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Germany travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -214.05%
Open for citizens: none Open for foreigners: no entry Open for tourism: no entry Quarantine: none
Airlines Updates
Published on 16.05.2022, Star Alliance:

Star Alliance celebrates 25 years since its foundation.

Published on 12.05.2022, Lufthansa:

German union Verdi cancels pay deal for Lufthansa ground staff.

Published on 11.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa sees no significant restructuring costs in 2022.

Published on 10.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa to buy seven Boeing passenger aircraft, 10 cargo planes.

Published on 09.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Considering Purchasing Ex-Qatar Airbus A350-1000s.

Published on 06.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa examines ITA Airways as finance data opened to bidders

Published on 06.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa warns of summer disruptions as industry faces staffing shortages.

Published on 05.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa says fuel costs offset post-COVID travel boom in Q1.

Published on 04.05.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa launches flexible working initiative, aimed at customers looking for a workspace during their travels.

Published on 04.05.2022, Condor:

Condor returns to Toronto, inaugurates service to Tbilisi, Georgia.

Published on 29.04.2022, Condor Airlines:

Condor Airlines relaunches non-stop Frankfurt service from Minneapolis/St Paul’s Airport

Published on 29.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa integrates ‘carbon neutral’ options into booking process.

Published on 25.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa limits catering on some flights due to staff shortages.

Published on 25.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa's Frankfurt-Shenyang suspension extended into JUN22.

Published on 21.04.2022, Condor:

German airline Condor begins operation in Georgia starting 01MAY22.

Published on 21.04.2022, :

Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 travel regulations until end of May (The Local – Germany, 27.04.2022).

Published on 15.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa resumes route from Frankfurt to Austin

Published on 14.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa, Fraport and Munich Airport call on the European Union for a fair and effective climate policy.

Published on 12.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa boosts Ljubljana capacity.

Published on 11.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa debt climbed by $11 Billion due to pandemic.

Published on 11.04.2022, Condor:

Condor adds new Frankfurt flights to New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, resumes flights from Vienna

Published on 08.04.2022, Condor Airlines:

Condor Airlines to restart Frankfurt-Phoenix flights, from 21MAY22.

Published on 07.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa slashes flights on 07APR22 amid Fraport personnel shortages.

Published on 06.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa and airports call for fair EU climate policy

Published on 05.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Could Lufthansa form a Southern Europe hub after ITA takeover?

Published on 04.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Rome could be Lufthansa's fifth hub, CEO tells Corriere.

Published on 04.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa to close the A380 chapter for good.

Published on 04.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa CEO: 'Huge operational challenges' in airspace closures.

Published on 01.04.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Easter flights from Frankfurt are almost fully booked.

Published on 01.04.2022, Eurowings Discover:

Eurowings Discover makes maiden flight to Zimbabwe, from Frankfurt via Windhoek.

Published on 31.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa reconnects Munich with Bangkok, Thailand

Published on 29.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa planning to increase capacity to Thailand as travel demand surges.

Published on 29.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Kerosine costs take a hit: Lufthansa raises air fares on a broad front.

Published on 28.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa to increase flights to Bogotá.

Published on 25.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa finalizes EX-YU summer operations.

Published on 24.03.2022, Eurowings:

Eurowings Discover’s long-haul portfolio will be expanded to include Frankfurt-Panama City, from 27MAR22.

Published on 18.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa to station 26 long haul aircraft in Munich over summer 2022.

Published on 16.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Group to return three A380s to Airbus during 4Q2022.

Published on 09.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Transatlantic demand: Lufthansa boosts capacity to Buenos Aires

Published on 08.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa to launch a new regional subsidiary in 2023.

Published on 04.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa has no plans for majority stake in Italy’s ITA.

Published on 04.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa To Operate 85% Of Pre-Pandemic Capacity This Summer

Published on 04.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Cargo reports second consecutive year of record earnings in 2021.

Published on 04.03.2022, German Airways:

Embraer and German Airways announced Pool Program extension agreement.

Published on 03.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa on course for recovery, Ukraine crisis limits visibility.

Published on 01.03.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa cancels 30 flights to Russia this week.

Published on 28.02.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa cancels 30 flights to Russia this week

Published on 26.02.2022, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa will suspend flights to, from Russia until 5 March

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Germany
Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation- subject to categorisation.

There are currently no countries or areas listed as high-risk or virus variant.
*Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. They can produce a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
*Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrrier for entry, they can produce a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
*Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival.

Read more
Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification subject to special conditions.
Document checklist:
Travellers over the age of 12 must provide proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) are accepted if they meet the same requirements:
1. Proof of vaccination (completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days.)
Or
2. Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.
Or
3. Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.
Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern
enter home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.

Read more

Full Restrictions

  • Germany Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 travel regulations until end of May (The Local – Germany, 27.04.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: [as below]

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    Travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) are accepted if they meet the same requirements:

    • Proof of vaccination after receiving full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days except for persons under the age of 18. Vaccines authorised by the European Union (EU) or vaccines which are licensed in a third country and identical in formulation to a vaccine in the EU are accepted. 

    Or

    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  

    Or

    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    Special rules apply to travellers arriving in Germany from countries designated as “high-risk” or “virus variant.” High-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions, including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern.

    Although no countries or areas are currently identified as high-risk or virus variant, this situation may change at short notice:

    • Travellers arriving from such international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive.
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: Medical grade masks, usually FFP-2 masks, are legally required on public transport and in health and social care settings. You should bring an FFP-2 mask with you to Germany.
    States are permitted to declare themselves or areas of their territory a hotspot and impose more stringent measures, such as mask-wearing in other settings or C-19 certification. States’ measures are available from the German government.
    If travellers develop symptoms associated with COVID-19 (coughing, a runny nose, sore throat or fever) they should get in touch by phone with a doctor or contact the hotline 116 117. Often travel guides or hotels can also help in such cases. Guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases after 5 days. The German authorities recommend staying in self-isolation until you test negative with a rapid-antigen test.

    Read more
    19.05.2022
  • Germany Germany’s annual beer festival, Oktoberfest, will return to entertain tourists and locals in Munich in October, after a two-year pause due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    According to The Local, Munich Mayor Dieter Reiter said that the festival would be held this year without any restrictions, which indicates that a surge in tourists to Germany is anticipated.

    “I hope the situation does not get worse in the autumn and that the festival will not have to be called off at the last minute,” Reiter said in a press conference.

    The Minister-President of Bavaria, Markus Söder, also pointed out that the return of Oktoberfest is a good sign, especially in difficult times, implying the COVID-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine which has impacted the EU significantly.

    Söder also noted that the beer festival is Bavaria’s international flagship. However, while empathising with Ukraine, he said that cancelling the Oktoberfest as a result of the war “cannot be justified.”

    Oktoberfest, which will be held from Saturday, September 17 until Monday, October 3, is an annual beer festival where more than six million visitors gather to have an authentic beer and enjoy music with friends.

    According to Statista, on average, seven million litres of beer are poured at the festival, continuing for 17 days. This could generate up to €75.7 million Euros in gross revenue, provided that 2017’s average beer price for a litre of beer (called Maß in Bavaria) sets the base. The whole festival has loads of other stuff on offer, such as traditional Bavarian food, merchandise, and a fairground ride.

    Before the COVID-19 Pandemic, a total of six million people came to Munich for Oktoberfest in 2016, with 600,000 guests arriving in the first week of the festival alone. During the same year, visitors brought a total of €1 billion to Germany, and 12,000 jobs were created during the festival, which supported locals at least during the event.

    “We assume after plausible estimates that we have an economic value of roughly one billion euros due to Oktoberfest. 350 million are directly spent on the Oktoberfest grounds. An additional 250 million is spent in the shops, on retail, and the rest is the sum that is being spend on overnight stays in hotels,” Josef Schmid, the Munich Deputy Mayor at the time, had said.

    At present, Bavarians are set to attract similar numbers of visitors while hoping that the cases of COVID-19 won’t increase. Data from the World Health Organisation (WHO) shows that 415,153 positive cases of Coronavirus and 79 deaths related to the virus have been reported in Germany during the recent week.

    Read more
    11.05.2022
  • Germany The German authorities have decided to prolong the existing Coronavirus entry restrictions until the end of May upon an evaluation that the current COVID-19 situation does not permit for the complete removal of the travel rules.

    The decision has been announced by the German portal deutschland.de, which is a service provided by Fazit Communication GmbH, Frankfurt-am-Main, in cooperation with the Federal Foreign Office in Berlin. The restrictions were set to end this Thursday, on April 28.

    “To protect against the spread of Coronavirus, entry regulations are to remain in force for the time being for holiday returnees and travellers to Germany,” is said in an update published by the portal.

    According to the update, the move has been confirmed by a spokesperson of the Federal Ministry of Health, and it means that travellers from third countries aged 12 and older will remain obliged to show proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in order to be able to enter the country.

    Travellers entering Germany on the basis of a COVID vaccine certificate must make sure they have been vaccinated within the last 180 days with the last shot, or have received their booster, otherwise, their vaccination will be considered invalid. At the same time, the only vaccines accepted as valid proof of vaccination for entry are those approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the ones adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    Recovery certificates on the other hand, are accepted only if the traveller has been infected with COVID-19 in the last 90 days before the trip to Germany.

    Those who haven’t been vaccinated, nor previously infected with COVID-19, will need to present negative Coronavirus test results, either PCR or antigen, taken within the 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    “The regulation also provides for quarantine obligations for returnees from so-called high-risk or virus-variant areas. Currently, however, no country is classified as such by the Federal Government,” is said in the update.

