nationals, Travellers from Australia, Georgia, Canada, Montenegro, New Zealand, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay will be able to enter without restrictions from 2 July. That will also apply to Japan, South Korea and China — but only if those countries also allow people from Germany to enter.
    For the determination of the entry possibility, the previous location of the travelers is decisive, not their nationality. Regardless of the entry options in Germany, a quarantine obligation based on the Infection Protection Act applies in all federal states for incoming and returning travelers from the risk areas specified by the RKI. With the exception of passengers in transit traffic, this also applies in principle to travelers with an important travel reason. An exception to the quarantine applies to the current negative test. The most important goal of all considerations remains to secure the further containment of the pandemic.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] .The western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) said on Monday 26 June that as a precaution it would extend by one week. A lockdown in the neighbouring district of Warendorf will be lifted on Tuesday 30 June.

    Read more
    07.07.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    From and EU Schegen State: Note that, for travellers entering from a country, which is qualified a risk area according to the website of the Robert Koch-Institut, in almost all federal states a compulsory 14 day quarantine applies. If the respective federal state has issued an ordninance for travelers from risk countries, travellers need to self-quarantine, contact the local health authority and inform the latter of their entry. This is currently the case for travellers entering from Sweden.
    Transit Travellers: When entering Germany from areas of high risk, a two-week quarantine is mandatory; in addition, there is the obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be waived if the result of a recent PCR test has been negative; proof thereof has to be provided when entering Germany.However, there is an exception for travelers only transiting the country if and when they leave Germany directly.
    For third country nationals, as from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198] .The western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) said on Monday 26 June that as a precaution it would extend by one week. A lockdown in the neighbouring district of Warendorf will be lifted on Tuesday 30 June.

    Read more
    02.07.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    From and EU Schegen State: Note that, for travellers entering from a country, which is qualified a risk area according to the website of the Robert Koch-Institut, in almost all federal states a compulsory 14 day quarantine applies. If the respective federal state has issued an ordninance for travelers from risk countries, travellers need to self-quarantine, contact the local health authority and inform the latter of their entry. This is currently the case for travellers entering from Sweden.
    Transit Travellers: When entering Germany from areas of high risk, a two-week quarantine is mandatory; in addition, there is the obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be waived if the result of a recent PCR test has been negative; proof thereof has to be provided when entering Germany.However, there is an exception for travelers only transiting the country if and when they leave Germany directly.
    For third country nationals, as from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]
    The western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) said on Monday 26 June that as a precaution it would extend by one week. A lockdown in the neighbouring district of Warendorf will be lifted on Tuesday 30 June.

    Read more
    01.07.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    Travel restrictions for 31 European countries, including EU Member States, are lifted and replaced by individual travel recommendations.
    Companies that provide international air travel to the Federal Republic of Germany must store the passenger data in their possession after arrival in the Federal Republic of Germany up to 30 days; this applies in particular to electronically stored data for identification and accessibility of passengers and for passenger lists and seating plans.
    Transit: When entering Germany from areas of high risk, a two-week quarantine is mandatory; in addition, there is the obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be waived if the result of a recent PCR test has been negative; proof thereof has to be provided when entering Germany.
    Current Restrictions to third-country nationals coming from outside the EU /EEA remain in effect until 30th June 2020; ongoing consultations between EU-Commission and Member States on the future development of restrictions on admission to the EU from 1st July 2020.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]
    The western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) said on Monday 26 June that as a precaution it would extend by one week. A lockdown in the neighbouring district of Warendorf will be lifted on Tuesday 30 June.

    Read more
    29.06.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    *****International Restrictions:
    Travel restrictions for 31 European countries, including EU Member States, are lifted and replaced by individual travel recommendations.
    Companies that provide international air travel to the Federal Republic of Germany must store the passenger data in their possession after arrival in the Federal Republic of Germany up to 30 days; this applies in particular to electronically stored data for identification and accessibility of passengers and for passenger lists and seating plans.
    Transit: When entering Germany from areas of high risk, a two-week quarantine is mandatory; in addition, there is the obligation to report to the health authority. This measure can only be waived if the result of a recent PCR test has been negative; proof thereof has to be provided when entering Germany.
    Current Restrictions to third-country nationals coming from outside the EU /EEA remain in effect until 30th June 2020; ongoing consultations between EU-Commission and Member States on the future development of restrictions on admission to the EU from 1st July 2020.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    27.06.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom;
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a “D” Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – British nationals and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to another Schengen Member State.
    – This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    – This does not apply to British nationals.
    – This does not apply to family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    – This does not apply to family members of British nationals.
    – This does not apply to residents of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    3. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2 .
    4. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.

