Cheap Flights Open for travel Telegram bot
[We have 50 restrictions for 243 countries and regions]

Germany travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -131.62%
Open for citizens: partial Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates
Published on 22.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Leisure travel flight bookings via direct booking connectivity to Lufthansa Group continue to increase.

Published on 21.10.2021, Lufthansa, easyjet:

Lufthansa, easyJet win EU court backing to buy Air Berlin assets.

Published on 20.10.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair hub Frankfurt-Hahn Airport files for bankruptcy.

Published on 13.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa recommends four hours for check-in at Berlin Brandenburg airport

Published on 12.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa repays 1.5 bln euros of state aid after cash call.

Published on 08.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa is trialling the removal of complimentary spirits in economy and premium economy class for long haul services, only free beer and wine.

Published on 08.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Why Lufthansa’s CEO is behind flight price increases.

Published on 07.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Cuts Free Liquor In Long Haul Economy.

Published on 04.10.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa adds over 130 Flights from Frankfurt and Munich for Autumn travel.

Published on 01.10.2021, Eurowings:

Eurowings to fly from Hamburg to Beirut, from 07NOV21.

Published on 29.09.2021, Condor:

Condor flies between Frankfurt to New York City, from 11NOV21.

Published on 28.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Prepared for Travel Ramp-Up in December, APAC VP Says.

Published on 28.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Demand for Lufthansa flights to U.S. soars on re-opening.

Published on 23.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Amadeus signs up Lufthansa for digital health pass integration.

Published on 22.09.2021, Germany:

Lufthansa Sees 40% Jump In Booking On Week After U.S. Ended 20-month Travel Ban.

Published on 22.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Sees 40% Jump In Booking On Week After U.S. Ended 20-month Travel Ban.

Published on 20.09.2021, Germany:

Lufthansa launches $2.5 bln capital increase to repay state bailout.

Published on 20.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa launches $2.5 bln capital increase to repay state bailout.

Published on 16.09.2021, Eurowings:

Eurowings plans significant expansion.

Published on 16.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa putting on more business flights.

Published on 13.09.2021, TUI:

TUI cancels more flights, holidays to 'green' and 'amber' lists countries until late Oct-21, early Nov-21 because of COVID-19

Published on 07.09.2021, Lufthansa:

Lufthansa Does Not Expect U.S. Entry Bans to be Eased Before Jan-22

Published on 02.09.2021, Eurowings:

Eurowings flies to Ukraine for the first time, from Düsseldorf to Kiev

Published on 17.08.2021, Eurowings:

Eurowings launches new base in Prague with 11 routes for winter 2021-2022

Published on 11.08.2021, Eurowings:

Lufthansa's Eurowings Discover airline commences operations to Namibia

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Germany
Crossing Rules

Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Czechia, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Iran, Israel, Kosovo, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Montenegro, Namibia, North Macedonia, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, United States
Passengers entering Germany from Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Colombia, Czechia, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Eswatini (Swaziland), Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Kosovo (Rep.), Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Lithuania, Malawi, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, North Macedonia (Rep.), Palestinian Territory, Panama, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, USA, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result. The test must have been taken at most 48 hours before arrival. Tests accepted are: Antigen, PCR, RT-LAMP and TMA tests. The certificate must be in English, French or German.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 6 years.

Entry restrictions
Passengers arriving from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), Ireland (Rep.), Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Portugal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Germany after 17 March 2020.
– This does not apply to passengers with a long term “D” visa issued by Germany.
– This does not apply to passengers with a long term “D” visa issued by Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to students.
– This does not apply to unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a copy of the identity document of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

Passengers entering Germany from a country other than Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Colombia, Czechia, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Eswatini (Swaziland), Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Kosovo (Rep.), Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Lithuania, Malawi, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, North Macedonia (Rep.), Palestinian Territory, Panama, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, USA, Zambia or Zimbabwe are subject to a Coronavirus (COVID-19) test upon arrival.

Passengers and airline crew arriving from high risk countries must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

More Coronavirus (COVID-19) related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html

Ban entry for passengers who arrive from or have been in Botswana, Brazil, Ireland, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Portugal, South Africa, Swaziland, United Kingdom, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Passengers arriving from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), Ireland (Rep.), Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Portugal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter.

Passengers entering Germany from Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Colombia, Czechia, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Eswatini (Swaziland), Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Kosovo (Rep.), Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Lithuania, Malawi, Mexico, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, North Macedonia (Rep.), Palestinian Territory, Panama, Portugal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, USA, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result. The test must have been taken at most 48 hours before arrival. Tests accepted are: Antigen, PCR, RT-LAMP and TMA tests. The certificate must be in English, French or German.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 6 years.

Quarantine is possible
Passengers arriving from a country other than Brazil, Ireland (Rep.), South Africa or United Kingdom without a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) test result could be subject to a PCR test upon arrival and quarantine for 10 days. Tests accepted are: Antigen, LAMP, NAAT, PCR and TMA tests. More information can be found at www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/coronavirus-infos-reisende/faq-tests-entering-germany.html

More Coronavirus (COVID-19) related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html

Read more
Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

Free movement of people. Instruction to keep 1.5m distance between people and to wear the mask in public transport and shops. AHA+H+L rule applies (see Other below). Fines are applied for those refusing to wear masks. Restrictions to be introduced if the number of new infections reaches 35/100.000 in the last 7 days (see Other below).

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 08 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Since 8 August travelers returning to Germany from risk areas need to provide either a negative test result which is not older than 48h or undergo a test within 10 days after arrival. Quarantine is mandatory until negative test result is received. Since 15 September tests are not anymore for free. As risk areas are defined areas in which the number of cases during the last 7 days is above 50 per 100.000 inhabitants. The list is maintained by Robert Koch Institute (see link below). Random controls of measures. From 1 October quarantine can be ended at the earliest 5 days after a negative test result.
Information of travelers using airplanes or ships are recorded at arrival in Germany.
It is generally recommended to not travel to risk areas.

Read more
Flight Restrictions

published 27.11.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.

– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.

– This does not apply to passengers with a long term visa issued by EEA Member States or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued by Germany after 17 March 2020.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of British nationals. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship.
– This does not apply to passengers traveling as students if they cannot complete their study outside Germany.
– This does not apply to unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a copy of the identity document of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

Passengers arriving from high risk countries must register before departure at einreiseanmeldung.de

More Coronavirus (COVID-19) related information can be found at bundespolizei.de

Read more
Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation- subject to categorisation.

Entering this country with the EU Digital COVID certificate. Information on entry rules for Germany is available at: auswaertiges-amt.de
All travellers entering Germany have to provide a negative test result or proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery, independent from where they arrive. Children under 12 years old are exempted from testing requirements.
From 1 August 2021, risk areas will be designated in two categories: high-risk areas and virus variant areas. The category of “simple” risk areas is omitted. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.
– From high-risk area: Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to register at ww.einreiseanmeldung.de. and must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:
• proof of vaccination against COVID-19: Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson). Vaccinated and convalescents can end the quarantine from the moment the proof of vaccination or convalescence is transmitted via the entry portal. If the transmission takes place before entry (is strongly recommended), the quarantine does not have to be started;
• proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
• a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry. For children under 12 years self-isolation ends automatically after 5 days.

– From virus variant area: An exception to the quarantine obligation for fully vaccinated persons after previous stay in a virus variant area does not exist. When entering from so-called virus variant areas, a transport ban applies to passenger transport by train, bus, ship and flight from these countries. In the case of a previous stay in a virus variant area, it is generally fourteen days. Premature termination in virus variant areas is particularly sought if the affected virus variant area is downgraded during the separation period in Germany, the regulations for this type of area apply to the termination of the separation.

Read more
Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification subject to special conditions.
Entering this country with the EU Digital COVID certificate. Information on entry rules for Germany is available at: auswaertiges-amt.de
.
From 1 August 2021, risk areas will be designated in two categories: high-risk areas and virus variant areas. The category of “simple” risk areas is omitted. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-risk area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:
• proof of vaccination against COVID-19
Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
• proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
• a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry. For children under 12 years self-isolation ends automatically after 5 days.

For virus variant areas, the deadline for antigen tests is shortened to 24 hours.

Read more
Vaccination
COVID-19 Total Vaccination date: 2021-10-20
COVID-19 Total Vaccination: 110432440
COVID-19 Daily Vaccination: 125399
COVID-19 Vacc. (per 100 citizens, %): 131.62
COVID-19 Daily Vacc. (per 1 million citizens): 1495

THIS COUNTRY IS READY TO CONNECT TO THE EU DIGITAL COVID CERTIFICATE GATEWAY
Proof of vaccination against COVID-19
Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson).

Read more
Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

All shops are open under the condition that distance & sanitary measures are respected. End of May/beginning of June in most federal states theaters, cinemas, restaurants, gyms, swimming pools are reopening. In all states restaurants and bars are open (mandatory is registration of people and seating), restrictions to be introduced if the number of new infections reaches 35/100.000 in the last 7 days (see Other below).

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

If more than 35 new infections per 100.000 in one week reduction of nb of people who can meet to 25 for public-, 15 for private events.
If more than 50 new infections per 100.000 in one week reduction of nb of people who can meet to 10 in public areas and 10 from max 2 housholds in private locations. Number of participants to other events should then also not be >100 (exceptions on request are possible).
Big events (>500) are suspended until 31 December.

Read more
Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 03 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Distance and hygiene measures to be respected. Presence is organised in shifts. In addition, wearing masks in schools is recommended but in some states schools can decide.

Other

Other: partially closed/partially cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

35 new infections per 100.000 inhabitants is used as 1st threshold to start implementing stricter measures, from 50 new infections/100.000 measure should be more strict (so-called hotspot strategy is applied: mandatory curfew for bars at and no more alcohol served for outside consumption after 23.00, reduction of people who can meet to 10). Heavily debated is that some regions have introduced bans for tourists from red zones to stay in hotels. If numbers do not go down within the following 10 days then stricter measures should be applied.
All citizens are invited to use the Corona-Warn-App which is available since 16 June 2020.
General rules extended to AHA+H+L meaning distance+hygiene+mask+App+ventilation

Read more

Full Restrictions

  • Germany Germany is one of the countries that recently changed its testing rules. During the second week of October, the German authorities announced that citizens of the country would no longer be able to benefit from free of charge tests.