    On March 3, Germany had removed all of the countries on its high-risk list, thus permitting everyone to enter its territory without the obligation to quarantine or test upon arrival, for both, essential and non-essential purposes, regardless of the traveller’s country of departure. The only requirement imposed was presenting proof of vaccination, recovery from COVID-19, or negative test results.

    The authorities have, however, pointed out, that in case of the deterioration of the Coronavirus in the country and/or further in the world, entry restrictions will be reinstated.

    Read more
    28.04.2022
  • Germany Germany is preparing for an influx of tourists from the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Kuwait, and Bahrain, which make up the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

    Arrivals from these countries are expected to surge as the Eid holiday approaches. Germany is a popular destination for such travellers due to its city breaks, natural-related explorations, adventure holidays, and sporting experiences.

    “While Germany has countless attractions, some of the key inspirations for Eid travel include the town of Marburg, which is celebrating its 800th anniversary this spring, so culture vultures have the chance to revel in a tour that spans eight centuries of history and includes important figures such as Saint Elisabeth, Landgrave Philipp, and Emil von Behring,” a press release issued by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action reads.

    Other interesting spots to visit include the Blue Mosque in Hamburg, one of the oldest Islamic sights in Germany with a capacity of 1,500 people. The mosque also has one of the world’s largest carpets which took three solid years to complete, and about 22 people had to hand-tie 80 million knots.

    As per food, Berlin’s Sonnenallee, for some known as ‘Arab Street’, is a popular destination for halal cuisine, with bakeries, diverse cafes, and Arab stores.

    In other areas of Berlin, such as Tiergarten, Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg, and Neukölln, travellers can try out a variety of foods throughout the country, from Turkish delights in Hamburg and Syrian delicacies in Frankfurt to halal supermarkets in almost every German city.

    “Germany’s longstanding ties with various international communities have seen a number of cultural and historical sites emerge, with many of these key sites of keen interest for GCC travellers,” Yamina Sofo, Director of Sales and Marketing at the German Tourism National, said.

    Furthermore, the Thuringia Bach Festival, where Johann Sebastian Bach’s renowned music will be played, will be available to see until May 5, with 47 concerts across the state.

    As per entry rules, all travellers are permitted to enter the country, provided they can present one of the following certificates:

    Vaccination certificate, indicating the holder is fully vaccinated against COVID-19
    Recovery certificate, demonstrating the holder has recovered from the virus in the last 180 days
    Test certificate, which shows that the holder has tested negative for Coronavirus in the last 72 hours.

    Read more
    23.04.2022
  • Germany Germany is preparing for an influx of tourists from the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Kuwait, and Bahrain, which make up the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC).

    Arrivals from these countries are expected to surge as the Eid holiday approaches. Germany is a popular destination for such travellers due to its city breaks, natural-related explorations, adventure holidays, and sporting experiences.

    “While Germany has countless attractions, some of the key inspirations for Eid travel include the town of Marburg, which is celebrating its 800th anniversary this spring, so culture vultures have the chance to revel in a tour that spans eight centuries of history and includes important figures such as Saint Elisabeth, Landgrave Philipp, and Emil von Behring,” a press release issued by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Climate Action reads.

    Other interesting spots to visit include the Blue Mosque in Hamburg, one of the oldest Islamic sights in Germany with a capacity of 1,500 people. The mosque also has one of the world’s largest carpets which took three solid years to complete, and about 22 people had to hand-tie 80 million knots.

    As per food, Berlin’s Sonnenallee, for some known as ‘Arab Street’, is a popular destination for halal cuisine, with bakeries, diverse cafes, and Arab stores.

    In other areas of Berlin, such as Tiergarten, Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg, and Neukölln, travellers can try out a variety of foods throughout the country, from Turkish delights in Hamburg and Syrian delicacies in Frankfurt to halal supermarkets in almost every German city.

    “Germany’s longstanding ties with various international communities have seen a number of cultural and historical sites emerge, with many of these key sites of keen interest for GCC travellers,” Yamina Sofo, Director of Sales and Marketing at the German Tourism National, said.

    Furthermore, the Thuringia Bach Festival, where Johann Sebastian Bach’s renowned music will be played, will be available to see until May 5, with 47 concerts across the state.

    As per entry rules, all travellers are permitted to enter the country, provided they can present one of the following certificates:

    Vaccination certificate, indicating the holder is fully vaccinated against COVID-19
    Recovery certificate, demonstrating the holder has recovered from the virus in the last 180 days
    Test certificate, which shows that the holder has tested negative for Coronavirus in the last 72 hours.

    Read more
    23.04.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: [as below]

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    Travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) are accepted if they meet the same requirements:

    • Proof of vaccination after receiving full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days. Vaccines authorised by the European Union (EU) or vaccines which are licensed in a third country and identical in formulation to a vaccine in the EU are accepted. 

    Or

    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  

    Or

    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    Special rules apply to travellers arriving in Germany from countries designated as “high-risk” or “virus variant.” High-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions, including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern.

    Although no countries or areas are currently identified as high-risk or virus variant, this situation may change at short notice:

    • Travellers arriving from such international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive.
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    21.04.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: [as below]

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    Travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) are accepted if they meet the same requirements:

    • Proof of vaccination after receiving full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days. Vaccines authorised by the European Union (EU) or vaccines which are licensed in a third country and identical in formulation to a vaccine in the EU are accepted. 

    Or

    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  

    Or

    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    Special rules apply to travellers arriving in Germany from countries designated as “high-risk” or “virus variant.” High-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions, including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern.

    Although no countries or areas are currently identified as high-risk or virus variant, this situation may change at short notice:

    • Travellers arriving from such international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive.
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    12.04.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: [as below]

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    Travellers over the age of 12 must provide proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) are accepted if they meet the same requirements: 

    1. Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (with Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, a second dose of one of the vaccines is required. At least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).

    Or

    2. Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  

    Or

    3. Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    Special rules apply to travellers arriving in Germany from countries designated as “high-risk” or “virus variant.” High-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions, including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern.

    Although no countries or areas are currently identified as high-risk or virus variant, this situation may change at short notice:

    • Travellers arriving from such international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive.
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    11.04.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    Travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). This rule also applies to passengers in transit at German airports. 

    1. Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (with Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, a second dose of one of the vaccines is required. At least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).

    Or

    2. Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  

    Or

    3. Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    Special rules apply to travellers arriving in Germany from countries designated as “high-risk” or “virus variant.” High-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions, including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern.

    Although no countries or areas are currently identified as high-risk or virus variant, this situation may change at short notice:

    • Travellers arriving from such international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive.
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    30.03.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    1. All travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Details in the section below.

    2. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    • There are currently no countries or areas listed as high-risk or virus variant. However, this can change at short notice: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    29.03.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    1. All travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Details in the section below.

    2. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    • There are currently no countries or areas listed as high-risk or virus variant. However, this can change at short notice: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    25.03.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Government lifts COVID-19 requirements for long-distance rail travel, relaxes majority of restrictions in country (Schengen Visa Info, 21.03.2022). Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    1. All travellers over the age of 12 must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Details in the section below.

    2. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    • There are currently no countries or areas listed as high-risk or virus variant. However, this can change at short notice: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    24.03.2022
  • Germany Announcement: Frankfurt Airport Strike
    A strike by security staff at Frankfurt Airport has been announced for Tuesday, March 22 2022. The strike activities are expected to cause major disruptions and flight cancellations throughout the day. In particular, the security checkpoints outside the transit area will remain closed throughout the day. Thus, originating passengers departing from Frankfurt will not be able to pass through the legally required security checks and get to their flights. We therefore strongly advise all originating passengers from Frankfurt to avoid coming to the airport. Please contact your airline or travel operator as soon as possible for information on your flight.

    We expect that transfer processes for connecting passengers in the transit area will still largely be possible. Nevertheless, also transfer passengers should expect disruptions and delays due to the strike.

    We kindly ask all affected passengers for their understanding.

    Disruption to Train Services to/from Frankfurt Airport
    Train servics to and from Frankfurt Airport are expected to be disrupted until March 22, due to the closure of the S-Bahn (suburban train) line between the stations Mainz-Bischofsheim and Rüsselsheim. Long-distance and regional trains serving the airport are likely to be affected by delays, diversions or cancellations. A replacement bus service has been provided for commuters between the two stations. Updates (in German) are available on the websites of Deutsche Bahn and the local RMV transport association

    Road Access to Terminals 1 and 2
    Construction work is underway on the access roads to Frankfurt Airport’s Terminals 1 and 2, leading to diversions and possible traffic congestion (particularly affecting the Arrivals drive-by areas and parking lot P35). If travelling to the airport by car, we strongly recommend taking advantage of our easily accessible terminal parking garages, including for short-term parking.

    Lufthansa’s Notice:
    Strike of the security staff on 22 March at the airports in Berlin, Bremen, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Cologne, Hamburg, Hanover and Stuttgart

    Due to a strike of the security personnel on 22 March at the airports in Berlin, Bremen, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Cologne, Hamburg, Hanover and Stuttgart, there will be considerable restrictions in the Lufthansa Group flight schedule as well as in ground handling and security checks at these airports. Please check the status of your flight before you travel. If your flight is cancelled, we kindly ask you to refrain from travelling to the airport. Further information for passengers departing from Frankfurt can be found in the section below.
    Please reduce your hand luggage as much as possible to allow for a quick check-in at the security checkpoints. For check-in, please use the online service or your Lufthansa app.