    Third Countries: Entry regulations from third countries:In order to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, the European Commission has recommended that the travel restrictions already in place for all non-essential travel to the EU from third countries be extended until 30 June 2020. Germany will implement this recommendation. The following persons shall continue to be exempt from these travel restrictions: Nationals from EU countries, countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), the UK, and their respective family members returning to their place of residence. Third-country nationals with a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State and/or the countries mentioned above (residence permit or long-term visa, e.g. for study or work purposes), provided that they are returning to their place of habitual residence. Third-country nationals with essential functions or needs.
    Travels within the EU: On 10 June 2020, the Federal Government decided to end the internal border controls with Austria, Switzerland, France, Italy and Denmark, which had been temporarily reintroduced due to the pandemic, as of 15 June 2020. Airside internal border controls with Spain will cease on 21 June 2020. This means that, from 16 June 2020 or (in the case of Spain) from 22 June 2020, a valid reason for entry is no longer required for entry into Germany from the above-mentioned countries. Border controls at the border with Luxembourg ceased on 15 May 2020.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    24.06.2020
  • Germany Second district in North Rhine-Westphalia put under lockdown (Reuters, 23.06.2020). From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom;
    – effective 22 June 2020, passengers arriving from Spain;
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2 .
    3. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    *****International restrictions
    Third Countries: Entry regulations from third countries:In order to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, the European Commission has recommended that the travel restrictions already in place for all non-essential travel to the EU from third countries be extended until 30 June 2020. Germany will implement this recommendation. The following persons shall continue to be exempt from these travel restrictions: Nationals from EU countries, countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), the UK, and their respective family members returning to their place of residence. Third-country nationals with a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State and/or the countries mentioned above (residence permit or long-term visa, e.g. for study or work purposes), provided that they are returning to their place of habitual residence. Third-country nationals with essential functions or needs.
    Travels within the EU: On 10 June 2020, the Federal Government decided to end the internal border controls with Austria, Switzerland, France, Italy and Denmark, which had been temporarily reintroduced due to the pandemic, as of 15 June 2020. Airside internal border controls with Spain will cease on 21 June 2020. This means that, from 16 June 2020 or (in the case of Spain) from 22 June 2020, a valid reason for entry is no longer required for entry into Germany from the above-mentioned countries. Border controls at the border with Luxembourg ceased on 15 May 2020.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    23.06.2020
  • Germany From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom;
    – effective 22 June 2020, passengers arriving from Spain;
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2 .
    3. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    *****International restrictions
    Third Countries: Entry regulations from third countries:In order to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, the European Commission has recommended that the travel restrictions already in place for all non-essential travel to the EU from third countries be extended until 30 June 2020. Germany will implement this recommendation. The following persons shall continue to be exempt from these travel restrictions: Nationals from EU countries, countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), the UK, and their respective family members returning to their place of residence. Third-country nationals with a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State and/or the countries mentioned above (residence permit or long-term visa, e.g. for study or work purposes), provided that they are returning to their place of habitual residence. Third-country nationals with essential functions or needs.
    Travels within the EU: On 10 June 2020, the Federal Government decided to end the internal border controls with Austria, Switzerland, France, Italy and Denmark, which had been temporarily reintroduced due to the pandemic, as of 15 June 2020. Airside internal border controls with Spain will cease on 21 June 2020. This means that, from 16 June 2020 or (in the case of Spain) from 22 June 2020, a valid reason for entry is no longer required for entry into Germany from the above-mentioned countries. Border controls at the border with Luxembourg ceased on 15 May 2020.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    21.06.2020
  • Germany In order to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, the European Commission has recommended that the travel restrictions already in place for all non-essential travel to the EU from third countries be extended until 30 June 2020. Germany will implement this recommendation.

    The following persons shall continue to be exempt from these travel restrictions:
    Nationals from EU countries, countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), the UK, and their respective family members returning to their place of residenceThird-country nationals with a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State and/or the countries mentioned above (residence permit or long-term visa, e.g. for study or work purposes), provided that they are returning to their place of habitual residenceThird-country nationals with essential functions or needs, including:healthcare workers, health researchers and care professionalscross-border workers, transport personnel employed in the movement of goods and other essential sectorsdiplomats, staff of international organisations, military personnel and humanitarian aid workers insofar as they are performing official dutiespassengers in transitpassengers travelling for imperative family reasonspersons in need of international protection or seeking entry for other humanitarian reasons.From 1 July 2020, the exceptions to the EU entry restrictions are to be extended as follows:

    EU citizens, citizens from countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), citizens from the UK and third-country nationals entitled to reside in the EU and their respective family members shall be allowed to enter the country, regardless of whether they are returning to their place of residence.