    In line with the new rules, since October 11, all German citizens who have not been vaccinated or recovered from the COVID-19 disease will have to cover the price of their test.

    According to the German authorities, citizens of the country have had enough time to get vaccinated. For this reason, they think that it is intolerable that the taxpayers’ money gets used to cover Coronavirus testing costs.

    Such new rules, which mainly affect unvaccinated persons, aim to increase the vaccination rates within the country.

    The price of antigen tests in Germany varies between €12 and €50, whereas PCR tests cost between €45 and €120.

    Read more
    18.10.2021
  • Germany Travellers from Algeria, Fiji, Morocco, Sri Lanka, and Tunisia can now enter Germany under facilitated entry restrictions, as all five third countries have been removed from the list of high-risk areas.

    Updating the list, the Robert Koch Institute, which is the German agency responsible for disease control and prevention, also added to the list Gabon and Sao Tome and Principe, upon an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases in the territory of both countries.

    “The list below for the classification of risk areas is effective from Sunday, October 17, 2021, at 12:00 a.m. The classification of risk areas can change at short notice. Please check immediately before departure whether the countries in which you have stayed in the last ten days before entering Germany are classified as risk areas,” the RKI notes amongst others.

    The move means that starting from Sunday, travellers from Gabon and Sao Tome and will have to register at einreiseanmeldung.de before arriving in Germany.

    They will also have to quarantine for a period of ten days, which can be ended prematurely if the traveller provides proof of vaccination or previous recovery. The quarantine can also be ended earlier if the traveller tests for COVID-19, though not earlier than on the fifth day.

    “The quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than five days after entry,” the German Foreign Office explains.

    On the other hand, travellers from Algeria, Fiji, Morocco, Sri Lanka, and Tunisia are no longer subject to these requirements, in particular travellers vaccinated against COVID-19.

    Read more
    16.10.2021
  • Germany The German authorities have revealed that starting from today, October 8, travellers from two European countries and three third countries will be subject to stricter entry rules since they have been placed in the high-risk areas list.

    According to an announcement published by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), which is the German research body responsible for disease control and prevention, as of today, the following countries will be part of the high-risk:

    Estonia
    Latvia
    Brunei Darussalam
    Ukraine
    Yemen
    Such a decision to move these countries to the high-risk list was taken after they identified over 100 COVID-19 infection cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the last seven days, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    Based on the figures provided by the World Health Organization (WHO), Estonia has reported 949 new infection cases only in the last 24 hours. During the same time frame, Latvia reported 1,752 new cases, Ukraine reported 15,125, Yemen reported 37, and Brunei Darussalam reported 106 new infection cases.

    Accordingly, based on the current rules that Germany has, travellers from one of the countries/regions that are part of the high-risk list are required to register at einreiseanmeldung.de before arriving in Germany and are allowed entry for non-essential purposes as long as they hold proof of full vaccination.

    In addition, the same has noted that those who provide proof of recovery from the virus and those who can present a negative COVID-19 test result can also enter Germany for travel purposes.

    Nonetheless, those arriving from high-risk areas need to follow self-isolation rules until they submit proof of complete vaccination, recovery from the virus, or a negative test result via the entry portal.

    “Vaccinated and recovered persons can end the quarantine from the time when the proof of vaccination or recovery is transmitted via the entry portal. If the transmission takes place before entry (strongly recommended), no quarantine is needed,” the statement of German authorities reads.

    Read more
    10.10.2021
  • Germany The German authorities have revealed that starting from today, October 8, travellers from two European countries and three third countries will be subject to stricter entry rules since they have been placed in the high-risk areas list.

    According to an announcement published by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), which is the German research body responsible for disease control and prevention, as of today, the following countries will be part of the high-risk:

    Estonia
    Latvia
    Brunei Darussalam
    Ukraine
    Yemen
    Such a decision to move these countries to the high-risk list was taken after they identified over 100 COVID-19 infection cases per 100,000 inhabitants during the last seven days, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    Based on the figures provided by the World Health Organization (WHO), Estonia has reported 949 new infection cases only in the last 24 hours. During the same time frame, Latvia reported 1,752 new cases, Ukraine reported 15,125, Yemen reported 37, and Brunei Darussalam reported 106 new infection cases.

    Accordingly, based on the current rules that Germany has, travellers from one of the countries/regions that are part of the high-risk list are required to register at einreiseanmeldung.de before arriving in Germany and are allowed entry for non-essential purposes as long as they hold proof of full vaccination.

    In addition, the same has noted that those who provide proof of recovery from the virus and those who can present a negative COVID-19 test result can also enter Germany for travel purposes.

    Nonetheless, those arriving from high-risk areas need to follow self-isolation rules until they submit proof of complete vaccination, recovery from the virus, or a negative test result via the entry portal.

    “Vaccinated and recovered persons can end the quarantine from the time when the proof of vaccination or recovery is transmitted via the entry portal. If the transmission takes place before entry (strongly recommended), no quarantine is needed,” the statement of German authorities reads.

    On the other hand, through the same update, it has been revealed that Azerbaijan, Colombia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, the French regions of Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin, Saint Barthelemy, French Polynesia, and the Norwegian counties of Oslo and Viken have been removed from the high-risk list.

    This means that travellers from these four countries and six regions are no longer subject to strict entry rules that apply to arrivals to those categorised as high-risk.

    Read more
    08.10.2021
  • Germany Based on the data provided by the German Federal Ministry of Interior, Building and Home Affairs, entry to Germany is permitted to European Union Member States and Schengen-associated countries, including Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein.

    Travellers from the EU and Schengen Area countries placed on the “high incidence areas” list must register online and provide a negative COVID-19 test result carried within 48 hours before arrival in Germany. Additionally, they will be required to stay self-isolated for ten days.

    Travellers from EU and Schengen Area countries placed in the “risk areas” are subject to the same restrictions as those mentioned above.

    Nonetheless, travellers from these areas who provide proof of vaccination against the COVID-19 or proof of recovery are allowed to skip testing and quarantine requirements.

    For those who are required to provide a negative PCR test, the result should not be older than 72 hours. The testing certificate is recognised if available in either German, English, French, Italian, or Spanish.

    For vaccinated persons, the vaccination certificate is recognised in the same languages. The approved vaccine doses by Germany include Comirnaty, Moderna, Vaxzevria, and Janssen, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    In addition, based on the EU Council’s recommendation, travellers from the following third countries and regions are allowed to enter Germany restriction-free:

    Australia
    Canada
    Chile
    Hong Kong
    Kuwait
    Jordan
    Macao
    Moldova
    New Zealand
    Qatar
    Rwanda
    Saudi Arabia
    Singapore
    South Korea
    Taiwan
    Ukraine
    Uruguay
    China (subject to reciprocity)
    “Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they serve in an important role or if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated,” the Ministry’s statement notes.

    Read more
    05.10.2021
  • Germany All vaccinated travellers from Chile, Kuwait, and Rwanda will now be allowed to enter Germany restriction-free since the three territories have been added to the list of epidemiologically safe countries, the Federal Ministry of the Interior, Building, and Community (BMI) has confirmed.

    Based on the entry rules that Germany currently has in place, all persons from one of the three above-mentioned countries who have been fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 disease can enter Germany without having to follow strict entry restrictions, such as testing and self-isolation rules.

    However, in order to be permitted restriction-free entry, each traveller should meet the requirements related to the vaccination status as well as to the vaccine they have been immunised with, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    In line with the Ordinance on Coronavirus Entry Regulations for vaccinated travellers, everyone should provide a vaccination certificate, which indicates that the holder has been immunised against the disease with one of the vaccines that Germany has approved for travel.

    Germany has recognised five vaccines for travel until now, which are as follows:

    BioNTech/Pfizer (Comirnaty)
    Johnson & Johnson (Janssen)
    Moderna (Spikevax)
    AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria)
    Covishield (Serum Institute of India)
    In addition, except for the vaccination certificate, those who prove that they have recovered from the COVID-19 during the last six months are also exempted from the entry rules, meaning that a recovery certificate also exempts travellers from Chile, Kuwait, and Rwanda from measures imposed upon entry.

    Except for the three countries that have been newly added to the list, Germany also allows restriction-free entry to the following third countries:

    Australia
    Hong Kong
    Jordan
    Canada
    Qatar
    Macau
    New Zealand
    Saudi Arabia
    Singapore
    South Korea
    Taiwan
    Ukraine
    Uruguay
    China (subject to reciprocity)
    Uruguay was just recently added to the safe third countries list.

    – Advertisement –
    “Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they serve in an important role or if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated,” the Ministry noted.

    Read more
    28.09.2021
  • Germany The German federal government agency and research institute responsible for disease control and prevention, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), has updated the list of high-risk areas with increased rates of COVID-19 infections, removing Japan, Senegal and the French region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur from the list.

    The decision was announced on Friday, September 24, and becomes effective on Sunday, September 26, and it means that travellers from these two countries and the French region mentioned above are no longer subject to strict entry requirements that apply to arrivals from countries and regions categorized as high-risk.

    Germany had added Japan to the list of high-risk areas earlier this month due to the COVID-19 situation in this country. At the time, Japanese authorities had reported 17,456 new cases of COVID-19 on September 4 alone. However, in the last 24 hours, Japan has reported 3,457 cases, data by World Health Organization shows. The country is home to a population of 126.3 million.

    On the other hand, the RKI, which is subordinate to the Federal Ministry of Health, has added the following countries and regions to the list of high-risk areas due to an increase in the number of COVID-19 infections reported in their territories:

    Burundi
    Ethiopia
    France – the French overseas department New Caledonia
    Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
    Slovenia
    Data by the World Health Organization shows that Slovenia, an EU country of 2.081 million residents, has reported 1,011 new Coronavirus cases in the last 24 hours.

    Travellers from countries categorized under the high-risk list who are eligible to enter Germany, aged 12 and older, are obliged to present their vaccination certificates, or test results, upon entry. They are also obliged to register at einreiseanmeldung.de before arriving in Germany and carry proof of registration with them when reaching the country.

    “In addition, when entering the Federal Republic of Germany after a stay in a foreign high-risk area or virus variant area, special registration, proof and quarantine requirements must be observed,” the RKI notes.