    Flights from Frankfurt on 22 March

    Due to a strike by the security staff at Frankfurt Airport on 22 March, there will be massive restrictions for passengers planning a journey commencing in Frankfurt on that day.

    Passengers will not be able to change from the public area to the security area in Frankfurt. For this reason, it will not be possible for local passengers to depart from Frankfurt.

    You have a journey commencing in Frankfurt on 22 March?

    You can rebook free of charge on any other Lufthansa Group flight (Lufthansa, SWISS; Austrian Airlines, Brussels Airlines, Eurowings, Eurowings Discover, Air Dolomiti) until 27 March. Please use our online rebooking service. A change of the flight routing in the ticket is not permitted. If you wish to have your ticket refunded, you can also submit this via the online service.

    Please do not come to Frankfurt Airport on 22 March. It will not be possible to depart on this day, even if your flight is shown as not cancelled and you may be able to check in via an online portal.

    The same applies to guests travelling to Frankfurt via Lufthansa Express Rail or Express Bus. Here, too, there is no possibility of boarding at the departure gate.
    If you have booked a domestic flight from Frankfurt, you can exchange your flight coupon for a Deutsche Bahn ticket free of charge on this page.

    You are transiting via Frankfurt on 22 March?

    Lufthansa plans to offer a regular flight schedule via Frankfurt. If you only change planes in Frankfurt, you can start your journey as usual. We kindly ask you to check the status of your flight before you start your journey. Please also reduce your hand luggage as much as possible to allow for a quick check-in at the security checkpoints in the transit area in Frankfurt.

    Please do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt under any circumstances. It will then no longer be possible to return to this area to your departure gate.

    Do you have a flight that ends in Frankfurt on 22 March?

    There are no restrictions at Frankfurt Airport for travellers disembarking in Frankfurt. However, please also check the status of your flight before you start your journey.

    Are you travelling to Frankfurt with an LH Express Rail / Bus ticket and have a connecting flight?

    Unfortunately, the regulation for local passengers also applies to you; there is no access to the passenger area. Please rebook your travel dates as described in the chapter above.

    Read more
    22.03.2022
  • Germany Germany’s government has announced that it would relax the majority of restrictions imposed due to the Coronavirus and its new strains, despite the fact that the country is recording high rates of infections caused by the virus, especially the Omicron variant.

    The decision comes after Germany’s parliament voted to lift the restrictions imposed on public spaces across the country; however, such a decision has not been considered appropriate by the opposition Christian Democratic Union reports.

    The parliament approved a new law on Friday that permits abolishing the majority of preventive measures imposed due to the Coronavirus, while the new Infection Protection Act was considered a “difficult compromise” by Health Minister Karl Lauterbach.

    Authorities in Germany have clarified that the requirement to wear a mask will remain compulsory on public transport, as well as hospitals and care homes; however, it will no longer be obligatory in restaurants and shops.

    The 3G rule of being vaccinated against the virus or recovered or tested is also abolished for long-distance rail travel.

    However, mask-wearing, as well as mandatory tests, can be required in hospitals, care facilities as well as doctor’s clinics.

    In addition, authorities in Germany have also clarified that the obligation to meet the 3G rule at workplaces will no longer be applied. Still, companies can introduce their own rules, taking into account the epidemiological situation.

    The government has also clarified that the 16 German states are permitted to keep the measures in place and also impose additional measures in case of a deterioration of the COVID-19 situation.

    The new changes introduced by German authorities were a compromise between Lauterbach’s Social Democrats (SPD) as well as the Free Democratic Party (FDP), part of SPD Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s governing coalition.

    According to Deutsche Welle, without the new law, the restrictions imposed previously by the country’s authorities due to COVID-19 would have expired on Saturday.

    “We can’t continue to shield the whole country to protect a small group of those unwilling from being vaccinated,” Minister Lauterbach has stressed in this regard.

    Authorities in Germany have registered a total of 18,287,986 cases of COVID-19 infection since the start of the pandemic, while a total of 126,646 people have died during the same period, based on the data provided by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    The same source shows that in the last seven days, over 1,530,320 cases of COVID-19 infection have been registered in the last seven days, while more than 1,370 people have died during the same period.

    According to the figures provided by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), only on March 17 did Germany register over 294,000 cases of COVID-19 infection.

    In this regard, Germany’s Health Minister Lauterbach emphasized that the pandemic “is unfortunately not over yet” while adding that the country needs further protective measures.

    Read more
    21.03.2022
  • Germany Due to a strike of security checkpoint personnel represented by the German labor union VER.DI passengers scheduled to leave from Frankfurt Airport on Tuesday, March 15th will not be able to catch their flight and are instructed not to come to the airport.

    Due to a strike by security staff at several German airports today, major disruptions and flight cancellations can also be expected at Frankfurt Airport. In particular, the security checkpoints outside the transit area will not be staffed throughout the day. Thus, for the duration of the strike, passengers departing locally from Frankfurt will not be able to use the security checkpoints to get to their flights. We therefore strongly advise all originating passengers from Frankfurt to avoid coming to the airport. Please contact your airline or travel operator as soon as possible for information on your flight.

    Transfer processes for connecting passengers in the transit area will still largely be possible. Nevertheless, transfer passengers should also expect disruptions and delays due to the strike activities.

    We kindly ask all affected passengers for their understanding.

    Read more
    15.03.2022
  • Germany 2,500 Ukrainians who are currently in Moldova, after fleeing the war zone in their homeland, will be relocated in the following days to Germany. The move was announced by Moldova’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs upon a meeting of the Minister with his German counterpart Annalena Bareback in Moldova’s Capital Chișinău.

    The meeting took place on March 12, during which Minister Nicu Popescu thanked Minister Bareback for the Berlin initiative to relocate 2,500 Ukrainian refugees from Moldova to Germany, SchengenVisaInfo.com report

    Since Russia started the military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, more than 270,300 people have crossed into Moldova, and nearly 123,000 refugees have been registered in Germany so far.

    In this regard, Deputy Prime Minister Nicu Popescu said that the ongoing war seriously damages the economy, the welfare and budget, since according to him, due to the unjustified war, exports and imports coming from Ukraine have been affected in several markets.

    “Obviously, this regional instability undermines our ability to attract investment, and in this sense, the war is a severe blow to the well-being of the citizens of the Republic of Moldova,” the Minister also pointed out.

    Previously, the German Interior Ministry had announced that the arrival of Ukrainian refugees in Germany is more concentrated in some cities, especially in Berlin, because the transport is made by train from Poland.

    Meanwhile, according to the ministry spokesman, the problem is that any measure aimed at redistributing refugees to other German cities can not be implemented since Ukrainian citizens can enter the EU without visas and can travel freely not only throughout Germany but also the whole Schengen Area.

    Regarding the overall number of Ukrainian refugees since the Russian invasion began, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, in a Twitter post on Friday, March 11, announced that the number had reached over 2.5 million.

    Moreover, Deputy Prime Minister Popescu added that the contribution of German investors and the assistance they are providing for cooperation and development has returned to jobs, emphasising that thanks to the Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement (DCFTA), it has become possible to diversify Moldova’s exports to the German market.

    “The Republic of Moldova and Germany will continue to strengthen our privileged partnership towards the European Union, which means for us the integration in the space of Freedom, Stability and Peace,” the Deputy Prime Minister also stressed.

    Read more
    15.03.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities announce all countries will be removed from its COVID-19 high-risk list from 3 March; new entry rules will apply (SVI, 02.03.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Document checklist

    1. All travellers over the age of six must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen). Details in the section below.

    2. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Entry from high-risk and virus variant countries/areas

    • There are currently no countries or areas listed as high-risk or virus variant. However, this can change at short notice: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas with widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions including German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to enter quarantine on arrival. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    04.03.2022
  • Germany The German authorities have announced that starting from tomorrow, March 3, all countries will be removed from its high-risk list.

    “As of Thursday, March 3, 2022, at 0:00 a.m., with the entry into force of the “Third Amendment Ordinance to the Coronavirus Entry Ordinance”, no states/regions will be considered high-risk areas,” the statement of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) reads.

    The move means that travellers, regardless of their country of origin, can now enter Germany without being subject to additional entry rules, such as pre-entry testing and quarantine requirements, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    The German body responsible for disease prevention and control, RKI, explained that the country has decided to ease its travel rules as the Omicron variant does not cause serious health implications like the other variants did.

    In addition, the same has noted that the high-risk classification will now only apply to areas that register increased infection rates.

    “The classification as a high-risk area only applies to areas in which there is a high incidence in relation to the spread of variants with higher virulence than the omicron variant. There is therefore no longer any identification of high-risk areas due to the spread of the omicron variant,” RKI added.

    In line with the newly updated rules, starting from tomorrow, all travellers from a European Union/Schengen Area as well as those from a safe third country will be able to enter Germany without having to register their entry or follow additional entry rules.

    All they have to do is present a valid vaccination or recovery certificate or a negative COVID-19 test result.

    Germany accepts all vaccination certificates that prove that the holder that been fully vaccinated with one of the doses of the approved vaccine in the last 270 days. Those who have received a booster shot are also permitted restriction-free entry.

    Recovery certificates are recognised as long as the document proves that the holder has recovered from the virus within the last 180 days. As for negative test results, the authorities have explained that Germany accepts PCR tests taken within 72 hours and rapid antigen tests taken within 48 hours before arrival.