    The categories for third-country nationals with so-called “essential functions or needs” are to be extended by including:

    third-country nationals entering for the purpose of studyqualified professionals from third countries provided that their employment is necessary from an economic point of view and that their work cannot be postponed or carried out from abroad.

    Read more
    19.06.2020
  • Germany From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom;
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2 .
    3. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    *****International restrictions
    Third Countries: Entry regulations from third countries:In order to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, the European Commission has recommended that the travel restrictions already in place for all non-essential travel to the EU from third countries be extended until 30 June 2020. Germany will implement this recommendation. The following persons shall continue to be exempt from these travel restrictions: Nationals from EU countries, countries associated with Schengen (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), the UK, and their respective family members returning to their place of residence. Third-country nationals with a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State and/or the countries mentioned above (residence permit or long-term visa, e.g. for study or work purposes), provided that they are returning to their place of habitual residence. Third-country nationals with essential functions or needs.
    Travels within the EU: On 10 June 2020, the Federal Government decided to end the internal border controls with Austria, Switzerland, France, Italy and Denmark, which had been temporarily reintroduced due to the pandemic, as of 15 June 2020. Airside internal border controls with Spain will cease on 21 June 2020. This means that, from 16 June 2020 or (in the case of Spain) from 22 June 2020, a valid reason for entry is no longer required for entry into Germany from the above-mentioned countries. Border controls at the border with Luxembourg ceased on 15 May 2020.
    Quarantine regulations: The Federation and the Länder have agreed on the main aspects of uniform quarantine regulations for people entering or returning to Germany. Further information, the model ordinance and links are available on the websites of the Federal Ministry of the Interior [https://www.bmi.bund.de/EN/home/home_node.html], For information on the concrete implementation of the measures in the various Länder, please see the websites of the Land Ministries of Health. Travelers should also expect more scrutiny during checks, as more comprehensive questions may be posed and health checks performed in doubtful cases. Measures may also be adjusted when necessary.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    There are nationwide rules in place restricting movement and limiting activity: one household can meet another outside; schools are gradually re-opening with social distancing, hygiene plans and increased digital learning in place; hospitals and care homes that have no active COVID-19 cases can now start developing plans for receiving visitors again; home working is still recommended wherever possible; shops can re-open from 11 May, subject to limits on the number of customers per square metre; outdoor non-contact sports are permitted, with the Bundesliga resuming from 15 May behind closed doors; re-opening of restaurants, hotels, theatres, cinemas, bars, trade fairs and other facilities will differ from region to region, reflecting local conditions. The wearing of face masks is required in certain public areas in all of Germany’s 16 states. The rules vary from state to state -[https://www.bundesregierung.de/breg-de/themen/coronavirus/corona-bundeslaender-1745198]

    Read more
    17.06.2020
  • Germany From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom;
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2
    3. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020)

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, Hamburg and North Rhine Westphalia states from EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask. Until further notice.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays at hotels are permitted for work-related travel. Most states permit hotel stays for tourists as well. The last remaining states prohibiting tourist stays will revoke the ban by 28 May. Major events are prohibited. Pubs and restaurants reopened with 50% capacity. Beer gardens reopened with controlled health regulations in place.

    Read more
    15.06.2020
  • Germany From 15 June, warning against tourist travel will be lifted for EU countries, the warning to remain in place for countries outside the EU until 31 August (The Local, 10.06.2020). Germany continues to advise against travel to Britain because of quarantine requirement (Reuters, 10.06.2020).

    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2
    3. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.
    – This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020)

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, Hamburg and North Rhine Westphalia states from EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask. Until further notice.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays at hotels are permitted for work-related travel. Most states permit hotel stays for tourists as well. The last remaining states prohibiting tourist stays will revoke the ban by 28 May. Major events are prohibited. Pubs and restaurants reopened with 50% capacity. Beer gardens reopened with controlled health regulations in place.