    For now, non-vaccinated travellers can enter Germany for non-essential purposes only from the following third countries: Australia, Chile, Hong Kong, Jordan, Canada, Qatar, Kuwait, Macau, New Zealand, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, and Uruguay.

    Read more
    27.09.2021
  • Germany Starting from Sunday, September 19, travellers from Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Moldova, and Venezuela will face stricter entry restrictions when travelling to Germany, as the same have been placed in the list of high-risk areas.

    According to the Robert Koch Institute, which is the German agency for disease prevention and control, these countries have been added to the high-risk list due to particularly high incidences for the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus in the past days, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    Thus, starting from Sunday, travellers from these countries who are permitted to enter Germany, aside from being obliged to fill out the digital entry form at einreiseanmeldung.de and to carry the confirmation they have received with them upon entry, will also be subject to requirements as vaccination passport, testing and quarantine.

    “Travelers who have previously stayed in a high-risk area must have a test, vaccination or recovery certificate with them and, in the event that a carrier is used, present the proof for the purpose of the transport,” the RKI notes.

    It also explains that travellers who have stayed in a high-risk area should isolate upon arrival for a period of ten days. The period of quarantine, however, can be ended prematurely if proof of recovery, a vaccination certificate or a negative test certificate is submitted via einreiseanmeldung.de.

    For those who provide proof of recovery or vaccination immediately upon arrival, the same won’t have to quarantine. However, those who chose testing against COVID-19 as a way to end quarantine prematurely cannot do so before the fifth day of isolation.

    Read more
    20.09.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities add Israel, Turkey, U.S, Vietnam to its ‘high-risk’ area list and tighten entry restrictions for unvaccinated travelers as COVID-19 cases surge (USA Today, 15.08.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Overview – general information:

    Germany classifies areas as: “high incidence” or “virus variant”, areas. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    All travellers entering Germany have to provide a negative test result or proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery, independent from where they arrive. 

    Children under 12 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    Information on entry rules for Germany is available at: auswaertiges-amt.de

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry. For children under 12 years self-isolation ends automatically after 5 days.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “virus variant areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Proof of transit or a stay of maximum 24 hours is required. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore, these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the selected requirements for entry, regarding testing proof, proof of recovery, or proof of full vaccination, must be folowed.

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    24.08.2021
  • Germany Starting from Sunday, August 22, Brazilians holding a valid German visa will finally be eligible to travel to Germany, including here work and student visa holders, after the authorities no longer consider Brazil a virus variant area but rather a high-risk area.

    The Robert Koch Institute, which is the German federal government agency and research institute responsible for disease control and prevention, has removed both Brazil and Uruguay from the list of virus variant areas, which means that arrivals from these countries are now subject to facilitated entry rules.

    From Sunday on, Brazilian travellers reaching Germany from their home country are required to follow the steps listed below:

    Register online at einreiseanmeldung.de and carry the confirmation with them when entering the country
    Hold proof of negative COVID-19 test results, vaccination or recovery, which should be uploaded at einreiseanmeldung.de during registration
    Quarantine for a period of ten days in Germany if no proof of vaccination, testing or recovery is presented
    “Quarantine can be ended in each case from the time the negative test result has been submitted. If you have spent time in a high-risk area prior to entry, the relevant test may not be conducted earlier than five days after entry,” the German authorities explain.

    Previously, as Brazil was considered a virus variant area, travellers who were permitted to enter Germany from Brazil were obliged to quarantine for two weeks, without the possibility of ending the isolation period prematurely.

    Currently, there are no countries listed under Germany’s category of virus variant areas, after previously on August 1, the rest of the countries in this list were removed from it, which were Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa.

    Updating the list of high-risk areas, the RKI has added several more countries to the list, including some EU countries, as follows:

    Dominica
    Greece – the regions Crete and the South Aegean
    Ireland – the regions Border and West
    Kosovo
    North Macedonia
    For Greece’s regions of Crete and South Aegean, the decision becomes effective from Tuesday, August 24.

    Read more
    23.08.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities declare southern France, French overseas territories COVID-19 high-risk area; Netherlands removed from list (Reuters, 06.08.2021). German government removes South Africa and eight other countries from ‘virus variant’ list from 1 August (Reuters, 30.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Overview – general information:

    Germany classifies areas as: “high incidence” or “virus variant”, areas. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    All travellers entering Germany have to provide a negative test result or proof of full vaccination, or proof of recovery, independent from where they arrive. 

    Children under 12 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    Information on entry rules for Germany is available at: auswaertiges-amt.de

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry. For children under 12 years self-isolation ends automatically after 5 days.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “virus variant areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a high incidence area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Proof of transit or a stay of maximum 24 hours is required. 

    Travellers older than 12 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area must provide a negative test result or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore, these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the selected requirements for entry, regarding testing proof, proof of recovery, or proof of full vaccination, must be folowed.

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Both the vaccinated and unvaccinated must continue to adhere to basic non-pharmaceutical guidelines, such as social distancing, wearing masks in enclosed spaces, and regularly ventilating indoor spaces. Wearing a medical-grade mask remains a legal requirement in retail outlets and on public transport.
    From 23 August proof of vaccination, recovery from infection or a negative test (up to 24hrs old for rapid antigen testing or 48 hrs old for PCR testing) will be required for entry into:
    • Hospitals and social care settings
    • Indoor gastronomy
    • Participating in events and celebrations
    • Barbers, hairdressers, or beauty salons
    • Indoor sport such as fitness studios, swimming baths or sports halls
    • Hotels (test at arrival and twice a week during the stay)
    Children five years old and above are exempt from domestic testing requirements. As school pupils are regularly tested at school, they only need to show their school pupil card to prove their C-19 status. Individual States are able to forgo the above rules under certain circumstances, including where the incidence rate is below 35.
    The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). Other vaccination certification is accepted for domestic purposes in both electronic and analogue form as long as it has:
    • The date of vaccination;
    • Name and batch name of the vaccine;
    • Name of the disease against which vaccination was given;
    • Name of the person vaccinated, their date of birth and the name and address of the person responsible for administering the vaccination, and;
    • Confirmation in writing or in electronic form with a qualified electronic signature or a qualified electronic seal by the person responsible for administering the vaccination.
    Those who have recently recovered from Covid must show a positive PCR test at least 28 days old but no older than six months.
    From 11 October 2021 rapid antigen tests will be no longer be available free of charge. For those who have not been recommended for vaccination, such as pregnant women or children under the age of 18, tests will remain free of charge.
    Additional rules apply in settings that can cause super-spreader events, such as mass gatherings, events in enclosed spaces, parties, bars and clubs. State and local authorities can restrict capacity at such venues. The 16 German States have agreed to restrict mass sporting events to 50% capacity above 5,000 participants and not exceed a total of 25,000 participants.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App.
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.

    Read more
    13.08.2021
  • Germany Please note that the amended coronavirus entry regulation will come into force on August 1, 2021 at midnight:

    From this point in time, due to the increasing worldwide distribution of easily transferable SARS-CoV-2 variants (especially the delta variant), a general obligation to provide evidence applies . That means thatPeople aged 12 and over must have a negative test result, proof of vaccination or proof of recovery upon entry. The general obligation to provide evidence applies regardless of the type of means of transport and regardless of whether a previous stay has taken place in a high-risk or virus variant area. In addition, when entering the Federal Republic of Germany after a stay in a foreign high-risk area (previously high-incidence area) or virus variant area, special registration, verification and quarantine obligations must be observed. When entering from virus variant areas – subject to very narrowly limited exceptions – there is a ban on passenger transport by train, bus, ship and flight directly from these countries.

    From August 1, 2021, risk areas will only be classified in two categories: high-risk areas (previously high-incidence areas) and virus variant areas. The category of “simple” risk areas does not apply . The omission of the category of “simple” risk areas does not mean that there is no longer a relevant increased risk of infection when staying in these areas. There is currently a global risk of infection.

    Due to the dynamic nature of the infection, it may be necessary to identify new virus variant areas and high-risk areas at very short notice

    You can find more information here: https://www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/service/gesetze-und-verordnung/guv-19-lp/coronaeinreisev.html

    The changes below in the classification of risk areas (“new since the last change”) are effective from Sunday, August 1, 2021 at 12:00 am.

    New since the last change:
    1. New virus variant areas – areas with a particularly high risk of infection due to the widespread occurrence of certain SARS-CoV-2 virus variants:

    No new virus variant areas since the last change (see current list below).

    2. New high-incidence areas or high-risk areas – areas with a particularly high risk of infection due to particularly high incidences for the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus:

    Andorra is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously simple risk area).

    Botswana is now a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Eswatini is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Lesotho is now a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Malawi is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Mozambique is now a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Namibia is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Zambia is now a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    Zimbabwe is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    South Africa is now considered a high incidence area or high risk area (previously virus variant area).

    3. Areas that are no longer considered risk areas:

    The Dominican Republic is no longer a risk area.

    The classification as a risk area is based on a joint analysis and decision by the Federal Ministry of Health, the Foreign Office and the Federal Ministry of the Interior, Building and Home Affairs.

    The states / regions listed below are currently designated as areas in which there is an increased risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2. In brackets it is listed since when the area has been considered a risk area.

    People arriving by plane must, regardless of whether they have stayed in a risk area, present the carrier with a negative test result, proof of vaccination or proof of recovery before departure.

    General obligation to provide evidence (NEW from August 1, 2021, 12:00 a.m.) : All travelers who have reached the age of twelve must present a negative test certificate, a vaccination or health certificate upon arrival. Special rules apply to commuters.