    The requirement to present one of the above-mentioned documents applies to all individuals over the age of six.

    In contrast to EU/Schengen Area travellers, different rules apply to travellers from third countries. The German Federal Foreign Office emphasises that third-country travellers are permitted entry to Germany only if they have been fully vaccinated against the virus.

    “Entry from any other country for any purpose (including visits and tourism) is only possible for fully vaccinated people,” the statement of the Federal Foreign Office reads.

    Read more
    02.03.2022
  • Germany Travellers from nine European Union/ Schengen Area countries and 25 non-EU countries will be able to travel to Germany under facilitated rules from February 27 as the latter’s authorities have decided to remove them from the high-risk list.

    Updating the list of countries that are no longer highly affected by the Coronavirus, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) has announced that all the following EU/Schengen Area countries and territories will no longer be categorised as high-risk:

    Belgium
    Bulgaria
    French overseas department of Guadeloupe, Saint Barthélemy, and St. Martin
    Italy
    Croatia
    Luxembourg
    Netherlands – Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao, Saba, St. Eustatius and Sint Maarten
    Poland
    San Marino
    Sweden
    Hungary
    The move means that travellers from the above-mentioned countries and territories will no longer be required to register their entry before entering Germany. Additionally, they will also be exempt from the self-isolation requirement as of February 27.

    However, the German authorities have highlighted that all incoming travellers are still required to present a certificate that indicates that the holder has recovered, has been vaccinated against the virus, or has tested negative.

    The requirement to present proof upon entry applies to everyone regardless of their country of origin.

    “Every person over the age of six is obliged to carry proof of their COVID‑19 status when entering Germany. Persons over the age of six must therefore have a negative test result or proof of recovery or vaccination when entering Germany,” the statement of the German Federal Foreign Office reads.

    Germany accepts vaccination passes as long as the holder has completed primary vaccination with one of the vaccine doses that Germany recognises within the last 270 days (nine months) or has received a booster shot.

    Recovery certificates are accepted only if the last positive test result has been carried out no more than 90 days before entering Germany. As for negative tests, the authorities have explained that Germany accepts both rapid antigen and PCR tests. The rapid antigen test must be carried out within 48 hours, and the PCR test must be taken within 72 hours before arrival

    Additionally, the following 25 third countries will also be removed from Germany’s high-risk list this Sunday:

    Albania
    Antigua and Barbuda
    Argentina
    Australia
    Bangladesh
    Belize
    Bolivia
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Ecuador
    Granada
    Guyana
    Iraq
    Colombia
    Kosovo
    Madagascar
    Montenegro
    North Macedonia
    Panama
    Peru
    The Philippines
    Saint Lucia
    Serbia
    Seychelles
    Suriname
    Ukraine
    Travellers from these third countries or any other non-EU country that is no longer part of the high-risk list can now enter Germany under facilitated entry rules as long as they present a valid vaccination certificate.

    Recovery certificates issued by third countries are currently not recognised in Germany.

    “Entry from any other country for any purpose (including visits and tourism) is only possible for fully vaccinated people,” the German authorities highlighted.

    Read more
    26.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities remove several countries from high-risk list, ease entry rules from 20 February (SVI, 19.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas where there is widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions that include German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children who have stayed in a high-risk area are no longer required to quarantine on arrival.

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. All travellers over the age of six must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen):

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days.
    • Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (with Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, a second dose of one of the vaccines is required. At least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  
    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    2. Travellers arriving from designated international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive. 

    3. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    24.02.2022
  • Germany The German Health Minister, Karl Lauterbach, has announced that the country will ease the COVID-19 entry restrictions for children.

    The Minister said for Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung that the country’s authorities are expected to relax the entry rules for children as the Omicron variant no longer poses a threat to public health.

    In line with Germany’s current entry rules, all children under 12 who have not been vaccinated or recovered from the virus and who reach Germany from a country that is placed on its high-risk list need to follow a ten-day quarantine requirement.

    However, the self-isolation period can be ended earlier by presenting by undergoing a COVID-19 test no earlier than five days.

    “The requirement to quarantine applies to arrivals from high-risk areas until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the entry portal of the Federal Republic of Germany (www.einreiseanmeldung.de),” the statement of the German Federal Ministry of Health reads.

    On the other hand, different rules currently apply to children under the age of six. Children under six can end their quarantine automatically after the fifth day without having to undergo testing.

    “Children under the age of six are exempt from the obligation to furnish proof. In their case, quarantine after a stay in a high-risk area automatically ends after the fifth day following the entry into Germany,” the Ministry’s statement reads.

    Since almost all EU/Schengen Area countries are currently part of Germany’s high-risk list, the quarantine requirement that applies to unvaccinated and unrecovered children has made the travel process for those wishing to visit Germany more complex.

    The new entry rules that are to be applied to children now need to be officially approved by the country’s authorities in order for them to start being fully effective. As soon as they enter into force, children will be able to enter Germany without having to follow the quarantine requirement.

    It is yet to be seen whether Germany will also ease the travel rules for adult travellers, especially those travelling from third countries.

    Read more
    23.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add Iran, Solomon Islands to COVID-19 high-risk list, remove nine countries (Schengen Visa Info, 12.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas where there is widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions that include German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children younger than 6 years who have stayed in a high-risk area may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. All travellers over the age of six must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen):

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days.
    • Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (with Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, a second dose of one of the vaccines is required. At least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  
    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    2. Travellers arriving from designated international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive. 

    3. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport. Often an FFP-2 mask is required and you should make sure you have an FFP-2 mask with you. More guidance from the Federal Health Ministry is available.
    German states often require C-19 certification, such asproof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements during term time. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status using Germany’s two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below)or the UK COVID Pass. Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in electronic form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Germany will accept proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record and proof of COVID-19 vaccination issued in the Crown Dependencies. Your final vaccine dose must have been administered at least 14 days prior to travel. Your appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App

    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    16.02.2022
  • Germany The German authorities have announced that travellers from another three countries will now be subject to stricter entry rules as they have been added to the high-risk list.

    According to the latest update published by the German agency responsible for disease prevention and control, Robert Koch Institute, starting from February 6, the high-risk list will include the following three countries:

    Armenia
    Azerbaijan
    The Palestinian Territories
    In line with Germany’s current entry rules, all persons who enter its territory from one of the three areas listed above, as well as any other country that is already part of the high-risk list, are required to register their entry at einreiseanmeldung.de and carry the confirmation with them.

    In addition, travellers from high-risk areas must present proof of recovery or proof of vaccination to be permitted entry to the country, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    Except for that, travellers from high-risk areas are also required to follow a ten-day quarantine requirement.

    However, RKI has explained that the quarantine period can be ended at the time travellers update their proof of recovery or recovery at einreiseanmeldung.de.

    This means that as soon a traveller from a high-risk area uploads proof of vaccination or recovery to the website, they will no longer be subject to the self-isolation rule, thus, suggesting that only unvaccinated and unrecovered travellers from high-risk areas must stay self-isolated when reaching Germany.

    Still, unvaccinated and unrecovered travellers can end their quarantine earlier by presenting a negative test taken on or after the fifth day.

    On the other hand, the German authorities have announced that starting from February 6, 32 countries will no longer be part of the high-risk list. The countries that will be removed from the high-risk list are as follows:

    Equatorial Guinea
    Ethiopia
    Benin
    Botswana
    Burkina Faso
    Cape Verde
    Ivory Coast
    Djibouti
    Eritrea
    Gabon
    Gambia
    Ghana
    Guinea
    Guinea Bissau
    Cameroon
    Comoros
    Liberia
    Mali
    Mauritania
    Mozambique
    Niger
    Nigeria
    The Republic of the Congo
    Sao Tome and Principe
    Senegal
    Sierra Leone
    Somalia
    Sudan
    South Sudan
    Togo
    Chad
    The Central African Republic
    The decision to remove the above-listed countries from the high-risk list means that travellers from these areas can now enter Germany under facilitated entry rules.

    Read more
    07.02.2022
  • Germany Persons who reach Germany need to provide valid proof that they have received the last vaccine dose (of a two-dose vaccination scheme) within the last 270 days in order to be exempt from additional entry measures, such as testing and quarantine requirement.

    It is believed that persons who have been vaccinated more than 270 days ago will be considered unvaccinated when reaching Germany if they haven’t yet received a booster shot.

    Nonetheless, the German authorities haven’t yet given any information regarding booster doses and the corresponding interval times. Booster shot refers to the third vaccine that is given to persons who have already completed primary vaccination.

    Apart from this change, Germany has also shortened the validity of recovery certificates.

    According to the German responsible body for disease prevention and control, Robert Koch Institute (RKI), recovery certificates are now valid for only a period of 90 days.

    Previously, recovery certificates were valid for 180 days. However, according to the German authorities, unvaccinated persons who have been infected with the virus are only temporarily protected from the disease. For this reason, they have decided to shorten its validity.

    “The duration of the recovered status was reduced from 6 months to 90 days because the scientific evidence to date indicates that unvaccinated individuals who have had an infection have reduced and even more temporary protection against reinfection with the omicron variant compared to the delta variant,” RKI notes.

    Germany also urged the EU to reduce the recovery certificates’ validity to 90 days. The German Health Minister Karl Lauterbach has called the European Union to make such a proposal in order to protect public health within the bloc.