    Read more
    11.06.2020
  • Germany From June 15th, the warning against tourist travel put in place by the German government to stall the spread of coronavirus will be lifted for EU countries. However, the warning is expected to stay in place for countries outside the EU until August 31st. (The Local, 10.06.2020)

    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2
    3. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020)

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, Hamburg and North Rhine Westphalia states from EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask. Until further notice.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays at hotels are permitted for work-related travel. Most states permit hotel stays for tourists as well. The last remaining states prohibiting tourist stays will revoke the ban by 28 May. Major events are prohibited. Pubs and restaurants reopened with 50% capacity. Beer gardens reopened with controlled health regulations in place.

    Read more
    10.06.2020
  • Germany Germany will lift a warning against travel to 26 fellow EU countries from June 15. The German cabinet is expected to formally approve the relaxed travel guidelines for EU countries next week. (Reuters, 27.05.2020)

    Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020)

    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter.
    This does not apply to:
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany;
    – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – nationals of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with a British passport and their family members returning via Germany to their country of residence;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2
    3. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, Hamburg and North Rhine Westphalia states from EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask. Until further notice.

    Internal Restrictions
    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays at hotels are permitted for work-related travel. Most states permit hotel stays for tourists as well. The last remaining states prohibiting tourist stays will revoke the ban by 28 May. Major events are prohibited. Until 31/08/2020. Pubs and restaurants reopened with 50% capacity. Beer gardens reopened with controlled health regulations in place. Until further notice

    Read more
    03.06.2020
  • Germany Germany will lift a warning against travel to 26 fellow EU countries from June 15. The German cabinet is expected to formally approve the relaxed travel guidelines for EU countries next week. (Reuters, 27.05.2020) Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020) 1.Passengers are not allowed to enter Germany. This does not apply to: – nationals of Germany; – passengers with a residence permit issued by Germany; – passengers with a D-Visa issued by Germany; – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany; – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists; – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved; – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members; – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation. 2. For more information, please refer to the website https://www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html;jsessionid=97A3BB54ABD2E6A6A7D1D39F30BEC55C.2_cid324?nn=5931604#doc13824392bodyText2 3. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days. – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony, Hamburg and North Rhine Westphalia states from EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask. Until further notice. Internal Restrictions Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays at hotels are permitted for work-related travel. Most states permit hotel stays for tourists as well. The last remaining states prohibiting tourist stays will revoke the ban by 28 May. Major events are prohibited. Until 31/08/2020. Pubs and restaurants reopened with 50% capacity. Beer gardens reopened with controlled health regulations in place. Until further notice

    Read more
    28.05.2020
  • Germany Berlin’s busiest airport will close on June 15 for at least two months, though authorities say the closure may be permanent. All flight traffic will be handled by Berlin Schonefeld Airport. (DW, 20.05.2020)

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form. Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony and North Rhine Westphalia states. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports, where medical teams have been posted. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, including on the route linking Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In public, at least 1,5m distance must be maintained except between members of the same household. Relaxation of restrictions On 6 May the federal government handed authority for relaxing restrictions over to state governments. A partial relaxation of restrictions involves: Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. From 15 June softer guidelines for travel abroad could be issued depending on coronavirus infections. (Reuters, 18.05.2020)

    Read more
    21.05.2020
  • Germany

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form. Spouses and registered partners. Travel to Austria and Switzerland is authorised for visiting life partners, relatives, attending family events or tending to agricultural areas. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Currently, most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. This does not apply for travellers arriving in Bavaria, Lower Saxony and North Rhine Westphalia states. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website. Pending approval, travellers arriving from EU/EEA member states and the UK will be exempt from quarantine requirements. In the future, the quarantine requirement will depend on the state of outbreak at the point of departure. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports, where medical teams have been posted. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, including on the route linking Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In public, at least 1,5m distance must be maintained except between members of the same household. Relaxation of restrictions On 6 May the federal government handed authority for relaxing restrictions over to state governments. A partial relaxation of restrictions involves: Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. From 15 June softer guidelines for travel abroad could be issued depending on coronavirus infections. (Reuters, 18.05.2020)

    Read more
    19.05.2020
  • Germany

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. The border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland have reopened and systemic checks have been replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg has fully reopened and no restrictions are in place between the countries. The border with Denmark continues to be in place until an official statement from Denmark has been released. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports, where medical teams have been posted. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, including on the route linking Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays are only permitted for work-related travel. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In Baden Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg West Pomerania, Saarland, Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt people are only allowed to leave their homes for essential purposes, such as work-related reasons, physical exercise, health reasons or to purchase essential supplies, such as food and medicine.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    On 6 May the federal government handed authority for relaxing restrictions over to state governments. A comprehensive list of restrictions in place at a state level is compiled (in German) by newspaper Die Zeit on their website. A partial relaxation of restrictions involves: Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. Beer gardens are set to reopen on 18 May with controlled health regulations in place. From 15 June softer guidelines for travel abroad could be issued depending on coronavirus infections. (Reuters, 18.05.2020)