    People who have been in one of the risk areas listed below in the last 10 days before entering the Federal Republic of Germany must observe certain rules:

    Obligation to register : Travelers who have previously stayed in a risk area are obliged to fill out the digital entry registration at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de and to carry the received confirmation with them when they enter. The confirmation is checked by the carrier and, if necessary, also by the Federal Police as part of border police duties.
    Special obligation to provide evidence :
    Travelers who have previously stayed in a high-incidence or high-risk area must carry proof of test, vaccination or convalescence with them and, if a carrier is used, present the proof for the purpose of transport. If you have previously stayed in a virus variant area, proof of a test is mandatory.
    When entering after a previous stay in a simple risk area, travelers must have a negative test result, vaccination or health certificate no later than 48 hours after entry (this does not apply from August 1, 2021, 0:00 a.m.) .
    The evidence must be uploaded via the entry portal at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de .
    Quarantine obligation : People who have stayed in a risk area must go home immediately after arrival – or other accommodation at the destination – and isolate themselves for ten days ( home quarantine ). If you previously stayed in a virus variant area, the separation period is fourteen days.
    Ending the quarantine : The home quarantine can be ended prematurely or does not have to be started if proof of recovery, a vaccination certificate or a negative test certificate is transmitted via the entry portal of the Federal Republic at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de . The quarantine can be ended from the time of transmission. After a previous stay in high-incidence areas or high-risk areas , testing can be carried out at the earliest five days after entry . After staying in virus variant areas, the quarantine lasts 14 days and an early termination of the quarantine is generally not possible.
    According to 4 paragraph 2 sentence 5 of the Corona Entry Ordinance by the RKI, there is currently no finding that a specific vaccine would be sufficiently effective against the virus variant that led to the classification of the area as a virus variant area. There is therefore no exception to the quarantine requirement for fully vaccinated persons after previous stay in a virus variant area.
    When entering from so-called virus variant areas, there is a ban on passenger transport by train, bus, ship and flight from these countries.
    Special agreements between the Federal Republic of Germany and local national governments according to Section 6 Paragraph 2 Clause 1 Number 2 Coronavirus Entry Ordinance:

    There are currently no agreements with other countries within the meaning of Section 6 Paragraph 2 Clause 1 Number 2 of the Coronavirus Entry Ordinance.
    You can find more information on the stated obligations, exceptions and requirements for the respective evidence at: https://www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/service/gesetze-und-verordnung/guv-19-lp/coronaeinreisev.html

    Further information on the recognition of diagnostic tests for SARS-CoV-2 when entering Germany from a risk area can be found at:

    https://www.rki.de/DE/Content/InfAZ/N/Neuartiges_Coronavirus/Tests.html

    Please note: The Federal Government is constantly checking the extent to which areas are to be classified as risk areas. Therefore, changes may be made at short notice, in particular this list may be expanded.

    The existing travel and safety information from the Federal Foreign Office ( https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/de/ReiseUndSicherheit/reise-und-sicherheitshinweise ) and the information from the Federal Government for travelers and commuters ( https: //www.bundesregierung. de / breg-de / themes / coronavirus / corona-regulations-1735032 ) remain valid.

    Read more
    02.08.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities to require negative COVID-19 test for all unvaccinated travelers entering the country from 1 August (The Local – Germany, 28.07.2021 ). Unvaccinated travelers to Germany arriving from Spain, Netherlands will have to quarantine for at least five days after countries declared high risk (Reuters, 23.07.2021). Government to increase border checks, require ‘health passport’ for long-distance train, bus travel and introduce other measures to stem increase in COVID-19 cases (Europa.EU, 13.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany classifies areas as: “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children under 6 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    Overview – general information: Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a risk area or area of variants of concern must, as a rule, already carry with them a negative test result on entry. Travellers who spent time in a high-incidence area must also present proof of full vaccination or proof of recovery.

    In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

    From “risk areas”:

    Travellers who enter Germany following a stay in a basic risk area, must be in possession of a negative test result, or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery, within 48 hours of entry. The proof must be uploaded via the travel portal at the digital registration on entry. (www.einreiseanmeldung.de)

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “areas of variant of concern”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Some restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are still in place in Germany, although measures are gradually being relaxed.
    • Private gatherings are restricted, generally up to ten people. The number of different households that can meet varies across the states, as does differentiation between the rules indoors and outdoors. Please follow local guidance. Generally, children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum.
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days.
    • Currently, there are few restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. You may need to show C-19 certification for indoor venues or for outdoor venues if case rates rise significantly.
    • FFP-2 masks are generally compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple surgical masks or mouth-nose coverings.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App
    *Testing positive for COVID-19 in Germany: Anyone testing positive with a Point of Care (PoC) antigen test is required to take a follow-up PCR test immediately and to self-isolate. Close contacts are also required to self-isolate, although exceptions may apply for those who are fully vaccinated.
    In the event of a positive PoC test, the test provider is required to notify the local health office (Gesundheitsamt), which is responsible for monitoring self-isolation and will provide further guidance in individual cases. You can find your local health office by postcode here.
    Individuals testing positive must self-isolate in their home or where they are staying locally, or in another appropriate location enabling self-isolation. They may only leave their home and interrupt self-isolation to carry out the PCR test. Germany does not operate a system of managed quarantine in government facilities.
    Mandatory self-isolation ceases in the event of a negative PCR test. Otherwise self-isolation lasts for 14 days, or until the local health office confirms release.
    *Be prepared for your plans to change: No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.
    If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.
    Plan ahead and make sure you: can access money; understand what your insurance will cover; can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

    Read more
    27.07.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Government to increase border checks, require ‘health passport’ for long-distance train, bus travel and introduce other measures to stem increase in COVID-19 cases (Europa.EU, 13.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany classifies areas as: “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children under 6 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    Overview – general information: Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a risk area or area of variants of concern must, as a rule, already carry with them a negative test result on entry. Travellers who spent time in a high-incidence area must also present proof of full vaccination or proof of recovery.

    In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

    From “risk areas”:

    Travellers who enter Germany following a stay in a basic risk area, must be in possession of a negative test result, or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery, within 48 hours of entry. The proof must be uploaded via the travel portal at the digital registration on entry. (www.einreiseanmeldung.de)

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to the digital registration on entry either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “areas of variant of concern”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Some restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are still in place in Germany, although measures are gradually being relaxed.
    • Private gatherings are restricted, generally up to ten people. The number of different households that can meet varies across the states, as does differentiation between the rules indoors and outdoors. Please follow local guidance. Generally, children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five.
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days.
    • Currently, there are few restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. You may need to show C-19 certification for indoor venues or for outdoor venues if case rates rise significantly.
    • FFP-2 masks are generally compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple surgical masks or mouth-nose coverings.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest
    local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App

    Read more
    19.07.2021
  • Germany Tourists from 25 third countries can travel restriction-free to Germany since July 4, the largest number of countries since March 2020, when Germany closed its borders for all non-essential travellers due to the pandemic.

    Such a decision has been taken in line with the most recent recommendation of the EU Council, which on July 1 modified the list of epidemiologically safe third countries, towards which European Union Members states are encouraged to lift the restrictions gradually.

    According to a press release issued by the German Federal Ministry of Interior, Building and Home Affairs, travellers from the following countries listed below will now eligible to enter Germany for tourism purposes:

    Albania
    Armenia
    Australia
    Azerbaijan
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Brunei
    Canada
    Hong Kong
    Israel
    Japan
    Jordan
    Kosovo
    Lebanon
    Macau
    Moldova
    Montenegro
    New Zealand
    North Macedonia
    Qatar
    Serbia
    Singapore
    South Korea
    Taiwan
    Thailand
    United States

    Read more
    13.07.2021
  • Germany Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany classifies areas as: “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children under 6 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    From “risk areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a risk area or area of variants of concern must, as a rule, already carry with them a negative test result on entry. Travellers who spent time in a high-incidence area may also present proof of full vaccination or proof of recovery. The detailed criteria are: 

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival).

    In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

    Travellers who enter Germany following a stay in a basic risk area, must be in possession of a negative test result, or proof of vaccination, or proof of recovery, within 48 hours of entry. The proof must be uploaded via the travel portal at the digital registration on entry.  

     

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to www.einreiseanmeldung.de either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and without such proof carriage is not possible. 

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

    From “areas of variant of concern”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variants of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible, and a ban on carriage applies to the transport or persons from those countries into Germany by rail, bus, ship, or plane. 

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Some restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are still in place in Germany, although measures are gradually being relaxed.
    • Private gatherings are restricted, generally up to ten people. The number of different households that can meet varies across the states, as does differentiation between the rules indoors and outdoors. Please follow local guidance. Generally, children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five.
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days.
    • Currently, there are few restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. You may need to show C-19 certification for indoor venues or for outdoor venues if case rates rise significantly.
    • FFP-2 masks are generally compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple surgical masks or mouth-nose coverings.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest
    local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App

    Read more
    12.07.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government eases COVID-19 restrictions on travel from India, Nepal, Portugal, Russia, U.K.; 11 other countries remain on ‘virus variant’ list (AP, 05.07.2021). U.S. travelers now can enter Germany, Spain regardless of their vaccination status (SVI, 29.06.2021). German government bans flights from Portugal and Russia from 29 June because of COVID-19 variant, updates list of risk areas (Reuters, 28.06.2021). German authorities to open border to fully vaccinated non-EU nationals from 25 June; entry restrictions still apply to travelers from ‘virus variant’ countries (The Local – Germany, 18.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany classifies areas as: “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children under 6 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    From “risk areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a risk area must self-isolate until they submit to www.einreiseanmeldung.de either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival).

    The proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea). In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

     

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to www.einreiseanmeldung.de either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure. In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    From “areas of variant of concern”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Some restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are still in place in Germany, although measures are gradually being relaxed.
    • Private gatherings are restricted, generally up to ten people. The number of different households that can meet varies across the states, as does differentiation between the rules indoors and outdoors. Please follow local guidance. Generally, children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five.
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by either using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp or two C-19 certification apps (the CovPass-App or the Corona-Warn-App; see below). The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days.
    • Currently, there are few restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. You may need to show C-19 certification for indoor venues or for outdoor venues if case rates rise significantly.
    • FFP-2 masks are generally compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple surgical masks or mouth-nose coverings.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest
    local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including
    Germany’s NINA Warn App

    Read more
    07.07.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government eases COVID-19 restrictions on travel from India, Nepal, Portugal, Russia, U.K.; 11 other countries remain on ‘virus variant’ list (AP, 05.07.2021). U.S. travelers now can enter Germany, Spain regardless of their vaccination status (SVI, 29.06.2021). German government bans flights from Portugal and Russia from 29 June because of COVID-19 variant, updates list of risk areas (Reuters, 28.06.2021). German authorities to open border to fully vaccinated non-EU nationals from 25 June; entry restrictions still apply to travelers from ‘virus variant’ countries (The Local – Germany, 18.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany classifies areas as: “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children under 6 years old are exempted from testing requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    From “risk areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a risk area must self-isolate until they submit to www.einreiseanmeldung.de either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival).