    Read more
    07.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add Armenia, Azerbaijan, Palestinian Territories to COVID-19 high-risk list, remove 32 countries (SVI, 05.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is an increased risk of infection or where there are other indications that there is such risk; virus variant areas can be areas where there is widespread occurence of a mutant strain of the virus that is not prevalent in Germany. With only a few exceptions that include German citizens, airlines are prohibited from carrying persons from areas of variant concern. 
    • Travellers entering Germany following a stay in a designated high-risk area enter home quarantine for 10 days. Home quarantine can be ended early by submitting proof of vaccination or of recovery via the upload portal Digital Registration on Entry. If these documents were already submitted, no quarantine is necessary. For all others, quarantine can only end with a negative test result. 
    • Travellers approved for entry from a stay in an area of variant concern enter home quarantine for 14 days. At the time of entry they must present their carrier with a negative PCR test result. Proof of vaccination or recovery does not suffice. In the context of cross-border traffic into Germany, this proof may be demanded by the Federal Police. If using a carrier to enter Germany, the PCR test result must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the scheduled start of the journey. 
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers who spent time in an area of variant concern to take additional PCR tests after entry.
    • Children younger than 6 years who have stayed in a high-risk area may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. All travellers over the age of six must carry with them proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result (PCR or antigen):

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccine certificates are valid for 270 days.
    • Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (with Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, a second dose of one of the vaccines is required. At least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Proof of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 90 days prior.  
    • Negative result to a test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of entry. Where entry takes place using a carrier, the scheduled time of departure is decisive.

    2. Travellers arriving from designated international risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before they arrive. 

    3. Passengers in transit at German airports are also required to provide proof of their COVID-19 status: vaccination, recovery or testing. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    06.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add Armenia, Azerbaijan, Palestinian Territories to COVID-19 high-risk list, remove 32 countries (SVI, 05.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should only enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurence of COVID-19 variants. Except for German citizens and in rare cases, there is a ban on entry into Germany from virus variant areas.
    • Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. As an alternative to proof of vaccination or recovery, they can provide a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
    • Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier for entry, they should provide a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
    • Children younger than 12 years may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or test result: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (as of 15 January, in the case of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson a second dose of one of the specificed vaccines is required. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Recovered persons have to present proof of vaccination or proof of testing if more than 90 days have passed since the date of their positive test. They can avoid quarantine by submitting a negative test result.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of the carrier departure. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    04.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities shorten validity of COVID-19 vaccination certificates (SVI, 03.02.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should only enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurence of COVID-19 variants. Except for German citizens and in rare cases, there is a ban on entry into Germany from virus variant areas.
    • Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. As an alternative to proof of vaccination or recovery, they can provide a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
    • Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier for entry, they should provide a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
    • Children younger than 12 years may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or test result: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (as of 15 January, in the case of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson a second dose of one of the specificed vaccines is required. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Recovered persons have to present proof of vaccination or proof of testing if more than 90 days have passed since the date of their positive test. They can avoid quarantine by submitting a negative test result.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of the carrier departure. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    02.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add 12 countries to COVID-19 high-risk list, remove another 13 (SVI, 29.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should only enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurence of COVID-19 variants. Except for German citizens and in rare cases, there is a ban on entry into Germany from virus variant areas.
    • Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. As an alternative to proof of vaccination or recovery, they can provide a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
    • Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier for entry, they should provide a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
    • Children younger than 12 years may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or test result: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (as of 15 January, in the case of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson a second dose of one of the specificed vaccines is required. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Recovered persons have to present proof of vaccination or proof of testing if more than 90 days have passed since the date of their positive test. They can avoid quarantine by submitting a negative test result.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of the carrier departure. 

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    01.02.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add 12 countries to COVID-19 high-risk list, remove another 13 (SVI, 29.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should only enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurence of COVID-19 variants. Except for German citizens and in rare cases, there is a ban on entry into Germany from virus variant areas.
    • Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. As an alternative to proof of vaccination or recovery, they can provide a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
    • Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier for entry, they should provide a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
    • Children younger than 12 years may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or test result: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (as of 15 January, in the case of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson a second dose of one of the specificed vaccines is required. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of the carrier departure. Proof of recovery is valid for 90 days instead of 6 months.

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    31.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add 19 countries to COVID-19 high-risk list, tighten entry restrictions from 23 January (SVI, 22.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    • Only EU and Schengen Associated residents, and travellers from designated low-risk countries, should enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers should provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries should only enter if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. 
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurence of COVID-19 variants. Except for German citizens and in rare cases, there is a ban on entry into Germany from virus variant areas.
    • Travellers arriving in Germany following a stay in a designated area of high-risk are required to home quarantine for 10 days. As an alternative to proof of vaccination or recovery, they can provide a negative PCR test (carried out no more than 72 hours before entry) or an antigen test (carried out no more than 48 hours before entry).
    • Travellers approved for entry after a stay in an area of variant concern are required to home quarantine for 14 days. If using a carrier for entry, they should provide a PCR test result that must be less than 48 hours old at the time of the (scheduled) start of the journey.
    • Furthermore, the German authorities may require travellers to take additional tests after entering the Federal Republic, in particular at their point of arrival (e.g. at the airport).
    • Children younger than 12 years may end their quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or test result: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (as of 15 January, in the case of Janssen/Johnson & Johnson a second dose of one of the specificed vaccines is required. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose).
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before the actual time or scheduled time of the carrier departure. Proof of recovery is valid for 90 days instead of 6 months.

    Learn more

    Federal Ministry of Health

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    28.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add 19 countries to COVID-19 high-risk list, tighten entry restrictions from 23 January (SVI, 22.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Robert Koch Institute

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules 

    • Only residents in EU and Schengen Associated countries, and citizens and travellers from low-risk countries, can enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers must provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries will only be approved entry if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel.
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurrence of COVID-19 variants. 
    • Depending on their country of departure, and regardless of their vaccination status, travellers who have stayed in international risk areas must be either fully vaccinated or provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. They are required to quarantine for 14 days on arrival. 

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or a test result:

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before departure
    • Travellers arriving from high-risk or virus variant areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form.
    • If arriving from a high-risk area, travellers must produce an antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before entry.
    • If arriving from a virus variant area, travellers must possess a PCR test taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. For these travellers, proof of vaccination or recovery and an antigen test result are considered insufficient.

    To learn more about current measures, travellers should also consult Germany’s Federal Foreign Office, the Robert Koch Institute and and the National Tourist Board.

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    27.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add several countries to its COVID-19 high-risk list, remove Ukraine (Schengen Visa Info, 08.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Robert Koch Institute

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country. This means that people who change planes at airports in Germany must also provide proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules 

    • Only residents in EU and Schengen Associated countries, and citizens and travellers from low-risk countries, can enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers must provide the documents listed below. Travellers from all other countries will only be approved entry if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel.
    • Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s classification of international risk areas: high-risk areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the spread of COVID-19; virus variant areas are where there is a high risk of infection due to the widespread occurrence of COVID-19 variants. 
    • Depending on their country of departure, and regardless of their vaccination status, travellers who have stayed in international risk areas must be either fully vaccinated or provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. They are required to quarantine for 14 days on arrival. 

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or a test result:

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before departure
    • Travellers arriving from high-risk or virus variant areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form.
    • If arriving from a high-risk area, travellers must produce an antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before entry.
    • If arriving from a virus variant area, travellers must possess a PCR test taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. For these travellers, proof of vaccination or recovery and an antigen test result are considered insufficient.

    To learn more about current measures, travellers should also consult Germany’s Federal Foreign Office, the Robert Koch Institute and and the National Tourist Board.

    ______________________

    You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

    You can also find information about your passenger rights on our portal for citizens.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    18.01.2022
  • Germany Travellers from 35 more world countries will be subject to stricter entry restrictions when travelling to Germany, starting from Sunday, January 16, as these countries have been added to the high-risk list.

    Reporting on the COVID-19 situation abroad, on Friday, January 14, the German agency for disease prevention and control, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), has added the following 35 countries to the high-risk list:

    Albania
    Antigua and Barbuda
    Equatorial Guinea
    Benin
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Bulgaria
    Burkina Faso
    Costa Rica
    The Dominican Republic
    Djibouti
    Eritrea
    France – the French overseas territory of St. Pierre and Miquelon
    The Gambia
    Guinea-Bissau
    Guyana
    Colombia
    Latvia
    Liberia
    Madagascar
    The Netherlands – the overseas part of the Kingdom of St. Martin’s Netherlands
    Niger
    Northern Macedonia
    Austria – with the exception of the communities of Mittelberg and Jungholz and the Riss Valley in the community of Vomp and Eben am Achensee
    Peru
    The Philippines
    Saint Kitts and Nevis
    Lucia
    Vincent and the Grenadines
    Sao Tome and Principe
    Senegal
    Serbia
    Somalia
    Suriname
    Chad
    The Central African Republic

    Only last week, a total of 39 world countries had been added to Germany’s list of high-risk areas, amongst which Australia, Estonia, Iceland, Sweden, Rwanda, and the United Arab Emirates.

    Travellers from countries from areas categorized as high-risk are subject to additional travel restrictions. According to the RKI, everyone is obliged to register at einreiseanmeldung.de and carry the confirmation with them when entering Germany.

    “The confirmation will be checked by the carrier and may also be checked by the Federal Police within the framework of its responsibilities as a border control agency,” the agency explains.

    At the same time, all travellers from high-risk areas aged six or over must present a negative test result or proof of vaccination or recovery in order to be eligible to enter the country.