    Read more
    18.05.2020
  • Germany German government plans to gradually reopen all borders amid concerns (Schengen Visa Info ,14.05.2020). High-speed services between Germany and France resume (Railway News, 12.05.2020) Government preparing to ease some COVID-19 restrictions from 11 May (Reuters, 04.05.2020) 1.Passengers are not allowed to enter Germany. This does not apply to: – nationals of Germany; – passengers with permanent residence in Germany obtained before Coronavirus (COVID-19) or with a D-Visa issued by Germany; – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany; – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists; – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option.

    The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved; – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members; – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation. 2. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days. – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    International restrictions:

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland have been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until 15 June. A full explanation of the restrictions in place is available (in German only) on the Bundespolizei website. From 16 May the closed border crossings with Austria, France and Switzerland will reopen and systemic checks will be replaced by spot checks. In addition, the border with Luxembourg will be fully reopened and the border with Denmark is expected (a formal agreement hasn’t been reached yet) to be fully reopened on 15 May. It is expected that the remaining controls at these borders would be lifted on 15 June. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination.

    All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. Full information on quarantine rules is available from the ministry of the interior’s website in English and German. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports, where medical teams have been posted. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, including on the route linking Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    The rules regarding social distancing are to be maintained at least until 10 May. Gatherings of more than two people outside work and the home are banned, except for members of the same household. In public spaces people must maintain at least five feet (1.5 metres) distance.

    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays are only permitted for work-related travel. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In Baden Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg West Pomerania, Saarland, Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt people are only allowed to leave their homes for essential purposes, such as work-related reasons, physical exercise, health reasons or to purchase essential supplies, such as food and medicine.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    A partial relaxation of restrictions that involves: Reopening of shops up to a size of 800 square meters (under strict hygiene requirements). Schools began reopening on 4 May. On 30 April the government announced that more non-essential establishments, including museums, zoos, memorials, galleries, botanic gardens, would be allowed to reopen in the coming days. The exact timing of the easing of these restrictions will vary from state to state. Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. Beer gardens are set to reopen on 18 May with controlled health regulations in place. Bavarian government: from 6 May onwards it is allowed to visit relatives from other households. Hamburg: Church services have resumed and outdoor sports allowed. Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania: Childcare to be resumed on 11 May, all preschool children can return to daycare on 18 May. Private meetings with people from two different households are now allowed to resume.

    Source: https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm https://pandemic.internationalsos.com/2019-ncov/ncov-travel-restrictions-flight-operations-and-screening https://de.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/

    Read more
    14.05.2020
  • Germany High-speed services between Germany and France resume (Railway News, 12.05.2020) Government preparing to ease some COVID-19 restrictions from 11 May (Reuters, 04.05.2020) 1.Passengers are not allowed to enter Germany. This does not apply to: – nationals of Germany; – passengers with permanent residence in Germany obtained before Coronavirus (COVID-19) or with a D-Visa issued by Germany; – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany; – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists; – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved; – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members; – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation. 2. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days. – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms. A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland has been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until at least 15 May. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include: Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany. EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000. Most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports,where medical teams have been posted.

    Internal restrictions:

    The rules regarding social distancing are to be maintained at least until 10 May. Gatherings of more than two people outside work and the home are banned, except for members of the same household. In public spaces people must maintain at least five feet (1.5 metres) distance. Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays are only permitted for work-related travel. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In Baden Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg West Pomerania, Saarland, Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt people are only allowed to leave their homes for essential purposes, such as work-related reasons, physical exercise, health reasons or to purchase essential supplies, such as food and medicine.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    A partial relaxation of restrictions that involves: Reopening of shops up to a size of 800 square meters (under strict hygiene requirements). Schools began reopening on 4 May. On 30 April the government announced that more non-essential establishments, including museums, zoos, memorials, galleries, botanic gardens, would be allowed to reopen in the coming days. The exact timing of the easing of these restrictions will vary from state to state. Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. Beer gardens are set to reopen on 18 May with controlled health regulations in place. Bavarian government: from 6 May onwards it is allowed to visit relatives from other households. Hamburg: Church services have resumed and outdoor sports allowed. Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania: Childcare to be resumed on 11 May, all preschool children can return to daycare on 18 May. Private meetings with people from two different households are now allowed to resume.