    The proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea). In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

     

    From “high-incidence areas”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in a high-incidence area must self-isolate until they submit to www.einreiseanmeldung.de either:

    • proof of vaccination against COVID-19
      Accepted vaccines: all those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. At least 14 days must have elapsed since the second dose of the vaccine dose (or single dose for Johnson&Johnson);
    • proof of recovery from COVID-19, certified by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days before, and not older than 6 months;
    • a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 48 hours prior to arrival). In this case, the 10-day quarantine period may be ended on the basis of a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    The proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure. In lack of submission of the proof, the mandatory self-isolation period is 10 days.

    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    From “areas of variant of concern”:

    Travellers who – in the last 10 days – have stayed in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (or a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours prior to arrival) and must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

    From areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of one of the countries listed at BMI (bund.de) are allowed to enter Germany also for non-essential purposes like tourism, regardless of their vaccination status. However, proof of vaccination, proof of recovery from COVID-19, or a negative test result is still required for entry via air travel.

    Residents of other non-EU countries are only permitted to enter Germany if they have an urgent need to travel or if they are fully vaccinated. A person is considered a resident of a country if they have their domicile or habitual residence there.

    German citizens, citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members are exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who have a long-term right of residence in an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

    First-time entry by citizens of non-EU countries, however, is only permitted if they demonstrate that one of the exceptions to the entry restrictions applies to them.

    Starting from 25 June 2021, fully vaccinated travellers from third-country (with the exclusion of those arriving from “virus variant areas“) are eligible to enter Germany, even for non-essential purposes like tourism, if 14 days have elapsed since the second dose of a Coronavirus vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency (or single dose for Janssen/Johnson&Johnson). The vaccines approved by EMA are Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, and Janssen.

    Travellers reaching the country by plane will have to prove their vaccinated status.

    The proof of vaccination should be an “EU Digital COVID certificate” or a comparable certificate issued by the travellers’ country of residence, either in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision of whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health (in German)

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    05.07.2021
  • Germany 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. 1.1. This does not apply to: – nationals and residents of Germany; – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus,
    Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,
    Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland; 1.2. This does not apply to the following passengers if arriving from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini
    (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe: – nationals of Andorra, Monaco,
    San Marino, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and EEA Member States; – immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of
    their family relationship; – immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship; – passengers with a residence permit issued by
    Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) or an EEA Member State; – British nationals with a residence permit issued by Germany before 31 December 2020; –
    passengers with a long term “D” visa issued by an EEA Member State or Switzerland; – residents of Albania, Australia, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong (SAR China), Israel, Japan, Korea
    (Rep.), Lebanon, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, North Macedonia (Rep.), Serbia , Singapore, Thailand and USA. They must have been living in the residence country in the past 6
    months; – military personnel; – merchant seamen; – students; – unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a copy of the identity document
    of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that
    they were fully vaccinated with AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure. The certificate must be in in English, French,
    German, Italian or Spanish. They must not be arriving from China (People’s Rep.); – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they received the first vaccine
    dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the
    first vaccine dose. The certificates must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must not be arriving from China (People’s Rep.); – passengers younger than 12
    years accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated with AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech
    at least 14 days before departure. The certificate must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must not be arriving from China (People’s Rep.); – passengers
    younger than 12 years accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen,
    Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure. The parent must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose. The
    certificates must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must not be arriving from China (People’s Rep.).

    2. Passengers arriving from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom,
    Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to transit through Germany to Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia,
    Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland. – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Germany.

    3. Nationals and residents of Germany entering or transiting through Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal,
    Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a
    negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to:
    – passengers younger than 6 years; – passengers transiting through Germany to a non-Schengen Member State.

    4. Passengers entering or transiting through Germany from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal,
    Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a
    negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to:
    – passengers younger than 6 years; – passengers transiting through Germany from a non-Schengen Member State to a non-Schengen Member State; – passengers with a positive COVID-19
    PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland),
    India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination
    certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South
    Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French,
    German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the
    past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom,
    Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days
    before departure, and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first
    vaccine dose.

    5. Airline crew entering Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United
    Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at
    most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish.

    6. Airline crew entering Germany from Argentina, Bahrain, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Egypt, Iran, Kuwait, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Oman, Paraguay, Peru,
    Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago or Tunisia must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a
    negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to:
    – airline crew who are staying in Germany for less than 72 hours; – airline crew with a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6
    months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian
    Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana,
    Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate
    must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca
    (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini
    (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that
    they received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German,
    Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    7. Passengers arriving from a risk area must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    8. Airline crew arriving from a high-incidence area or an area of variant of concern must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    9. Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 or 14 days. Details can be found at
    www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/coronavirus-infos-reisende/faq-tests-entering-germany.html – This does not apply to passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they
    in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Portugal, Russian Fed., South Africa, United
    Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian
    or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

    10. More COVID-19 related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html .

    Read more
    30.06.2021
  • Germany 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. 1.1. This does not apply to: – nationals and residents of Germany; – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus,
    Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,
    Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland; 1.2. This does not apply to the following passengers if arriving from a country other than Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe: – nationals of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino,
    Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) and EEA Member States; – immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family
    relationship; – immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship; – passengers with a residence permit issued by Andorra,
    Monaco, San Marino, Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) or an EEA Member State; – British nationals with a residence permit issued by Germany before 31 December 2020; – passengers
    with a long term “D” visa issued by an EEA Member State or Switzerland; – residents of Albania, Australia, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong (SAR China), Israel, Japan, Korea (Rep.),
    Lebanon, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, North Macedonia (Rep.), Serbia , Singapore, Thailand and USA. They must have been living in the residence country in the past 6 months; –
    military personnel; – merchant seamen; – students; – unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a copy of the identity document of the
    resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

    2. Passengers arriving from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe
    are not allowed to transit through Germany to Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania,
    Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland. – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Germany.

    3. Nationals and residents of Germany entering or transiting through Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South
    Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or
    TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years;
    – passengers transiting through Germany to a non-Schengen Member State.

    4. Passengers entering or transiting through Germany from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South
    Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or
    TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years;
    – passengers transiting through Germany from a non-Schengen Member State to a non-Schengen Member State; – passengers with a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result
    issued at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi,
    Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not
    been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must
    show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria),
    Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland),
    India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they received the first vaccine dose
    of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must also
    have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    5. Airline crew entering Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or
    Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before
    arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish.

    6. Airline crew entering Germany from Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Bahrain, Bolivia, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Colombia, Costa
    Rica, Croatia, Curacao, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, France, Hungary, Iran, Jordan, Kosovo (Rep.), Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia,
    North Macedonia (Rep.), Oman, Palestinian Territory, Paraguay, Poland, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, St. Maarten, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Tunisia or Ukraine
    must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The
    test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – airline crew who are staying in Germany for less than 72 hours; – airline crew with
    a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination
    certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom,
    Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or
    Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days
    have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The
    certificate must show that they received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in
    English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    7. Passengers arriving from a risk area must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    8. Airline crew arriving from a high-incidence area or an area of variant of concern must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    9. Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 or 14 days. Details can be found at
    www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/coronavirus-infos-reisende/faq-tests-entering-germany.html – This does not apply to passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they
    in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or
    Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines
    accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

    10. More COVID-19 related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html .

    Read more
    22.06.2021
  • Germany . Passengers are not allowed to enter. 1.1. This does not apply to: – nationals and residents of Germany; – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus,
    Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,
    Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland; 1.2. This does not apply to the following passengers if arriving from a country other than Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe: – nationals of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Switzerland,
    Vatican City (Holy See) and EEA Member States; – immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family relationship; –
    immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship; – passengers with a residence permit issued by Andorra, Monaco, San Marino,
    Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) or an EEA Member State; – British nationals with a residence permit issued by Germany before 31 December 2020; – passengers with a long term
    “D” visa issued by an EEA Member State or Switzerland; – residents of Australia, Israel, Japan, Korea (Rep.), New Zealand, Singapore and Thailand. They must have been living in the
    residence country in the past 6 months; – military personnel; – merchant seamen; – students; – unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a
    copy of the identity document of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

    2. Passengers arriving from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not
    allowed to transit through Germany to Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg,
    Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland. – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Germany.

    3. Nationals and residents of Germany entering or transiting through Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa,
    United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test
    taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years; –
    passengers transiting through Germany to a non-Schengen Member State.

    4. Passengers entering or transiting through Germany from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa,
    United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test
    taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years; –
    passengers transiting through Germany from a non-Schengen Member State to a non-Schengen Member State; – passengers with a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued
    at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique,
    Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana,
    Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully
    vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and
    Pfizer-BioNTech; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi,
    Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria),
    Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery
    certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    5. Airline crew entering Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe
    must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The
    test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish.

    6. Airline crew entering Germany from Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Bahrain, Bolivia, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Colombia, Costa
    Rica, Croatia, Curacao, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, France, Hungary, Iran, Jordan, Kosovo (Rep.), Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia,
    North Macedonia (Rep.), Oman, Palestinian Territory, Paraguay, Poland, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, St. Maarten, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Tunisia or Ukraine
    must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The
    test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – airline crew who are staying in Germany for less than 72 hours; – airline crew with
    a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate
    if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or
    Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines
    accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in
    Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they
    received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German,
    Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    7. Passengers arriving from a risk area must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    8. Airline crew arriving from a high-incidence area or an area of variant of concern must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    9. Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 or 14 days. Details can be found at
    www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/coronavirus-infos-reisende/faq-tests-entering-germany.html – This does not apply to passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they
    in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe.
    The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are
    AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

    10. More COVID-19 related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html .

    Read more
    18.06.2021
  • Germany 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. 1.1. This does not apply to: – nationals and residents of Germany; – passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus,
    Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland,
    Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland; 1.2. This does not apply to the following passengers if arriving from a country other than Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe: – nationals of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, Switzerland,
    Vatican City (Holy See) and EEA Member States; – immediate family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. They must present proof of their family relationship; –
    immediate family members of residents of Germany. They must present proof of their family relationship; – passengers with a residence permit issued by Andorra, Monaco, San Marino,
    Switzerland, Vatican City (Holy See) or an EEA Member State; – British nationals with a residence permit issued by Germany before 31 December 2020; – passengers with a long term
    “D” visa issued by an EEA Member State or Switzerland; – residents of Australia, Israel, Japan, Korea (Rep.), New Zealand, Singapore and Thailand. They must have been living in the
    residence country in the past 6 months; – military personnel; – merchant seamen; – students; – unmarried partners of residents of Germany. They must have a written invitation and a
    copy of the identity document of the resident in Germany. They must also have a declaration and be able to present proof of their relationship.