    “Travellers who spent time in a risk area must make their way directly to their home upon arrival and remain isolated there for a period of ten days (home quarantine),” the RKI also notes while explaining that quarantine can be ended once the travellers update their proof of vaccination or recovery at einreiseanmeldung.de. If the proof is uploaded before reaching Germany, no quarantine is needed.

    However, those entering Germany on the basis of a COVID-19 test cannot end quarantine earlier than on the fifth day of isolation, when they should test again. They can only leave quarantine after the negative test results are out and updated at einreiseanmeldung.de.

    The expansion of the COVID-19 high-risk list has happened due to the widespread of the Omicron virus variant. As a more transmissible variant, Omicron has caused the number of COVID-19 cases to spike up worldwide.

    Data by the World Health Organization (WHO) show that Germany alone has recorded 381,568 new COVID-19 cases in the last seven days. The number of new COVID-19 cases reported within the same period worldwide is 18,493,799.

    Read more
    17.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add several countries to its COVID-19 high-risk list, remove Ukraine (Schengen Visa Info, 08.01.2022).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are accepted if they meet the same requirements listed. 

    Entry requirements also depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas.

    Travellers who have visited high-risk or virus variant countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before arrival. They must also furnish either an antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before entry (high-risk), or a PCR test taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point (virus variant). 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Since flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country, the regulations concerning entry into Germany also apply to people who solely change flights at a German airport. This means that people who do change planes now also need to furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    Only residents in EU and Schengen Associated countries, and citizens and travellers from low-risk countries, can enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers must provide the documents listed below. 

    Travellers from all other countries will only be approved for entry if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. For these travellers, entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas:

    • Travellers who have visited high-risk or virus variant countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form.
    • Travellers arriving from a high-risk country/area must produce an antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before entry.
    • Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must possess a PCR test result taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. Proof of vaccination or recovery and antigen test results are no longer regarded as sufficient.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result:

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before departure, as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    To learn more about current measures, travellers should also consult Germany’s Federal Foreign Office and the National Tourist Board.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    12.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities add several countries to its COVID-19 high-risk list, remove Ukraine (Schengen Visa Info, 08.01.2022). Authorities to remove U.K. and eight African countries from virus variant areas list from 4 January (SVI, 31.12.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are accepted if they meet the same requirements listed. 

    Entry requirements also depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas.

    Travellers who have visited high-risk or virus variant countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before arrival. They must also furnish either an antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before entry (high-risk), or a PCR test taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point (virus variant). 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Since flight transfers at airports are now classed as entries into a country, the regulations concerning entry into Germany also apply to people who solely change flights at a German airport. This means that people who do change planes now also need to furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    Only residents in EU and Schengen Associated countries, and citizens and travellers from low-risk countries, can enter Germany for tourism or non-essential reasons. These travellers must provide the documents listed below. 

    Travellers from all other countries will only be approved for entry if they are fully vaccinated or can provide proof of an important or urgent need to travel. For these travellers, entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas:

    • Travellers who have visited high-risk or virus variant countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form.
    • Travellers arriving from a high-risk country/area must produce an antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before entry.
    • Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must possess a PCR test result taken no more than 48 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. Proof of vaccination or recovery and antigen test results are no longer regarded as sufficient.

    Mandatory travel documents

    All travellers over the age of six must furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result:

    • Proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Ehrlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, Novavax, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Negative result to a PCR test taken no earlier than 48 hours before departure, as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    To learn more about current measures, travellers should also consult Germany’s Federal Foreign Office and the National Tourist Board.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    11.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities to remove U.K. and eight African countries from virus variant areas list from 4 January (SVI, 31.12.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are accepted if they meet the same requirements listed. 

    Entry requirements also depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas.

    Travellers who have visited high-risk or virus variant countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form before arrival. They must also furnish either an antigen test result taken no more than 48 hours before entry (high-risk), or a PCR test taken no more than 48 hours before the actual or scheduled time of carrier departure (virus variant). 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Travellers arriving by land or sea who intend to immediately travel onwards to another country are not required to register their entry online. 

    In the case of border traffic, travellers who have spent less than 24 hours in a high risk or virus variant country/area and intend to be in Germany for less than 24 hours hours are exempt from quarantine. 

    Travellers in transit who are older than 12 years arriving from high risk or virus variant countries/areas are required to present a negative COVID-19 test at the border, plus proof of full vaccination and recovery.

    Transit by air

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state or another Schengen state as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country 

    Under these conditions, citizens of countries outside of the EU may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to a country outside of the EU if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The traveller must provide evidence on entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    *From Third Countries:

    Travellers are required to provide proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result. These documents must be presented before travellers begin their journey: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk and virus variant countries and areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form:

    • If coming from a high risk country/area, they must provide the results of an antigen (48 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.
    • Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must provide the results of an antigen (24 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.

    Depending on their country of departure, certain travellers may be required to self-isolate on arrival. 

    Travellers from South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho face restricted entry. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even vaccinated travellers must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival regardless of their test results.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    07.01.2022
  • Germany Latest News: German government adds Portugal, Spain, U.S. to list of COVID-19 risk areas; Austria removed from list (Reuters, 23.12.2021). German authorities impose additional entry restrictions on travelers from U.K., eight African countries because of COVID-19 (Schengen Visa Info 23.12.2021) Authorities ease entry restrictions for travelers from Armenia, Iran, Mongolia, Philippines and Romania (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk and virus variant countries and areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form:

    • If coming from a high risk country/area, they must provide the results of an antigen (48 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.
    • Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must provide the results of an antigen (24 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.

    Depending on their country of departure, certain travellers may be required to self-isolate on arrival. 

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Travellers arriving by land or sea who intend to immediately travel onwards to another country are not required to register their entry online. 

    In the case of border traffic, travellers who have spent less than 24 hours in a high risk or virus variant country/area and intend to be in Germany for less than 24 hours hours are exempt from quarantine. 

    Travellers in transit who are older than 12 years arriving from high risk or virus variant countries/areas are required to present a negative COVID-19 test at the border, plus proof of full vaccination and recovery.

    Transit by air

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state or another Schengen state as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country 

    Under these conditions, citizens of countries outside of the EU may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to a country outside of the EU if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The traveller must provide evidence on entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    *From Third Countries:

    Travellers are required to provide proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result. These documents must be presented before travellers begin their journey: 

    • Proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • Negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • Certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk and virus variant countries and areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form:

    • If coming from a high risk country/area, they must provide the results of an antigen (48 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.
    • Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must provide the results of an antigen (24 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.

    Depending on their country of departure, certain travellers may be required to self-isolate on arrival. 

    Travellers from South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho face restricted entry. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even vaccinated travellers must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival regardless of their test results.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    27.12.2021
  • Germany Starting from today, December 23, travellers from the United Kingdom and another eight countries categorized as virus variant areas by the German authorities are subject to additional entry restrictions when reaching the territory of Germany.

    While there is a ban in place on transport to and from countries in which virus mutations are widespread – which are the UK, Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa – there are some categories of travellers that are exempt from the ban and permitted to enter the German territory.

    Here are included German citizens and people with residence and existing right of residence in Germany, as well as their spouses, their partners from the same household and their underage children, and some other special cases.

    According to the German Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in addition to having to show proof that they qualify to enter the country, these people are now obliged to present negative results of a COVID-19 test before reaching Germany.

    “Since December 23, 2021, people aged six and over have been required to carry proof of COVID with them when entering Germany. People aged six and over must have a test certificate or a recovery certificate or vaccination certificate when entering Germany,” the Ministry explains.

    It also notes that the test results must be of a COVID-19 test, either antigen or PCR, taken within the last 48 hours.

    Air travellers who are passing through Germany in transit to their destination country from one of the virus variant countries are also subject to the requirement of negative results of a COVID-19 test.

    “Proof of test or proof of recovery or proof of vaccination must be presented to carriers for review prior to travel. Only in cross-border rail traffic or in cross-border short sea shipping can the submission be made during transport. The proof must also be presented to the German border authorities upon entry upon request,” the Ministry of Foreign Affairs explains.

    After entering Germany, travellers from virus variant areas are obliged to undergo self-isolation for a period of two weeks, which cannot be shortened.

    Read more
    24.12.2021
  • Germany Germany has added three more Schengen Area countries, one European microstate, and a third country to its list of high-risk areas, in a decision announced on Friday.

    According to the Robert Koch Institute, which is the German agency for disease prevention and control, starting from Sunday, December 19, Andorra, Denmark (including the Faroe Islands and Greenland), France (including the overseas department of Réunion), Lebanon, and Norway, will be part of the high-risk list.

    The decision means that unvaccinated and unrecovered travellers from these countries are now subject to stricter entry restrictions, including negative results of a COVID-19 test, taken pre-departure, and quarantine on arrival.

    The move has been taken following an increase in the number of cases in all these countries, including the number of Omicron cases. Data by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) shows that Norway alone has reported 1,792 Omicron cases, Denmark 383, and France 170, out of the 3,158 Omicron cases reported in the EU and EEA countries.

    “The list below for the classification of risk areas is effective from Sunday, December 19, 2021, at 12:00 a.m. The classification of risk areas can change at short notice. Please check immediately before departure whether the countries in which you have stayed in the last ten days before entering Germany are classified as risk areas,” the RKI advises.

    At the same time, the RKI has dropped the following countries from the high-risk list upon a decrease in the rates of COVID-19 cases in the territory of the same:

    Albania
    Bulgaria
    Estonia
    Latvia
    Northern Macedonia
    Republic of Moldova
    Unvaccinated and unrecovered travellers from these countries will now have it easier to enter Germany, as they no longer have to double-test in order to avoid quarantine.

    The list of virus variant areas remains unchanged, with Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa still part of it.

    “Before you leave (your country of departure), please be prepared that your carrier (e.g. airline) will request a current PCR test from you before you travel if you are/have been in a virus variant area for the last ten days prior to entry,” the RKI reminds travellers.

    It also points out that upon arrival from a virus variant area, PCR tests will be arranged by the health authorities at the airport or at the location of isolation/quarantine. A quarantine period of 14 days is also obligatory and cannot be shortened.

    Read more
    20.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities ease entry restrictions for travelers from Armenia, Iran, Mongolia, Philippines and Romania (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following: 

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk and virus variant countries and areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. If coming from a high risk country/area, they must provide the results of an antigen (48 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test. Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must provide the results of an antigen (24 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.

    Depending on their country of departure, certain travellers may be required to self-isolate on arrival. 

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Travellers arriving by land or sea who intend to immediately travel onwards to another country are not required to register their entry online. 

    In the case of border traffic, travellers who have spent less than 24 hours in a high risk or virus variant country/area and intend to be in Germany for less than 24 hours hours are exempt from quarantine. 

    Travellers in transit who are older than 12 years arriving from high risk or virus variant countries/areas are required to present a negative COVID-19 test at the border, plus proof of full vaccination and recovery.

    Transit by air

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state or another Schengen state as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country 

    Under these conditions, citizens of countries outside of the EU may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    Citizens of countries outside of the EU may enter Germany to travel to a country outside of the EU if the following conditions are met:

    • the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    • the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The traveller must provide evidence on entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. 

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    *From Third Countries:

    Travellers are required to provide proof of vaccination, recovery or a negative test result. These documents must be presented before travellers begin their journey: 

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institute are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk and virus variant countries and areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. If coming from a high risk country/area, they must provide the results of an antigen (48 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test. Travellers arriving from a virus variant country/area must provide the results of an antigen (24 hours) or PCR (72 hours) test.

    Depending on their country of departure, certain travellers may be required to self-isolate on arrival. 

    Travellers from South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho face restricted entry. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even vaccinated travellers must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival regardless of their test results.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    National Tourist Board

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    17.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities ease entry restrictions for travelers from Armenia, Iran, Mongolia, Philippines and Romania (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Robert Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately travel onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for up to 24 hours are exempted from quarantine. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a high varient area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result, proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Travellers passing through airports en route from one Schengen-area destination to another are exempted from testing, proof of vaccination and quarantine. Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. The rules only apply to travellers arriving from and departing for non-Schengen-area countries.

    Travellers who need to leave the international transit area of an airport must follow the rules and produce the necessary documentation.

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from a designated high risk country/area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arrriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival.

    Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry their documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Robert Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    16.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities ease entry restrictions for travelers from Armenia, Iran, Mongolia, Philippines and Romania (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Robert Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately travel onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for up to 24 hours are exempted from quarantine. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a high varient area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result, proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Travellers passing through airports en route from one Schengen-area destination to another are exempted from testing, proof of vaccination and quarantine. Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. The rules only apply to travellers arriving from and departing for non-Schengen-area countries.

    Travellers who need to leave the international transit area of an airport must follow the rules and produce the necessary documentation.

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from a designated high risk country/area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arrriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival.

    Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry their documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Robert Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    15.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities impose stricter entry restrictions for travelers from Jordan, Lichtenstein, Mauritius, Poland and Switzerland (SVI, 04.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately travel onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for up to 24 hours are exempted from quarantine. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a high varient area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result, proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Travellers passing through airports en route from one Schengen-area destination to another are exempted from testing, proof of vaccination and quarantine. Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. The rules only apply to travellers arriving from and departing for non-Schengen-area countries.

    Travellers who need to leave the international transit area of an airport must follow the rules and produce the necessary documentation.

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from a designated high risk country/area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arrriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival.

    Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry their documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    09.12.2021
  • Germany Unvaccinated travellers from Switzerland, Poland, Lichtenstein, Jordan and Mauritius will face stricter entry rules when travelling to Germany starting from next Sunday, December 5, as all five have been included in Germany’s list of high-risk areas.

    The decision has been announced by the German health agency for disease prevention and control, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), today, on December 3, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “Travellers who spent time in a high-risk area must carry with them a test result or proof of vaccination or recovery and if demanded by the carrier, present such proof for the purpose of carriage. In case of a stay in an area of variants of concern, only a test result is admitted,” the RKI notes, explaining the rules of entry for those reaching Germany from a high-risk area.

    It also points out that the proof for the purpose of travel, as well as the proof of vaccination, recovery or test results, should be uploaded at the digital entry registration portal einreiseanmeldung.de. Those who register through this portal will receive the registration confirmation in their email, which they should carry with them printed or digitally when reaching Germany.

    Travellers from high-risk areas are also subject to the obligation of quarantine. However, those who upload proof of recovery or vaccination against the virus are not subject to it. Those who enter the country with test results, on the other hand, can leave quarantine only on the fifth day if they test for COVID-19 and result negative again.

    “If you spent time in a high-risk area prior to entry, the relevant test might not be conducted earlier than five days after entry (test to release possible from day five following entry),” the RKI explains.

    Updating the list of high-risk countries, the RKI has also removed Uzbekistan, Thailand, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines from the list, which means that travellers from these countries to Germany are not subject to the restrictions mentioned above. The same are, however, obliged to register before travel to Germany.

    The list of virus variant areas has remained unchanged since last week and consists of:

    Botswana
    Eswatini
    Lesotho
    Malawi
    Mozambique
    Namibia
    Zimbabwe
    South Africa

    Read more
    06.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated high risk countries/areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately travel onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for up to 24 hours are exempted from quarantine. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a high varient area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result, proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Travellers passing through airports en route from one Schengen-area destination to another are exempted from testing, proof of vaccination and quarantine. Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. The rules only apply to travellers arriving from and departing for non-Schengen-area countries.

    Travellers who need to leave the international transit area of an airport must follow the rules and produce the necessary documentation.

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from a designated high risk country/area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must complete a test no earlier than 48 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Travellers arrriving from virus variant countries/areas must be tested no earlier than 24 hours (antigen) or 72 hours (PCR). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival.

    Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry their documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    01.12.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary and Laos (SVI, 12.11.2021). German authorities allow unvaccinated American nationals to enter country under facilitated rules from 14 November (SVI, 12.11.2021). Authorities ease entry restrictions for six countries, three Dutch overseas territories from 7 November (SVI, 06.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from designated risk areas must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. They must also complete an antigen test (24 hours) or PCR test (72 hours). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately travel onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for up to 24 hours are exempted from quarantine. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a high varient area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result, proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Travellers passing through airports en route from one Schengen-area destination to another are exempted from testing, proof of vaccination and quarantine. Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. The rules only apply to travellers arriving from and departing for non-Schengen-area countries.

    Travellers who need to leave the international transit area of an airport must follow the rules and produce the necessary documentation.

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel Alert

    Due to the spread of a new coronavirus variant in southern Africa, the German government is drastically restricting entry from eight countries in the region: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only German citizens can enter from these countries. Even those who are vaccinated must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and regardless of their test results.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers coming from a designated risk area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. Depending on where they come from, they may be required to take an antigen test (24 hours) or PCR test (72 hours). Certain travellers may need to self-isolate on arrival.

    Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose or single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZenica, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Paul Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Children below 12 years may end quarantine after 5 days without submitting proof of a negative test result.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry their documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office 

    Paul Erhlich Institut

    Paul Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    29.11.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary and Laos (SVI, 12.11.2021). German authorities allow unvaccinated American nationals to enter country under facilitated rules from 14 November (SVI, 12.11.2021). Authorities ease entry restrictions for six countries, three Dutch overseas territories from 7 November (SVI, 06.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Bulgaria, Cameroon, Croatia, Republic of the Congo, Singapore (SVI, 23.10.2021).
    *From within the EU:

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose and single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Entry requirements also depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers arriving from a designated risk area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. Depending on where they come from, they may be required to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry these documents with them at all times.

    Children below 12 years are exempt from testing requirements.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    Robert Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Proof of transit or a stay of maximum 24 hours is required. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore, these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the selected requirements for entry, regarding testing proof, proof of recovery, or proof of full vaccination, must be folowed.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers arriving from a designated risk area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. Depending on where they come from, they may be required to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose and single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson/Janssen.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry these documents with them at all times.

    Children below 12 years are exempt from testing requirements.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    Robert Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    26.11.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary and Laos (SVI, 12.11.2021). German authorities allow unvaccinated American nationals to enter country under facilitated rules from 14 November (SVI, 12.11.2021). Authorities ease entry restrictions for six countries, three Dutch overseas territories from 7 November (SVI, 06.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Bulgaria, Cameroon, Croatia, Republic of the Congo, Singapore (SVI, 23.10.2021).
    **From within the EU:

    Travellers are required to provide one of the following:

    • proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose and single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institute.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months prior.

    Entry requirements also depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas . Travellers arriving from a designated risk area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. Depending on where they come from, they may be required to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry these documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    Robert Koch Institut

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Proof of transit or a stay of maximum 24 hours is required. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore, these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the selected requirements for entry, regarding testing proof, proof of recovery, or proof of full vaccination, must be folowed.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry requirements depend on the country of departure according to Germany’s national classification of risk areas. Travellers arriving from a designated risk area must complete the Digital Registration on Entry form. Depending on where they come from, they may be required to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Documents proving vaccination, test or recovery must be presented before travellers embark on their journey:

    • proof of vaccination completed at least 14 days after receiving the full vaccination. Double dose and single dose vaccines authorised by the Paul Erhlich Institut are accepted.
    • negative result to a PCR test as defined by the Robert Koch Institut.
    • COVID-19 certificate of recovery showing a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than six months previously.

    Visitors to Germany are reminded to carry these documents with them at all times.

    Learn more:

    Federal Foreign Office

    Robert Koch Institut

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    24.11.2021
  • Germany Travellers From Which Countries Are Permitted to Enter Germany?
    Based on the data provided by the German Federal Ministry of Interior, Building and Home Affairs, entry to Germany is permitted to European Union Member States and Schengen-associated countries, including Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein.

    Travellers from the EU and Schengen Area countries placed on the “high incidence areas” list must register online and provide a negative COVID-19 test result carried within 48 hours before arrival in Germany. Additionally, they will be required to stay self-isolated for ten days.

    Travellers from EU and Schengen Area countries placed in the “risk areas” are subject to the same restrictions as those mentioned above.

    Nonetheless, travellers from these areas who provide proof of vaccination against the COVID-19 or proof of recovery are allowed to skip testing and quarantine requirements.

    For those who are required to provide a negative PCR test, the result should not be older than 72 hours. The testing certificate is recognised if available in either German, English, French, Italian, or Spanish.

    For vaccinated persons, the vaccination certificate is recognised in the same languages. The approved vaccine doses by Germany include Comirnaty, Moderna, Vaxzevria, and Janssen, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    In addition, based on the EU Council’s recommendation, travellers from the following third countries and regions are allowed to enter Germany restriction-free:

    Argentina
    Australia
    Bahrain
    Chile
    Hongkong
    Jordan
    Canada
    Qatar
    Colombia
    Kuwait
    Macau
    Namibia
    New Zealand
    Peru
    Rwanda
    Saudi Arabia
    South Korea
    Taiwan
    Uruguay
    United Arab Emirates
    China – as soon as the mutual entry possibility is determined
    “Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they serve in an important role or if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated,” the Ministry’s statement notes.

    Arrivals From Highly Affected Countries
    In order to make a simpler distinction between COVID-19 affected countries, Germany has established a system that separates countries and regions into different areas, more precisely into virus variant areas and high-risk areas.

    “As of August 1, 2021, risk areas only distinguish between two categories: High-risk areas and areas of variants of concern. The category of “basic” risk area no longer applies. The cessation of the “basic” risk area category does not mean that there is no longer any risk of infection during stays in these areas. An appreciably increased risk of infection currently exists worldwide,” the statement of the German authorities reads.

    Which Countries Are Considered as Profoundly Affected by COVID-19?
    High-risk areas list consists of countries with more than 100 infections per 100,000 inhabitants during the last seven days. Consequently, stringent rules apply to arrivals from countries placed on this list when entering Germany.

    The following EU/EEA countries are currently part of Germany’s high-risk list:

    Austria – with the exception of the municipality of Mittelberg and Jungholz and Rißtal in the municipal area of Vomp and Eben am Achensee (high-risk area since November 14, 2021)
    Belgium (high-risk area since November 21 2021)
    Bulgaria (high-risk area since October 24 2021)
    Croatia (high-risk area since October 24 2021)
    Czech Republic (high-risk area since November 14 2021)
    Estonia (high-risk area since October 10 2021)
    Greece (high-risk area since November 21 2021)
    Hungary (high-risk area since November 14 2021)
    Ireland (high-risk area since November 21 2021)
    Latvia (high-risk area since October 10 2021)
    Lithuania (high-risk area since October 1 2021)
    Netherlands – excluding Sint Maarten, Aruba and Curaçao – (high-risk area since November 21 2021)
    Romania (high-risk area since October 1 2021)
    Slovakia (high-risk area since October 31 2021)
    Slovenia (high-risk area since September 26 2021)
    Virus variant areas consist of countries in which COVID-19 mutations have widely spread and are being transmitted at a fast rate.

    “There is a ban on transport to countries in which virus mutations are widespread (so-called virus variant areas). Transport companies, e.g.Airlines or train companies, are not allowed to transport people from these countries to Germany,” the statement of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reads, though there are no countries listed under this category for now.

    Since Germany’s virus variant areas list currently does not include any country, except for the countries mentioned above, the high-risk list includes all the other third countries.

    Entry Rules for Arrivals From High-Risk & Virus Variant Areas
    All persons wishing to enter Germany after staying for more than ten days in a high incidence of virus variant area are required to present a negative COVID-19 test result, proof of vaccination against the virus, or proof of recovery. Nonetheless, certain exceptions apply to persons who have travelled through high-risk areas without making a stop.

    If travelling using air transportation, a negative Coronavirus test result should be provided before departure and another one upon entry. The airlines are responsible for checking the negative test result documentation before departure. The same rules also apply to those travelling by train, bus, or ferry.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area are also required to fill in a digital entry registration form and carry the received confirmation code.

    In addition, all travellers from high-risk areas and virus variant areas must register online and prove their registration upon their arrival in Germany. They are also required to download the Corona-Warn App and will be subject to health screening as soon as they enter German territory.

    Who Is Required to Quarantine?
    When deciding to travel to Germany, it should be noted that entry requirements depend on the country tourists are travelling from.

    The quarantine requirement in Germany applies to all persons who have stayed in a high-risk area, or a virus variant area within the last ten days. Everyone coming from these areas is obliged to go to their accommodation immediately after arrival and stay self-isolated for ten days. However, those coming from virus variant areas have to stay self-isolated for 14 days instead of ten.

    The quarantine period can be ended earlier for those entering Germany from a high-risk area if they present a negative COVID-19 test result taken on or after the fifth day of self-isolation.

    During the self-isolation period, no one is allowed to leave their accommodation or receive visitors.

    Nonetheless, the following categories of people are exempt from the quarantine requirement:

    Those who travelled through high risk or high incidence areas without making any stopovers
    Those travelling using the territory of Germany as a transit country
    Persons who have stayed in a risk area for less than 24 hours or who leave Germany within 24 hours of entry
    It should be noted that travel restrictions in individual states of Germany differ from one another, and they can change at any time. Thus, the authorities suggest that everyone does their own research before deciding to travel to different parts of Germany. Entry conditions and quarantine requirements are also applied differently in other parts of the country.

    It is suggested that all persons wishing to travel to Germany or any other country during the COVID-19 pandemic purchase an extended travel insurance package that covers pandemic and epidemic situations.

    Travel insurance for Germany ensures that in case the trip gets cancelled due to the Coronavirus, most of the money spent to make reservations is saved.

    Germany’s EU Digital COVID-19 Passport
    Germany joined the EU gateway successfully on May 10 after passing the technical tests. Weeks ahead of the July roll-out programme across the bloc. On June 1, Germany started issuing the first vaccination certificates for travellers.

    “EU citizens are looking forward to travelling again, and they want to do so safely. Having an EU certificate is a crucial step on the way,” Commissioner of EU Stella Kyriakides said in this regard.

    The EU COVID-19 Vaccination Passport has been established by the EU in order to restore freedom of travel within the bloc.

    Currently, the majority of places, including different attractions, restaurants, and hotels, are open for tourists in Germany. However, since each German federal state has its own COVID-19 rules, it is suggested that everyone does their research before deciding to travel to Germany.

    A large share of attractions such as museums and other historic sites are open for tourists. Nonetheless, everyone should keep in mind that masks are required in indoor spaces. COVID-19 vaccination, recovery from the virus or test results are required in a large part of the country to access these places.

    The same is required for access to restaurants. Masks should be worn at all times when entering or leaving the restaurants, as well as everyone, should keep a distance of two metres.

    Germany’s leading and busiest airports, including the airport of Berlin Brandenburg, Frankfurt, Munich, Dusseldorf, and Hamburg, are open and international flights have started to operate.

    Currently, there isn’t any national curfew in place, but it is up to the federal states to impose and keep individual curfews in place. Additionally, everyone is required to keep their mask on in public areas and respect the social distancing rules.

    Current COVID-19 Situation in Germany
    As one of the European countries that the pandemic has hardly hit, Germany has managed to keep the Coronavirus situation under control by imposing strict measures when needed.

    As of November 21, Germany has identified 5,248,291 COVID-19 infection cases, with 52,970 of them being reported only during the last 24 hours. In addition, until now the country has registered 98,739 deaths.

    According to the figures provided by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Germany has so far fully vaccinated 67.5 per cent of its population.

    Read more
    22.11.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities lift entry ban for travelers from Argentina, Colombia, Namibia and Peru (SVI, 02.11.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    Authorities tighten entry restrictions for travelers from Bulgaria, Cameroon, Croatia, Republic of the Congo, Singapore (SVI, 23.10.2021).
    *From within the EU:

    Overview – general information:

    Germany classifies areas as: “high incidence” or “virus variant”, areas. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    All travellers entering Germany have to provide a negative test result or proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery, independent from where they arrive. 

    Children under 12 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    Information on entry rules for Germany is available at: auswaertiges-amt.de

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry. For children under 12 years self-isolation ends automatically after 5 days.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “virus variant areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Proof of transit or a stay of maximum 24 hours is required. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore, these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the selected requirements for entry, regarding testing proof, proof of recovery, or proof of full vaccination, must be folowed.

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    05.11.2021
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