    Read more
    12.05.2020
  • Germany Government preparing to ease some COVID-19 restrictions from 11 May (Reuters, 04.05.2020)
    1.Passengers are not allowed to enter Germany.
    This does not apply to:
    – nationals of Germany;
    – passengers with permanent residence in Germany obtained before Coronavirus (COVID-19) or with a D-Visa issued by Germany;
    – husband, wife, child and registered partner of nationals or residents of Germany;
    – passengers with evidence that their travel is to perform a professional activity, e.g., commuters, diplomats, nursing staff, food industry personnel, specialists;
    – passengers in transit to their home country, if there is no other travel option. The purpose of travel and the entry requirements for the destination and transit countries must be proved;
    – US military personnel stationed in Germany and their family members;
    – merchant seamen who are going to sign up on board or leave Germany for the purpose of repatriation.
    2. Passengers allowed to enter Germany must self-isolate and must proceed directly to their own home, or other suitable accommodation for a period of 14 days.
    – This does not apply to merchant seamen without Coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms.

    A number of land and sea border crossing points with Austria, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, and Switzerland has been limited, and temporary border controls have been introduced at the remaining crossing points to those countries. In addition, air passengers travelling from Italy and Spain to Germany will be subject to immigration checks. These measures will remain in place until at least 15 May. Travelers without an urgent travel reason are not allowed to enter Germany. Groups that are allowed to cross the border include:
    Citizens, residents, long-term visa holders returning to Germany.
    EU citizens and third-country nationals transiting through Germany to their home country or place of residence if they can demonstrate with a ticket that there’s no alternative to travelling through Germany to reach their destination. All persons travelling for urgent reasons (including medical treatment, family deaths, caring for underage children). All persons moving goods, travelling for work-related reasons or to carry out a professional activity. This must be documented by carrying suitable documents (including employment contract, order documents, cross-border commuter card). Commuters also have a form to download and fill in). Spouses and registered partners. Which cross-border travel is considered mandatory remains at the discretion of border authorities. To discuss whether an exception would apply due to your individual circumstances you can contact the dedicated federal police office at +49 800 6 888 000.
    Most travellers allowed to enter Germany following several days abroad will have to undergo self-quarantine for 14 days. In practice, the quarantine is self-enforced. Police will hand the traveller a form and instruct them to self-isolate and contact the health department. Exceptions are provided for asymptomatic cross-border workers, business travellers on urgent business and transiting travellers. All travellers with COVID-19 related symptoms are referred to the local health authorities, who may require medical screenings or quarantine measures. Flag carrier Lufthansa is operating a revised flight schedule until further notice. Flights with suspected COVID-19 cases aboard will be diverted to dedicated airports,where medical teams have been posted.

    Internal restrictions:

    The rules regarding social distancing are to be maintained at least until 10 May. Gatherings of more than two people outside work and the home are banned, except for members of the same household. In public spaces people must maintain at least five feet (1.5 metres) distance.
    Wearing masks (non-medical) while using public transport and shopping is mandatory in all states. Overnight stays are only permitted for work-related travel. Major events prohibited at least until 31 August. In Baden Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Mecklenburg West Pomerania, Saarland, Saxony, and Saxony-Anhalt people are only allowed to leave their homes for essential purposes, such as work-related reasons, physical exercise, health reasons or to purchase essential supplies, such as food and medicine.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    A partial relaxation of restrictions that involves: Reopening of shops up to a size of 800 square meters (under strict hygiene requirements). Schools began reopening on 4 May. On 30 April the government announced that more non-essential establishments, including museums, zoos, memorials, galleries, botanic gardens, would be allowed to reopen in the coming days. The exact timing of the easing of these restrictions will vary from state to state. Between 9 and 22 May, pubs and restaurants are planned to reopen with 50% capacity. Beer gardens are set to reopen on 18 May with controlled health regulations in place. Bavarian government: from 6 May onwards it is allowed to visit relatives from other households. Hamburg: Church services have resumed and outdoor sports allowed. Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania: Childcare to be resumed on 11 May, all preschool children can return to daycare on 18 May. Private meetings with people from two different households are now allowed to resume.

    Read more
    09.05.2020
  • Source German Foreign Ministry/
    Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Re-Open Europe/
    Germany Government/
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