    2. Passengers arriving from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not
    allowed to transit through Germany to Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg,
    Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland. – This does not apply to nationals and residents of Germany.

    3. Nationals and residents of Germany entering or transiting through Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa,
    United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test
    taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years; –
    passengers transiting through Germany to a non-Schengen Member State.

    4. Passengers entering or transiting through Germany from a country other than Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa,
    United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test
    taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – passengers younger than 6 years; –
    passengers transiting through Germany to a non-Schengen Member State; – passengers with a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6
    months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United
    Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland),
    India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days
    before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – passengers
    with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South
    Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or
    Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at
    least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    5. Airline crew entering Germany from Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe
    must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 24 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The
    test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish.

    6. Airline crew entering Germany from Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Bahrain, Bolivia, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cape Verde, Colombia, Costa
    Rica, Croatia, Curacao, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, France, Hungary, Iran, Jordan, Kosovo (Rep.), Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mongolia, Montenegro, Namibia,
    North Macedonia (Rep.), Oman, Palestinian Territory, Paraguay, Poland, Serbia, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, St. Maarten, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Tunisia or Ukraine
    must have: – a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 48 hours before arrival; or – a negative COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The
    test result must be in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. – This does not apply to: – airline crew who are staying in Germany for less than 72 hours; – airline crew with
    a positive COVID-19 PCR, RT-LAMP or TMA test result issued at least 28 days and at most 6 months before arrival. They must in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil,
    Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate
    if they in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or
    Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines
    accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech; – airline crew with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they in the past 10 days have not been in
    Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe. The certificate must show that they
    received the first vaccine dose of AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech at least 14 days before departure, and must be in in English, French, German,
    Italian or Spanish. They must also have a COVID-19 recovery certificate issued at least 6 months before the first vaccine dose.

    7. Passengers arriving from a risk area must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    8. Airline crew arriving from a high-incidence area or an area of variant of concern must register before departure at https://www.einreiseanmeldung.de

    9. Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 or 14 days. Details can be found at
    www.bundesgesundheitsministerium.de/coronavirus-infos-reisende/faq-tests-entering-germany.html – This does not apply to passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate if they
    in the past 10 days have not been in Botswana, Brazil, Eswatini (Swaziland), India, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, South Africa, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Zambia or Zimbabwe.
    The certificate must show that they were fully vaccinated at least 14 days before departure and must be in in English, French, German, Italian or Spanish. Vaccines accepted are
    AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Janssen, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech.

    10. More COVID-19 related information can be found at www.bundespolizei.de/Web/DE/04Aktuelles/01Meldungen/2020/03/200317_faq.html .

    Read more
    16.06.2021
  • Germany The German Federal Ministry of Interior, Building, and Home Affairs has announced that persons who are to participate in the European Football Championship are now exempted from the quarantine requirement, even if they are entering from a virus variant area.

    Later this week, the cabinet is expected to decide on other adjustments regarding the entry regulations imposed due to the COVID-19, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “The European Football Championship is a major sporting event that the whole world is watching and for whose success Germany will do its part. We have had good experiences with the hygiene measures in the Bundesliga, made in the DFB Cup and in the Champions League, incidentally also in other disciplines. We are sending our Olympians to Tokyo,” the statement of the Ministry reads.

    In addition, the Federal Minister of Interior, Horst Seehofer, said that Germany will support the event as the European Football Championship is one of the major sports tournaments watched all over the world.

    The exemption will apply to all participants who have been authorised by the organising committee and will remain effective until July 28, 2021. Still, everyone is required to respect hygiene measures and will be subject to daily testing.

    Currently, Germany allows entry only to travellers from the European Union Member States and Schengen Area countries, including Iceland, Norway, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein.

    In addition, in line with the EU Recommendation, arrivals from Australia, Japan, Israel, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand are also permitted entry to Germany.

    Arrivals from EU/Schengen Area countries that are placed on the high incidence areas or risk areas list are required to register online and submit a negative test result carried within 48 hours.

    However, the authorities have revealed that travellers who have been vaccinated against the COVID-19 or have recovered from the virus can skip testing and quarantine requirements.

    Read more
    10.06.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German authorities bans U.K. travelers from entering country because of COVID-19 variants; other restrictions reported (SVI, 24.05.2021). More COVID-19 restrictions lifted; Chancellor Merkel urges caution (AP, 21.05.2021). German government reportedly bans flights from Nepal (Khabarhub, 17.05.2021). Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted from COVID-19 test requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 can be provided in digital or paper form. The vaccine must be one of those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose.

    Proof of recovery from COVID-19 is provided by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 6 months before.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    Travel from “areas of variant of concern”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival).

     

    Travel from “high-incidence areas”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in a high incidence area are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19.
    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    Travel from other risk areas (without prior stays in “high-incidence areas” or “areas of variant of concern”)

    Travellers from risk areas are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. This proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine applies to travellers until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the portal www.einreiseanmeldung.de.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area, high incidence area or area of variant of concern in the last 10 days must self-isolate for 10 days (14 days in case of area of variant of concern).

    For arrivals from high incidence areas, the quarantine period may be ended with a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    For arrivals from areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    Current classification of countries
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    25.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: More COVID-19 restrictions lifted; Chancellor Merkel urges caution (AP, 21.05.2021). German government reportedly bans flights from Nepal (Khabarhub, 17.05.2021). Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted from COVID-19 test requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 can be provided in digital or paper form. The vaccine must be one of those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose.

    Proof of recovery from COVID-19 is provided by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 6 months before.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    Travel from “areas of variant of concern”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival).

     

    Travel from “high-incidence areas”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in a high incidence area are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19.
    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    Travel from other risk areas (without prior stays in “high-incidence areas” or “areas of variant of concern”)

    Travellers from risk areas are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. This proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine applies to travellers until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the portal www.einreiseanmeldung.de.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area, high incidence area or area of variant of concern in the last 10 days must self-isolate for 10 days (14 days in case of area of variant of concern).

    For arrivals from high incidence areas, the quarantine period may be ended with a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    For arrivals from areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    Current classification of countries
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    22.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government reportedly bans flights from Nepal (Khabarhub, 17.05.2021). Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted from COVID-19 test requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 can be provided in digital or paper form. The vaccine must be one of those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose.

    Proof of recovery from COVID-19 is provided by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 6 months before.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    Travel from “areas of variant of concern”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival).

     

    Travel from “high-incidence areas”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in a high incidence area are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19.
    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    Travel from other risk areas (without prior stays in “high-incidence areas” or “areas of variant of concern”)

    Travellers from risk areas are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival (for antigen rapid test: within 24 hours prior to arrival) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. This proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine applies to travellers until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the portal www.einreiseanmeldung.de.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area, high incidence area or area of variant of concern in the last 10 days must self-isolate for 10 days (14 days in case of area of variant of concern).

    For arrivals from high incidence areas, the quarantine period may be ended with a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    For arrivals from areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    Current classification of countries
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

    Travellers older than 6 years in transit, coming from a virus variant area, are required to present a negative COVID-19 test upon entry. Transit travellers from a high incidence area or any other area are not subject to the COVID-19 test requirement.

    Transit by air

    Changing flights without leaving the international transit area of an airport does not constitute an entry into Germany for the purposes of the relevant regulation. In these cases the digital entry registration, requirements for mandatory testing or providing proof of vaccination, quarantine regulations and travel bans from countries affected by coronavirus variants do not apply. This only affects travels from a destination outside the Schengen area and with a destination outside Schengen area – for example from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Buenos Aires (outside Schengen).

    When travelling from or to the Schengen area you will need to leave the international transit area of an airport – for example when travelling from Moscow (outside Schengen) via Frankfurt (transit) to Madrid (Schengen area) or the other way. Therefore these travels do constitute an entry to Germany and the requirements detailed below must be observed.

    Travellers aged 6 years or older must hold proof of the following:

    • Following a stay in an area of variant of concern in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a high incidence area in the last 10 days: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • For arrivals by air without prior stays in high incidence areas or areas of variant of concern: a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival, proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or proof of recovery from an infection. This proof must be held prior to entering the country, and must be presented to the airline before departure;
    • Following a stay in a risk area (not an area of variant of concern or a high incidence area): a negative COVID-19 test result taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or proof of vaccination or recovery from an infection. This proof must be presented no later than 48 hours after entry.
    • A digital entry registration

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

     

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    21.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government reportedly bans flights from Nepal (Khabarhub, 17.05.2021). Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted from COVID-19 test requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 can be provided in digital or paper form. The vaccine must be one of those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose.

    Proof of recovery from COVID-19 is provided by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 6 months before.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    Travel from “areas of variant of concern”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 24 hours before entry).

     

    Travel from “high-incidence areas”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in a high incidence area are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 48 hours before entry) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19.
    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    Travel from other risk areas (without prior stays in “high-incidence areas” or “areas of variant of concern”)

    Travellers from risk areas are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 48 hours before entry) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. This proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine applies to travellers until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the portal www.einreiseanmeldung.de.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area, high incidence area or area of variant of concern in the last 10 days must self-isolate for 10 days (14 days in case of area of variant of concern).

    For arrivals from high incidence areas, the quarantine period may be ended with a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    For arrivals from areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    Current classification of countries
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit by land or sea

    Transit travellers who are entering Germany and then immediately traveling onward to another country do not have to register their entry online.

    In the case of border traffic, persons who have spent less than 24 hours in a risk area or are only entering Germany for a period of up to 24 hours, are exempted from the quarantine requirement.

     

    Transit by air

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted.

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    Find out more:
    Coronavirus and entry restrictions
    information (in German)

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    19.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government reportedly bans flights from Nepal (Khabarhub, 17.05.2021). Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as “virus variant”, “high incidence”, or “risk” area. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted from COVID-19 test requirements. Details on the recognition of tests are provided by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Proof of vaccination against COVID-19 can be provided in digital or paper form. The vaccine must be one of those listed on the website of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut. A period of at least 14 days must have elapsed since receiving the last vaccine dose.

    Proof of recovery from COVID-19 is provided by a positive PCR test result carried out at least 28 days but no more than 6 months before.

    Documentation must be provided in German, English, French, Italian or Spanish.

     

    Travel from “areas of variant of concern”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in an area of variant of concern are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 24 hours before entry).

     

    Travel from “high-incidence areas”

    Travellers who have stayed in the last 10 days in a high incidence area are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 48 hours before entry) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19.
    Exemptions apply, in particular to persons who have passed through a high incidence area without a stopover, or those passing through Germany via the fastest route available.

     

    Travel from other risk areas (without prior stays in “high-incidence areas” or “areas of variant of concern”)

    Travellers from risk areas are subject to a pre-departure negative PCR test taken no earlier than 72 hours before entry (for antigen rapid test: no earlier than 48 hours before entry) or, alternatively, to submission of proof of a full COVID-19 vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. This proof must be presented to the airline before departure (for arrivals by air) or no later than 48 hours after entry (for arrivals by land or sea).

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A quarantine applies to travellers until proof of full vaccination, recovery from an infection or a negative test result is submitted via the portal www.einreiseanmeldung.de.

    Travellers who have stayed in a risk area, high incidence area or area of variant of concern in the last 10 days must self-isolate for 10 days (14 days in case of area of variant of concern).

    For arrivals from high incidence areas, the quarantine period may be ended with a negative test carried out no earlier than 5 days after entry.

    For arrivals from areas of variant of concern, a reduction of the quarantine period is not possible.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    Current classification of countries
    Federal Foreign Office
    Ministry of Health

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    18.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany, though gradually being reduced:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates. Looser restrictions are in place where the incidence rate is below 35 in some states
    • The fully vaccinated and those who have recovered are exempt from the above restrictions on contact, as well as limits on contactless sport (these vary in the states). The fully vaccinated can demonstrate their status by using yellow vaccination booklets ‘Impfpass’ which contain a doctor’s signature and stamp. The recovered must show a positive PCR test no older than six months and no younger than 28 days. Germany is working on a C-19 certification app.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, with employees required to justify why they cannot work from home.
    • Depending on local incidence rates, there are restrictions on non-essential retail, gastronomy, barbers and hairdressers, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities. These establishments might be closed completely, or you might need to register for an appointment in advance, or show C-19 certification, such as a test or vaccination status.
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. This may be an FFP-2 mask, rather than a simple surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English including Germany’s NINA Warn App.

    Read more
    15.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Germany eases entry restrictions for travelers who have been fully vaccinated or have recovered from COVID-19 to enter the country without quarantine (Xinhua, 13.05.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    14.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government bans some flights, travelers from India because of rising cases of COVID-19 (Times of India, 26.04.2021). German government classifies Cape Verde, India, Oman, Qatar and Tunisia as new COVID-19 ‘high incidence areas’; Albania and Moldova downgraded (Media Reports, 26.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    12.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government bans some flights, travelers from India because of rising cases of COVID-19 (Times of India, 26.04.2021). German government classifies Cape Verde, India, Oman, Qatar and Tunisia as new COVID-19 ‘high incidence areas’; Albania and Moldova downgraded (Media Reports, 26.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers aged 6 years and older entering Germany on flights from high-risk, high-variant and non-risk areas must present a negative Covid-19 test upon departure, taken no more than 48 hours before arrival in Germany.

    The testing obligations also apply to passengers with a connecting flight in Frankfurt or Munich. There are no exceptions to the testing obligation for transit passengers – even if they do not leave the transit area in Frankfurt or Munich.

    There are no exceptions for people who have already been vaccinated.

     

    Additionally, the following provisions apply to third-country nationals:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    11.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government bans some flights, travelers from India because of rising cases of COVID-19 (Times of India, 26.04.2021). German government classifies Cape Verde, India, Oman, Qatar and Tunisia as new COVID-19 ‘high incidence areas’; Albania and Moldova downgraded (Media Reports, 26.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government bans some flights, travelers from India because of rising cases of COVID-19 (Times of India, 26.04.2021). German government classifies Cape Verde, India, Oman, Qatar and Tunisia as new COVID-19 ‘high incidence areas’; Albania and Moldova downgraded (Media Reports, 26.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: German government bans some flights, travelers from India because of rising cases of COVID-19 (Times of India, 26.04.2021). German government classifies Cape Verde, India, Oman, Qatar and Tunisia as new COVID-19 ‘high incidence areas’; Albania and Moldova downgraded (Media Reports, 26.04.2021). Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    27.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    26.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    23.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    22.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021). Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing travel restrictions on the basis of the information underpinning the EU “traffic lights” approach, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    08.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Travelers from Netherlands will need to show negative COVID-19 test and quarantine on arrival in Germany from 6 April (The Local, 04.04.2021). Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021). Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    As of 00:00 on Tuesday, 30 March, all travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    06.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Government announces all persons entering country by plane must submit a negative COVID-19 (PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen) test result prior to boarding (SchengenInfo, 01.04.2021). Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    As of 00:00 on Tuesday, 30 March, all travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    02.04.2021
  • Germany The German Federal Ministry of Health has announced that all persons entering the country by plane are now obliged to submit a negative COVID-19 test result prior to boarding.

    Regardless of which risk area they are travelling from, every individual has to undergo the same measures. However, the swab on which the Coronavirus test is based should not be older than 48 hours, the Federal Ministry of Health explains in a Q&A published on its official website.

    The new regulations will be effective from March 30 until May 12, 2021, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    The requirements will apply to air travellers only. However, other forms of transport will be affected as well for travellers entering from high-risk areas. Moreover, crews, crew members, and children under the age of six are exempted from the new rules.

    The Ministry informed that the testing of the travellers must be performed at the approved laboratories abroad. The test results should be available before departure so that the traveller can submit them to the carrier, and the costs should be covered by the passengers themselves.

    Furthermore, the Ministry asserted that no one is forced to undergo a Coronavirus test. However, the airline companies are allowed only to carry passengers that present a negative test result.

    Commenting on the test recognition, the Ministry announced that methods of nucleic acid amplification technology (PCR, LAMP, TMA) and antigen test are recognised. In contrast, antibody tests are not recognised.

    Rapid antigen tests are recognised if they fulfil the minimum requirements recommended by the WHO, which, compared to PCR tests, should achieve ≥80 per cent sensitivity and ≥97 per cent specificity.

    The tests must be monitored by an authorised third party, which has to confirm the identity of the person tested through an official ID photo. The test result should include the type of the test and the date when it was conducted, and it should be submitted in physical or electronic form in any of the following languages German, English, or French.

    In order for the health authorities to be able to compare the criteria, information on the antigen test and the manufacturer should be provided.

    “Transport by the transport company is only permitted with a negative test certificate. Insulation according to local regulations is to be carried out at your own risk,” the Ministry’s press release reads regarding the German citizens that happen to be abroad when tested positive.

    The test verification procedure will be carried out from the air carriers. Additionally, the Health Department and the Federal Police may require the test certificate submission.

    The Ministry also explained that persons that do not submit a test certificate during the inspection process would be refrained from entering the country. The same applies to people that offer invalid data. The violation of these obligations is subjected to a fine.

    Read more
    01.04.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    As of 00:00 on Tuesday, 30 March, all travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Tthird-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’. The website of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) shows which country falls into which category.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    As of 00:00 on Tuesday, 30 March, all travellers by air are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, TMA, LAMP, rapid antigen. Antibody tests are not accepted.

    Children aged 5 and under are exempted.

    • The test result has to be available as a printout or in electronic form;
    • The certificate needs to be personalised (including name, address, date of birth of the person tested);
    • It has to be available in the German, English or French language;
    • The proof must include the test method and the test result;
    • The test result needs to be validated by a physician or a recognised laboratory.

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must complete a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation. For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a registration on paper.

     

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Germany issues warning for unnecessary travel to France, Austria, Denmark and Czechia due to rising COVID-19 rates (Reuters, 26.03.2021). Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective 28 March (Garda World, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are introduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test should be carried no earlier than 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no earlier than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from a virus variant area. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

    From 28 March, it has been announced that all travellers wishing to enter Germany by plane will be subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, you can get tested for SARS-CoV-2 whereby the quarantine obligation will end following a negative test result.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Other

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities to require all travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival effective March 28 (Garda World, 26.03.2021). German authorities list France as ‘high-risk’ COVID-19 zone, will increase testing requirements at borders (The Local, 26.03.2021). Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021). Authorities extend suspension of passenger transport with areas experiencing COVID-19 variant activity (Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries) until at least March 31 (Garda, 18.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Risk areas are defined as ‘virus variant area’, ‘high incidence area’, or ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute.

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are introduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents.

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof of a negative test result or corresponding medical certificate, upon entry. The test should be carried no earlier than 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no earlier than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from a virus variant area. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

    From 28 March, it has been announced that all travellers wishing to enter Germany by plane will be subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine upon arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, you can get tested for SARS-CoV-2 whereby the quarantine obligation will end following a negative test result.

    Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations and possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are available at the following website.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, go into quarantine. If in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Other

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021). German government plans tighter COVID-19 rules (BBC, 22.03.2021). Authorities extend suspension of passenger transport with areas experiencing COVID-19 variant activity (Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries) until at least March 31 (Garda, 18.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries. Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as a ‘virus variant area’, a ‘high incidence area’, or a ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute. Entry restrictions differ per type of area. The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas, are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof (negative test result or corresponding medical certificate), upon entry, confirming the absence of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, and to present it to the competent authority. This test must have been carried out at the earliest 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no more than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from an area of variant of concern. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine after arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, those entering the country can be tested for SARS-CoV-2 to end the quarantine obligation with a negative test result. Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations that apply to you and any possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are linked at the following website.

     

    Other

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are reintroduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents. 

     

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, to go into quarantine. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    COVID-19 restrictions: Restrictions on social contact aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19 are in place in Germany:
    • Private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. Tighter restrictions are in place in areas of high infection rates.
    • Employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Restrictions on retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and other cultural and leisure activities are in force.
    • Services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned.
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    • Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance.
    These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, restrictions may be tighter or be re-imposed with limited notice.
    As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance
    (in German). There are a variety of sources in English. These measures will next be reviewed on 18 April.

    Read more
    25.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Government confirms extension of lockdown measures until 18 April, plans shutdown of public life 1-3 April (AP, 23.03.2021). German government plans tighter COVID-19 rules (BBC, 22.03.2021). Authorities extend suspension of passenger transport with areas experiencing COVID-19 variant activity (Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries) until at least March 31 (Garda, 18.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as a ‘virus variant area’, a ‘high incidence area’, or a ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute. Entry restrictions differ per type of area. 

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas, are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof (negative test result or corresponding medical certificate), upon entry, confirming the absence of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, and to present it to the competent authority. This test must have been carried out at the earliest 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no more than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from an area of variant of concern. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine after arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, those entering the country can be tested for SARS-CoV-2 to end the quarantine obligation with a negative test result. Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations that apply to you and any possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are linked at the following website.

     

    Other

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are reintroduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents. 

     

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, to go into quarantine. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Germany is gradually easing restrictions on social contact, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • From 8 March, private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. In regions where the incidence rate is below 35, that can be extended to three households with a maximum of 10 people – under 14 year olds not included
    • employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Depending on state and regional incidence rates, retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and a range of other cultural and leisure activities will be able to open in the coming weeks and months
    • services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance. These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, current restrictions may be maintained or re-imposed with limited notice. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.
    These measures will next be reviewed on 22 March.

    Read more
    23.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Authorities extend suspension of passenger transport with areas experiencing COVID-19 variant activity (Brazil, the UK, Ireland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Tyrol in Austria, Moselle in France, and several southern African countries) until at least March 31 (Garda, 18.03.2021). Some COVID-19 restrictions lifted as country continues five-part plan for relaxing the lockdown (DW, 08.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as a ‘virus variant area’, a ‘high incidence area’, or a ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute. Entry restrictions differ per type of area. 

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas, are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof (negative test result or corresponding medical certificate), upon entry, confirming the absence of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, and to present it to the competent authority. This test must have been carried out at the earliest 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no more than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from an area of variant of concern. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine after arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, those entering the country can be tested for SARS-CoV-2 to end the quarantine obligation with a negative test result. Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations that apply to you and any possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are linked at the following website.

     

    Other

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are reintroduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents. 

     

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, to go into quarantine. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Germany is gradually easing restrictions on social contact, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • From 8 March, private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. In regions where the incidence rate is below 35, that can be extended to three households with a maximum of 10 people – under 14 year olds not included
    • employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Depending on state and regional incidence rates, retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and a range of other cultural and leisure activities will be able to open in the coming weeks and months
    • services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance. These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, current restrictions may be maintained or re-imposed with limited notice. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.
    These measures will next be reviewed on 22 March.

    Read more
    19.03.2021
  • Germany Latest News: Some COVID-19 restrictions lifted as country continues five-part plan for relaxing the lockdown (DW, 08.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Germany is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions, which applies to EU and EEA countries.

    Entry from EU Member States and Schengen Associated countries is allowed without restrictions unless a country or region is defined as a ‘virus variant area’, a ‘high incidence area’, or a ‘risk area’ by the Robert Koch Institute. Entry restrictions differ per type of area. 

    The entry rule is based on the country from which the traveller is coming from, and not on nationality.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers from ‘new variant areas’ and ‘high incidence’ areas, are subject to stricter rules. Anyone who has been in one of these areas in the 10 days before entry is obliged to provide proof (negative test result or corresponding medical certificate), upon entry, confirming the absence of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, and to present it to the competent authority. This test must have been carried out at the earliest 48 hours before entry. If travelling by a carrier, proof must also be presented to the carrier before departure. Proof may also be required during checks by the Federal Police. If the traveller can’t obtain proof in the ‘new variant area’ or ‘high incidence area’ of origin, carriers may perform or arrange for pre-departure testing and, in the case of a negative test, provide transportation. This testing (nasopharyngeal swab) by the carrier must take place no more than 12 hours before departure in the case of entry from an area of variant of concern. The proof of a negative test result, or corresponding medical certificate, must be provided on paper or in an electronic document, in German, English or French. The test performed must meet the requirements stated at https://www.rki.de/tests.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers who have stayed in a ‘risk area’ within 10 days before entry must undergo a 10-day quarantine after arrival in Germany.

    After 5 days of quarantine at the earliest, those entering the country can be tested for SARS-CoV-2 to end the quarantine obligation with a negative test result. Certain groups of people are exempt from the quarantine obligation.

    For more information on quarantine regulations that apply to you and any possible exemptions, please contact the respective federal state. Regulations of the respective federal states are linked at the following website.

     

    Other

    Starting 14 February, entry restrictions and internal border controls with Czechia and the Tyrol region in Austria are reintroduced to prevent the spread of virus mutations. Only some exceptions are allowed to enter Germany from these countries, including returning German nationals or residents. 

     

    Specific rules for Unmarried partners from third countries are available.

     

    Mandatory travel documentation

    Travellers entering the Federal Republic of Germany, who have been in a risk area at any time within the last 10 days before entry, are obliged to digitally register, conduct a test for the coronavirus and, depending on the regulations of the federal state, to go into quarantine. If, in exceptional cases, it is not possible to complete a digital entry registration, travellers must instead fill out a substitute registration on paper.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for Germany, the following rules apply:

    Third-country nationals may enter Germany to travel to another EU member state, another Schengen member state or the United Kingdom as their country of final destination if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country (in accordance with Annex I or II of the Council Recommendation of 30 June 2020 or with individual confirmation of permission to enter issued by the country of destination).

    Under these conditions, third-country nationals may also enter Germany by air and travel overland to their country of destination.

    The third-country national must provide evidence that the conditions listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). A printout of the current national regulations in place in the country of destination implementing Annex I of the Council Recommendation may be presented to meet condition (2). It must be clear from the text that residents of certain countries are not required to provide proof of the reason for travel to the country of destination. If this is not possible, then evidence must be provided of the urgent need for entry in accordance with Annex II of the Council Recommendation. Germany’s border control officials will only check for compliance with the requirements for entering Germany. Alternatively, the traveller may present a document issued by the responsible authorities of the country of destination certifying that entry restrictions have been waived or that approval of entry has been granted. 

    Nationals of non-EU countries (third-country nationals) may enter Germany to travel to a third country if the following conditions are met:

    1. the traveller remains in Germany (as country of transit) only as long as absolutely necessary to travel directly to the country of destination or another transit country;
    2. the traveller is permitted to enter the country of destination or another transit country, if applicable.

    The third-country national must provide evidence on the entry that the conditions (1) and (2) listed above have been met. Airline or other travel tickets, etc. may be presented to meet condition (1). To meet condition (2), travellers can present authorisation of entry to the country of destination (e.g. a visa) or an identity document or residence authorisation for the country of destination, for example.

    The obligation to self-isolate at home does not apply in the case of transit through Germany. In this case, however, you are obliged to leave Germany immediately.

    More information is available at Coronavirus and entry restrictions.

    The latest information in German

    *From Third Countries:

    Residents of the following third countries can enter Germany without restrictions: Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

    Upon confirmation of mutual entry possibilities, the list will also include: China, Hong Kong and Macao.

    For all persons residing in a third country that is not mentioned above, restrictions on travel continue to apply and these persons may enter Germany only for urgent reasons.

    Such restrictions do not apply to German citizens. Citizens of EU Member States or Schengen Associated countries, and their family members, are also exempted from travel restrictions. The same applies to third-country nationals who already have a long-term right of residence in an EU member state or a Schengen country (residence permit or long-term visa), and to members of their family.

     

    Unmarried couples

    Unmarried partners may enter Germany from third countries that are not included in the above list, for short-term visits to the partner living in Germany when the general entry requirements (passport and visa, if applicable) are met, under the condition that the couple is in a long-term relationship/partnership and both partners have met in person in Germany at least once, or the couple had a previously shared residence in another country until recently.
    See declaration of the existence of the relationship.

    Provided that the general entry requirements are met, unmarried couples travelling together may enter Germany for short-term visits for urgent reasons from third countries that are not included in the above list:

    • their relationship is a long-term relationship between a third-country national and a German, or EU+ citizen or national and
    • the couple has a shared residence abroad and there is an important reason for both partners to enter Germany. This is generally the case for births, weddings, bereavements/funerals or other exceptional cases in which there is an urgent family reason (e.g. serious illness of a first- or second-degree relative who therefore urgently needs help).

    The urgent reason for the joint entry of both partners is to be submitted in writing on entering Germany, together with a declaration of the existence of the relationship. Additional documentation such as photos, social media posts, postal/email correspondence may also be provided.

    The decision whether to allow entry at the border is at the discretion of the border officials. All travellers must additionally follow the quarantine rules of the relevant federal state of Germany.

     

    Find out more:
    More information is available at the Federal Foreign Office website and the Ministry of Health (in German).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *COVID-19 restrictions: Germany is gradually easing restrictions on social contact, aimed at reducing the spread of COVID-19:
    • From 8 March, private gatherings are restricted to one household plus another household up to a maximum of five people. Children under the age of 14 do not count towards the maximum of five. In regions where the incidence rate is below 35, that can be extended to three households with a maximum of 10 people – under 14 year olds not included
    • employers are legally obliged to allow employees to work from home, where their work activities allow, until 30 April
    • Depending on state and regional incidence rates, retail, outdoor gastronomy, museums, art galleries, and a range of other cultural and leisure activities will be able to open in the coming weeks and months
    • services at churches, mosques and synagogues continue to be allowed as long as 1.5m distancing is maintained, mouth-nose coverings are worn and singing is banned
    • Schools and nurseries are gradually being opened
    Medical grade masks are compulsory in shops and public transport, replacing a previous requirement for simple mouth-nose coverings. Whereas Bavaria requires FFP-2 masks, other states permit a disposable surgical mask. You should follow local guidance. These restrictions are implemented by Germany’s 16 states. Where the seven–day incidence rate exceeds 100, current restrictions may be maintained or re-imposed with limited notice. As rules may vary please check the latest local guidance (in German). There are a variety of sources in English.
    These measures will next be reviewed on 22 March.

    Read more
    16.03.2021
  • Source https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2021-09-28/lufthansa-prepared-for-travel-ramp-up-in-december-apac-vp
    #Europe, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #