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Poland travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -70.46%
Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates
Published on 12.05.2021
LOT Polish Airlines mulls cancellation of B737 MAX, B787-9s.
Source: https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/news/103581-lot-polish-airlines-mulls-cancellation-of-b737-max-b787-9s

Published on 19.01.2021
LOT Polish Airlines will suspend some international and domestic flights from 25 January because of COVID-19 restrictions

Published on 25.10.2020
LOT Polish Airlines suspends flights between Warsaw and Skopje, Podgorica, Dubrovnik until 28 March 2021; its Ljubljana service canceled until 1 December

Published on 17.10.2020
Ryanair Lodz W20 operations as of 16OCT20

Published on 16.10.2020
LOT Polish Airlines revises NW20 Long-Haul charter program

Published on 12.10.2020
LOT Polish Airlines adds Ostrava service from late-Oct 2020

09.10.2020 LOT Polish Airlines in the last few days gradually filed changes to its planned Intercontinental network for winter 2020/21 season, effective 25OCT20 – 27MAR21. Updated operation as of 07OCT20 as follows. Additional changes remain highly possible.

Budapest – New York JFK eff 03DEC20 3 weekly 787-8
Budapest – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly 787-8
Krakow – Chicago O’Hare 20DEC20 – 11JAN21 1 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Beijing Capital 3 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – Chicago O’Hare 4-5 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Colombo eff 02DEC20 3 weekly 787-8/-9
Warsaw – Delhi eff 01DEC20 4 weekly 787-8/-9
Warsaw – New York JFK 4-6 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Nur-Sultan 11DEC20 – 09JAN21 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Seoul Incheon 3 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – Singapore 1 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – Tel Aviv 5 weekly 737-8
Warsaw – Tokyo Narita 1-2 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – Toronto 3 weekly 787-8/-9

Published on 08.10.2020
LOT Polish Airlines W20 Intercontinental network as of 07OCT20

29.09.2020 LOT Polish Airlines during the month of October 2020 plans to operate following service, based on schedule listing as of 25SEP20. Due to various travel restrictions, last minute adjustment remains highly possible.

The following operation covers the period of 01OCT20 – 24OCT20, the remainder of summer 2020 season.

Budapest – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly
Budapest – Wroclaw 1 weekly
Krakow – Chicago O’Hare 1 weekly
Krakow – Gdansk 7 weekly (3 weekly from week of 11OCT20)
Krakow – Szczytno 2 weekly
Stockholm Arlanda – Arvidsjaur – Gallivare 4 weekly
Vilnius – London City 5 weekly
Warsaw – Amsterdam 8 weekly
Warsaw – Athens 1 weekly (week of 04OCT20)
Warsaw – Belgrade 4 weekly
Warsaw – Berlin Tegel 6-7 weekly
Warsaw – Brussels 10 weekly
Warsaw – Bucharest 5 weekly
Warsaw – Budapest 11 weekly
Warsaw – Bydgoszcz 6 weekly
Warsaw – Chicago O’Hare 4 weekly
Warsaw – Copenhagen 9 weekly
Warsaw – Dublin 4 weekly
Warsaw – Dubrovnik 2-3 weekly
Warsaw – Dusseldorf 7 weekly
Warsaw – Frankfurt 9 weekly
Warsaw – Gdansk 21 weekly
Warsaw – Geneva 7 weekly
Warsaw – Hamburg 7 weekly
Warsaw – Istanbul 7 weekly
Warsaw – Kalamata 1 weekly (week of 04OCT20)
Warsaw – Katowice 13 weekly
Warsaw – Krakow 21 weekly
Warsaw – Kyiv Borispil 10 weekly
Warsaw – London Heathrow 9-10 weekly
Warsaw – Lublin 6 weekly
Warsaw – Lviv 7 weekly
Warsaw – Madrid 1-2 weekly
Warsaw – Milan Malpensa 7 weekly
Warsaw – Minsk 4 weekly
Warsaw – Munich 9 weekly
Warsaw – New York JFK 5 weekly
Warsaw – Odessa 7 weekly
Warsaw – Oslo 7 weekly
Warsaw – Paris CDG 6-8 weekly
Warsaw – Poznan 13 weekly
Warsaw – Prague 11 weekly
Warsaw – Riga 4 weekly
Warsaw – Rzeszow 20-23 weekly
Warsaw – Seoul Incheon 3 weekly
Warsaw – Sofia 8 weekly
Warsaw – Split 1 weekly
Warsaw – Stockholm Arlanda 7 weekly
Warsaw – Stuttgart 7 weekly
Warsaw – Szczecin 12 weekly
Warsaw – Tallinn 10 weekly
Warsaw – Tianjin 1 flight from WAW on 14OCT20
Warsaw – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly
Warsaw – Toronto 3 weekly
Warsaw – Venice 4 weekly
Warsaw – Vienna 8 weekly
Warsaw – Vilnius 13 weekly
Warsaw – Wroclaw 20 weekly
Warsaw – Zadar 1 weekly
Warsaw – Zagreb 4-5 weekly
Warsaw – Zakynthos 1 weekly (week of 04OCT20)
Warsaw – Zielona Gora 10 weekly
Warsaw – Zurich 10 weekly

Published on 12.08.2020
LOT Polish Airlines to cancel flights to 45 countries as ban extends because of COVID-19

11.08.2020
LOT Polish Airline
s during the month of September 2020 plans to operate following European routes, as of 10AUG20. This includes service resumption on Vilnius – London City from 31AUG20. Various travel restrictions and market condition may impact the airline’s planned operation.

Note the following list excludes domestic operation.

Budapest – Dubrovnik 1 weekly E195 until 27SEP20
Budapest – Wroclaw 1 weekly Dash8-Q400
Krakow – Dubrovnik 1 weekly Dash8-Q400
Rzeszow – Zadar 1 weekly Dash8-Q400 until 19SEP20
Stockholm – Arvidsjaur – Gallivare 4 weekly CRJ900
Vilnius – London City 12 weekly E190
Warsaw – Amsterdam 14 weekly E190
Warsaw – Barcelona 6 weekly 737-800/E195
Warsaw – Belgrade 3 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Berlin Tegel 12 weekly Dash8/E170
Warsaw – Brussels 20 weekly E175/195
Warsaw – Bucharest 12 weekly E175/190
Warsaw – Budapest 21 weekly Dash8/E170/E175
Warsaw – Chania 1 weekly 737-800 until 26SEP20
Warsaw – Chisinau 4 weekly Dash8-Q400
Warsaw – Copenhagen 12 weekly E195
Warsaw – Corfu 1 weekly 737-800 until 27SEP20
Warsaw – Dublin 4 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Dubrovnik 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Dusseldorf 14 weekly E190/195/737-800
Warsaw – Frankfurt 12 weekly E190/195
Warsaw – Geneva 9 weekly E175/195
Warsaw – Hamburg 11 weekly E170
Warsaw – Istanbul 7 weekly E190/195
Warsaw – Kyiv Borispil 14 weekly E195
Warsaw – Kyiv Zhulyany 6 weekly E175
Warsaw – Larnaca 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Ljubljana 4 weekly Dash8/E175
Warsaw – London Heathrow 14 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Luxembourg 6 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Lviv 12 weekly E170/175/195
Warsaw – Madrid 5 weekly 737-800/E195
Warsaw – Milan Malpensa 10 weekly E190/195
Warsaw – Minsk 4 weekly E170/175/195
Warsaw – Moscow Sheremetyevo 7 weekly E195
Warsaw – Munich 10 weekly E170/175/195
Warsaw – Nice 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Odessa 7 weekly E175
Warsaw – Oslo 10 weekly E190/195
Warsaw – Paris CDG 14 weekly E190/195/737-800
Warsaw – Prague 20 weekly E170/Dash8
Warsaw – Riga 7 weekly E170
Warsaw – Rijeka 1 weekly E175 until 13SEP20
Warsaw – St. Petersburg 7 weekly E715
Warsaw – Skopje 4 weekly E175/195
Warsaw – Sofia 10 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Split 1 weekly 737-800/E195
Warsaw – Stockholm Arlanda 11 weekly E175 (12 weekly from 01OCT20)
Warsaw – Stuttgart 8 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Tallinn 12 weekly E170
Warsaw – Tirana 2 weekly 737-800/E195
Warsaw – Varna 1 weekly E170 until 13SEP20
Warsaw – Venice 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Vienna 14 weekly E190/195
Warsaw – Vilnius 20 weekly E170/175/190
Warsaw – Zadar 1 weekly E195
Warsaw – Zagreb 7 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Zurich 10 weekly E175/190/195

LOTnaWakacje (Holiday program)
Katowice – Dubrovnik 1 weekly E195
Katowice – Thessaloniki 1 weekly E195 until 30SEP20
Poznan – Dubrovnik 1 weekly E195
Warsaw – Athens 2 weelky 737-800/E195 until 04OCT20
Warsaw – Kalamata 1 weekly E195 until 06OCT20
Warsaw – Malaga 1 weekly 737-800 until 03OCT20
Warsaw – Olbia 1 weekly E195 until 25SEP20
Warsaw – Palma Mallorca 1 weekly E195 until 20SEP20
Warsaw – Thira 2 weekly 737-800 until 03OCT20
Warsaw – Zakynthos 2 weekly 737-800 until 05OCT20

LOT Polish Airlines during the month of September 2020 plans to operate following Intercontinental routes, as of 10AUG20. Further changes remain highly possible.

Budapest – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly 787-8
Krakow – Chicago O’Hare 1 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Beijing Capital 3 weekly 787-8 (Schedule not yet confirmed)
Warsaw – Beirut 5 weekly E195 (4 weekly from 21SEP20)
Warsaw – Chicago O’Hare 6 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Delhi 3 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – New York JFK 7 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Nur-Sultan 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 787-8/-9
Warsaw – Tbilisi 7 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Tel Aviv 7 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Tokyo Narita 2 weekly 787-8 (3 weekly from 17SEP20)
Warsaw – Toronto 7 weekly 787-8

Published on 04.08.2020
LOT Polish Airlines adds Wroclaw – Budapest service from late-August 2020

Published on 24.07.2020
LOT Polish Airlines schedules Boeing 787 intra-Europe service in 3Q20

Published on 22.07.2020
LOT Polish Airlines W20 Long-Haul charter network as of 21JUL20

Published on 21.07.2020
LOT Polish Airlines Re-Launches Flights to Seoul

Published on 20.07.2020
LOT Polish Airlines resumes Dublin from late-August 2020

Published on 18.07.2020
LOT to Start Flights to Ireland

10.07.2020 LOT Polish Airlines has extended interim schedule for Inter-continental service, now updated until 31AUG20. From 15JUL20 to 31AUG20, planned Inter-continental operation as follows.

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation and passenger traffic rights.

Budapest – Seoul Incheon eff 20JUL20 1 weekly 787-9 (Previously reported)
Krakow – Chicago O’Hare eff 20JUL20 1 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Chicago O’Hare 6 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Delhi eff 01AUG20 3 weekly 787-8 (schedule listing shows 2 weekly from 18JUL20 with 787-9 in July, however reservation is not available)
Warsaw – New York JFK 5 weekly 787-9 (1 daily from 01AUG20)
Warsaw – Nur-Sultan – Tokyo Narita eff 01AUG20 1 weekly 787-8
Warsaw – Seoul Incheon 2 weekly 787-9 (3 weekly from 19JUL20, 5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Warsaw – Tel Aviv eff 01AUG20 1 daily E195
Warsaw – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-8 (2 weekly from 21JUL20; selected dates by -9)
Warsaw – Toronto 6 weekly 787-8 (selected weeks 5 weekly)
Published on 08.07.2020
LOT Polish Airlines July/August 2020 Inter-continental network as of 08JUL20

29.06.2020 LOT planned operation as of 26JUN20 as follows. Routes marked * represents subject to removal of travel restrictions, however reservation is available.

Budapest – Dubrovnik eff 04JUL20 1 weekly E195
Budapest – Varna eff 04JUL20 1 weekly E195
Warsaw – Amsterdam eff 01JUL20 4 weekly E190/195 instead of 737-800 (1 daily from 15JUL20)
*Warsaw – Belgrade eff 16JUL20 4 weekly E170
Warsaw – Berlin Tegel eff 01JUL20 6 weekly E195 (1 daily E170 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Brussels eff 01JUL20 5 weekly E190 instead of 4 weekly 737-800/E195 (1 daily E190/195 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Bucharest eff 01JUL20 4 weekly E175 instead of E195 (1 daily E175/190 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Budapest eff 01JUL20 1 daily E175/195 instead of E195 (16 weekly E170/175/195 from 16JUL20)
*Warsaw – Chisinau eff 15JUL20 3 weekly Dash8-Q400
Warsaw – Copenhagen eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175/190
Warsaw – Dusseldorf eff 01JUL20 1 daily E195 instead of 737-800
Warsaw – Frankfurt eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175

Warsaw – Geneva eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170/175
Warsaw – Hamburg eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170/175/190
*Warsaw – Istanbul eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170
Warsaw – Kyiv Borispil eff 01JUL20 5 weekly E175 instead of E195 (1 daily E175/190 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Ljubljana eff 16JUL20 4 weekly E170
*Warsaw – London Heathrow eff 15JUL20 1 daily E195
*Warsaw – Lviv eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170/175
Warsaw – Madrid eff 16JUL20 5 weekly E195
Warsaw – Milan Malpensa eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175/190
*Warsaw – Minsk eff 16JUL20 4 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Munich eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170/175
*Warsaw – Nur-Sultan – Tokyo Narita eff 18JUL20 1 weekly 787-8
*Warsaw – Odessa eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175
Warsaw – Oslo eff 02JUL20 3 weekly E195/737-800 instead of 737-800 (1 daily E175/190/195 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Paris CDG eff 15JUL20 1 daily E170/175/190
Warsaw – Prague eff 01JUL20 1 daily E170/175 instead of E195 (2 daily Dash8-Q400/E170 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Riga eff 16JUL20 4 weekly Dash8/E170/175
Warsaw – Stuttgart eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175/190
Warsaw – Tallinn eff 16JUL20 4 weekly E170/175
Warsaw – Vienna eff 02JUL20 5 weekly E175 instead of 4 weekly E195 (2 daily E175 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Vilnius eff 01JUL20 1 daily E170/175 instead of E195 (2 daily E170/175 from 15JUL20)
Warsaw – Zagreb eff 16JUL20 4 weekly E175
Warsaw – Zurich eff 15JUL20 1 daily E175/190

On long-haul routes, the airline’s interim schedule for the period of 01JUL20 – 14JUL20 includes the following:
Warsaw – Chicago O’Hare 3 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – New York JFK 3 weekly 787-8/-9
Warsaw – Seoul Incheon 2 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-9
Warsaw – Toronto 2 weekly 787-8
19.06.2020 LOT Polish Airlines yesterday (18JUN20) opened reservation for its revised European network, for the first half of July 2020. From 01JUL20 to 14JUL20, the Star Alliance carriers plans to operate 22 routes.

Budapest – Dubrovnik eff 04JUL20 1 weekly E195
Budapest – Varna eff 04JUL20 1 weekly E195
Warsaw – Amsterdam eff 01JUL20 4 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Barcelona eff 01JUL20 3 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Berlin Tegel eff 01JUL20 6 weekly E195
Warsaw – Brussels eff 01JUL20 4 weekly 737-800/E195
Warsaw – Bucharest eff 01JUL20 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Budapest eff 01JUL20 1 daily E195
Warsaw – Chania eff 04JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Corfu eff 05JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Dubrovnik eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Dusseldorf eff 01JUL20 1 daily 737-800
Warsaw – Kyiv Borispil eff 01JUL20 5 weekly E195
Warsaw – Oslo eff 02JUL20 3 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Podgorica eff 04JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Prague eff 01JUL20 1 daily E195
Warsaw – Split eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Tbilisi eff 02JUL20 3 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Varna eff 05JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Warsaw – Vienna eff 02JUL20 4 weekly E195
Warsaw – Vilnius eff 01JUL20 1 daily E195
Warsaw – Zadar eff 04JUL20 1 weekly 737-800

Published on 18.06.2020
LOT Polish Airlines resumes additional domestic routes in late-June 2020
LOT Polish Airlines July 2020 European operations as of 18JUN20

11.06.2020

Due to the unstable situation on international aviation markets and numerous travelling restrictions related to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus during the pandemic, Management of LOT Polish Airlines decided to extend the suspension of air services. All LOT passenger flights scheduled until June 30th 2020 have been cancelled.

Published on 21.05.2020
LOT Polish Airlines June 2020 Domestic operations as of 20MAY20

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Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Poland
Crossing Rules

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to spouses, children of nationals of Poland.
– This does not apply to passengers under the constant care of nationals of Poland.
– This does not apply to spouses and children of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
– This does not apply to spouses and children of British nationals.
– This does not apply to passengers traveling as students in Poland.

Special requirements for flights from/to United States
Flights from USA (except airports in Illinois and New York) are suspended.
– This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.

Flights from/to Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Jordan, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Serbia are suspended
Flights from Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Georgia, Jordan, Kosovo (Rep.), North Macedonia (Rep.), Montenegro and Serbia are suspended.
– This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.

Quarantine is possible
Passengers could be subject to quarantine for 10 days. A list of quarantine exemptions can be found at https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/temporary-limitations .

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Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 24 October 2020 to TBD

From 24 October 2020 the RED zone is extended for the whole country.
Currently it is not written anywhere that one can not travel from one city to another and actually on the official page of Polish Government there are written the following information:
THE KEY SAFETY RULES:
I. limitations in movement: 1,5 m = minimum distance between pedestrians (except for parents with kids till 13 years old; people living together; handicap people who can not move independently; people with certificate of special educational needs and their carers; people who cover their mouth & nose. ( valid from 25/07);
II. from 10/10/2020 – mandatory covering of mouth & nose in public space. You must cover mouth&nose in: closed places
(e.g. shops, means of transport) and also in open space (on the street, boulevards, cemeteries). In detail: the mask must be on in: on the streets, roads, squares, cemeteries, promenades,boulevards,parking places, forest parkings; buses, trams, trains; in a car if the person inside is not living with you everyday; shops, malls, banks, markets, post office; cinema & theater; at the doctor’s place, in the medical centre, in the hospital, massage & tatoo centers; in churches, schools & universitie; administrative offices and other public services buildings.
Exceptions, where you do not have to cover mouth&nose includes: in forests, parks, botanic & monumental gardens, family allotment and on the beaches.
Covering mouth & nose in public places is mandatory till recall.
The exemption from this obbligation applies to people with medical certificate or document conferming such need, (this category includes those with total development aberrations, mental disorders, medium & significant intelectual disability, or those who themselves can not cover or uncover mouth or nose.

Rules as for movements:
Children and teenagers till 16 years old – between 8:00 am – 4 pm from Monday to Friday are obbliged to be under supervision of parent or other person taking care of them while going out. This rule is not valid for the time when a child goes to school or is back from school and in weekends.
Seniors: older people shall stay home, especially people over 70 years old. The exceptions regards the following situation: professional activities, satisfaction of indispensable daily life needs, participating or celebrating religious activities.

QUARANTINE – regards people who: a) cross Polish border, being EU external border, b) had contacts with COVID19 infected or potentialy infected people , c) live with person to whom the quarantine was imposed,

The exemption from quarantine, after crossing Polish border, applies to: a) EU countries’ citizens, countries of EFTA members citizens or Swiss Confederation, their spouses & children; b) passengers of the plane during international flight from the airport located in the country not included in a ban of air traffic , except of passengers of a plane during international flight from the airport located in the Republic of Belarus, or Ucraine.
The exemption from mandatory quarantine regards: a) everybod y who studies in Poland (students, post diploma students and specialistic education students, PhD students and all scientists/researchers carrying out scientific activities in Poland); b) foreigners being married or being a child to Polish citizens or remain under their constant care
From 2/09/2020 new rules in place:
– quarantine (separation of a healthy person due to the risk of getting infected);
– isolation (separation of a person whose first result of the diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2 is positive).
Home isolation lasts 10 days if the patient does not present any symptoms of COVID-19. In case during the isolation the symptoms manifest themselves, the GP decides to prolong the isolation and its end can talke place not earlier than 13 days after the symptops manifests. In case of hospital isolation in the isolation room – the end of isolation is decided by the doctor taking care over the patient. It can’t be earlier than 13 days following the manifestation of symptomps and the last 3 days must be without the symptoms of the illness.
The quarantine is imposd by sanitary inspection as for the people crossing the border it was limited to 10 days – at the same time it was renunced to test asymptomatic people in quarantine.
During the quarantine it is forbiden to: leave house, walk the dog, go to the shop or doctor; in case the person on quarantine has close contacts with other people who live in the same house also those must undergo the quarantine. In case of having symptoms of the illness one must call the sanitary-epidemiologic station.
24/10 no obbligation for quarantine for participants of international sports competitions (detailed rule in force, I will copy if requested)
VALID from 20/06/2020
The police make visits to people under quarantine to check if they respect the rules staying at their place. The regulations foresee a fine up to 30k PLN (approx. > 7kEuro)

PUBLIC TRANSPORT
– means of transport can transport – limitations as for the number of people:
in the red zones: 50% of No of seating places or 30% of No of all seating & standing places, however at least 50% of seating places must remain free;
In the whole country, except for the red zones, the public transport can transport no more people than: 100% of seating places or 50% of all seating and standing places, however 50% of seating places must remain free.
VALID TILL RECALL

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 13 June 2020 to TBD

From 13/06 movements inside the EU is allowed. All restrictions regards crossing outside EU borders by foreigners
Poland can be entered only by:
1.Polish citizens, 2. foreigners married to Polish citizen and their children, 3) foreigners with Polish Card,4) diplomats & their families, 5) foreigners with a permanent or fixed right to stay, 6) foreigners with work permit in possess of all due documents, 7) foreigners who are driving cars with people or goods for professional reasons 8) drivers in transit, 9) studets, 10) researchers carrying out their activity in Poland, 11) citizens of EU, EFTA, Swiss Confederation + their spouses and children, 12) foreigners having permanent permit or long term resident of EU, in the territories of other UE countries, EFTA & EEA (European Economic Area) countries, Swiss Confederation + spouses and children in order transit Poland reaching their place of residence or stay, 13) foreigners flying by plane with international flight being citizens of: Georgia, Japan,Canada,New Zeland, Tailand, Corea, Tunisia, Australia or has a stay permit in those countries, 14)those having repatriation visa or being a family of repatriant, 15)foreigners with special professional role in relation to sport championship having due documents, 16) other cases than above in particular situation require consent of the Principal Chief of Border Guards
VALID TILL RECALL

INTERNATIONAL TRAIN MOVEMENT
– allowed railway movement within the internal EU borders
VALID FROM: 22/06/2020.
limitations regards: travels with international trains outside internal borders of EU
VALID TILL RECALL

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Flight Restrictions

published 30.09.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
– This does not apply to spouses, children of nationals of Poland.
– This does not apply to passengers under the constant care of nationals of Poland.
– This does not apply to spouses and children of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
– This does not apply to spouses and children of British nationals.
– This does not apply to passengers traveling as students in Poland.

Flights from/to Argentina, Bahamas, Bahrain, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cabo Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, India, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Maldives, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, United Arab Emirates, United States are suspended
Flights from Argentina, Bahamas, Bahrain, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, India, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Maldives, Moldova (Rep.), Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), Oman, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, USA and United Arab Emirates to Poland are suspended.
– This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.

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Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation- subject to category.

Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days. The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

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Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.

All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival. Accepted tests: PCR, antigen.

Vaccination
COVID-19 Total Vaccination date: 2021-06-21
COVID-19 Total Vaccination: 26665528
COVID-19 Daily Vaccination: 282557
COVID-19 Vacc. (per 100 citizens, %): 70.46
COVID-19 Daily Vacc. (per 1 million citizens): 7466

Vaccination

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Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 30 May 2020 to TBD

All restrictions toward shopping centers and big surfaces shops abolished, no limits for people staying at the same time in the shop, market and post offices, but the obbligation to use gloves/or sanitising hands, covering m&n.
Limits as for people number in shops, markets, post offices- in relation to its surface.
– up to 100 m2 – 5 people for one cash register stand,
– over 100 m2 – 1 person for 15 m2.
From 15/10 new regulation for seniors: from Monday to Friday from 10:00 to 12:00 in a shop, drugstore, pharmacy shop and p ost office there can be only people over 60 years old.
From 24/10 RESTAURANTS – ban for normal activity of restaurants, possible only preparation of food for take away or delivery.

The ban regards also school canteens. The meals can be released only to children from calsses: 1-3 of primary schools and staff with respect to the sanitary measures. only every second table can be occupied, the distance between tables must be at least 1,5 m unless there ia a separation device high at least 1 m,counting from the top of the table.
Hotel restaurants – are allowed but only for hotels’ guests who stay at least 1 night. Consumption only at the table in the sanitary regim.The guests can occupy every second table and distance between ables 1,5 m or separation device 1 m high.
In the whole country the beauty centers, hairdressers, tatoos and estetic centres can be open but only in the sanitary regim. Distance between “working stations” at least 1,5 m or with the separation device high at least 2m from the floor.
In the place where the activity is carried out there can be only staff and served clients (max. 1 person for working station, except for the staff), + person who is taking care of the client in certain cases.
Hotels activity allowed, except for cubs, disco and dancing places. other rules as in case of congresses, restaurants, cultural or sport activity. Swimming pools, fitness centers, gyms only for hotel guests staying at least 1 night.

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 10 October 2020 to TBD

24/10 Cultural events in the closed space can be held with participation of 25% of public, mandatory covering of mouth & nose. Cultural evens in the open air can be organised with distancing 1,5m and covering mouth & nose.
(so every 4th place at the audience, in the alternated rows, in case of not indicated places at the audience – the distance of 1,5m must be kept + covering of m&n – exceptions for children under 13 years old, certified handicaped people, people living together. Valid till recall
from 24/10/2020 GATHERINGS: in the gatherings there can participate max.5 people, mandatory covering of mouth &nose + distance 1,5m. The distance between gatherings can not be lower than 100 m. There is a ban for organising meetings and events, independently from their type – exception events&meetings at home with no more than 20 people.

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Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 24 October 2020 to 08 November 2020

from 24/10 new rules as for the schools: all pupils from classes IV-VIII of the primary school, all pupils from the secondary schools, students of continuous learning institutions, profesional institutions are moving to the on-line remote schooling
Kindergardens and children attending classes I-III go to school as before. Nurseries as before.

from 26/10 – on Universities:
As for Higher education (universities etc.) the lectures& activities are on-line remote mode. The universities’ authorities there can be carried out in a traditional way (phisicaly at university) only activities that due to their specific features can not be done on remote (labs, workshops, professional practices) and the activities foreseen at the last year of the studies of the 1st and 2nd grade and 5 years unified studies.
Special rules for student’s houses.

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Other

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between 30 May 2020 to TBD

From 24/10/2020 limitations regarding participation in religious celebrations (mass or other kind of celebrations). Mandatory mouth&nose covering. In churches the limit is max. 1 person on 7m2, keeping distance not smaller than 1,5 m. If outside keeping distance & covering mouth & nose. Only who celebrates may not cover mouths&nose.

from 24/10 fairs and congresses – they can be organised only on-line
From 10/10/2020
Limitation for the functioning of lunaparks, recreation parks and similar – these places remain closed in red zone.
24/10/2020 Organisation of Weddings, Holy Communion, Consolations after Funerals, and other celebrations & parties for certain circumstances – banned till recall
Night clubs, discotecs and other dancing places: – banned in the whole country, only sports clubs for dancing can be opened.
Valid till recall
SPORT:
24/10 in the whole country suspended activity of: swimming pools, acquaparks, gyms, fitness clubs except for healing activities for patients, professional sportsmen, sport activities or sport events, for students & pupils with school or university activities. In hotels only for hotel guests as above. Suspended also saunas, solarias, massages’ centers and those for loosing weight.
Ban for any dancing activity except for sport dancing clubs.
– people doing sport professionaly do not have to cover m&n; those who do sport for recreation must cover m&n unless they do it in forests, parks, allotments, botanic gardens or beaches.
– In the whole country sport competitions, sport activities and events are organized without the audience.
In the sport competitions, sport activities and events (except for golf fields, tenis corts, stalls and tracetracks for horses, facilities for water and air sports to which the limitations do not apply as for number of people) there can participate no more than 250 participants at the same time, excluding staff for the event.
Valid from 10/10/2020
SANATORIUMS, health resorts, rehabilitation is suspended with a possibility to finish the started periods before the rule entered inot force. The exceptions regards cases where interruption of rehabilitation would seriously worsen the health of the patient.

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Full Restrictions

  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen on 8 May; other COVID restrictions to be relaxed throughout the month (Reuters, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Tighter restrictions are in place in some regions until 1 May. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland until 15 May, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. Outdoor gatherings, celebrations and events are planned to be allowed for up to 25 people from 15 May, and both outdoor and indoor events for up to 50 people from 29 May. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals and you should contact religious venues for more information.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries and cultural centres plan to re-open 4 May. Outdoor theatres, opera houses and cinemas plan to re-open 15 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity), with indoor theatres and cinemas planning to open 21 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity). Libraries are open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    All non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks including large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are open from 4 May. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. From 15 May they plan to partially re-open (outdoor terraces only) and from 29 May re-open indoors and outdoors (maximum 50% capacity).
    Open air sport facilities and grounds are open for up to 25 people and plan to open for up to 50 people from 01 May. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Indoor sporting venues (including swimming pools) are reserved for professionals only and will only open to children and young people in organised groups from 01 May (maximum 50% capacity). Indoor swimming pools plan to open for everyone (up to 50% capacity) from 29 May. Outdoor sports venues plan to allow audiences (up to 25% of normally permitted numbers) from 15 May.
    Gyms, fitness clubs and saunas plan to re-open 28 May with limits on how many people can attend at the same time. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in all regions from 01 May.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of any regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until 8 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants will remain closed until further notice, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests. Spas within hotels will remain closed until further notice.

    Read more
    20.05.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen on 8 May; other COVID restrictions to be relaxed throughout the month (Reuters, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Tighter restrictions are in place in some regions until 1 May. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules. Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland until 15 May, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. Outdoor gatherings, celebrations and events are planned to be allowed for up to 25 people from 15 May, and both outdoor and indoor events for up to 50 people from 29 May. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals and you should contact religious venues for more information.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries and cultural centres plan to re-open 4 May. Outdoor theatres, opera houses and cinemas plan to re-open 15 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity), with indoor theatres and cinemas planning to open 29 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity). Libraries are open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks including large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are closed until 4 May (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. From 15 May they plan to partially re-open (outdoor terraces only) and from 29 May re-open indoors and outdoors (maximum 50% capacity).
    Open air sport facilities and grounds are open for up to 25 people and plan to open for up to 50 people from 01 May. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Indoor sporting venues (including swimming pools) are reserved for professionals only and will only open to children and young people in organised groups from 01 May (maximum 50% capacity). Indoor swimming pools plan to open for everyone (up to 50% capacity) from 29 May. Outdoor sports venues plan to allow audiences (up to 25% of normally permitted numbers) from 15 May.
    Gyms, fitness clubs and saunas plan to re-open 29 May with limits on how many people can attend at the same time. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will fully re-open in all regions from 01 May.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of any regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).

    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until 8 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants will remain closed until further notice, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests. Spas within hotels will remain closed until further notice.

    Read more
    19.05.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen on 8 May; other COVID restrictions to be relaxed throughout the month (Reuters, 28.04.2021). Hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Tighter restrictions are in place in some regions until 1 May. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules. Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland until 15 May, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. Outdoor gatherings, celebrations and events are planned to be allowed for up to 25 people from 15 May, and both outdoor and indoor events for up to 50 people from 29 May. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals and you should contact religious venues for more information.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries and cultural centres plan to re-open 4 May. Outdoor theatres, opera houses and cinemas plan to re-open 15 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity), with indoor theatres and cinemas planning to open 29 May (with maximum 50% audience capacity). Libraries are open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks including large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are closed until 4 May (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. From 15 May they plan to partially re-open (outdoor terraces only) and from 29 May re-open indoors and outdoors (maximum 50% capacity).
    Open air sport facilities and grounds are open for up to 25 people and plan to open for up to 50 people from 01 May. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Indoor sporting venues (including swimming pools) are reserved for professionals only and will only open to children and young people in organised groups from 01 May (maximum 50% capacity). Indoor swimming pools plan to open for everyone (up to 50% capacity) from 29 May. Outdoor sports venues plan to allow audiences (up to 25% of normally permitted numbers) from 15 May.
    Gyms, fitness clubs and saunas plan to re-open 29 May with limits on how many people can attend at the same time. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will fully re-open in all regions from 01 May.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of any regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).

    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until 8 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants will remain closed until further notice, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests. Spas within hotels will remain closed until further notice.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen on 8 May; other COVID restrictions to be relaxed throughout the month (Reuters, 28.04.2021). Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and tighter restrictions are in place in some regions. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with only one person per 20m² permitted. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are also closed. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Open air sport facilities and grounds can re-open for up to 25 people. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Otherwise, indoor sporting events are not permitted and indoor sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will remain closed in others.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until at least 3 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    29.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen on 8 May; other COVID restrictions to be relaxed throughout the month (Reuters, 28.04.2021). Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and tighter restrictions are in place in some regions. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with only one person per 20m² permitted. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are also closed. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Open air sport facilities and grounds can re-open for up to 25 people. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Otherwise, indoor sporting events are not permitted and indoor sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will remain closed in others.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until at least 3 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and tighter restrictions are in place in some regions. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with only one person per 20m² permitted. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are also closed. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Open air sport facilities and grounds can re-open for up to 25 people. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Otherwise, indoor sporting events are not permitted and indoor sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will remain closed in others.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until at least 3 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    27.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and tighter restrictions are in place in some regions. The Polish Government’s website (in Polish) explains which regions have tighter rules.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with only one person per 20m² permitted. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are also closed. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Open air sport facilities and grounds can re-open for up to 25 people. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Otherwise, indoor sporting events are not permitted and indoor sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed. Hairdressers and beauty salons are open in some regions from 26 April and will remain closed in others.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until at least 3 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    23.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Until at least 25 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops are also closed. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. From 19 April, open air sport facilities and grounds can re-open for up to 25 people. Children and young people may take part in sports activities run by sporting associations. Otherwise, indoor sporting events are not permitted and indoor sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. Seehere (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    -Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed until at least 3 May, except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    16.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.04.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Until at least 18 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel : You can enter and depart Poland by road over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    15.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government to extend most COVID-19 restrictions until 25 April; hotels to remain closed until 3 May (Reuters, 14.03.2021). Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Until at least 18 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel : You can enter and depart Poland by road over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    14.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 restrictions until 18 April (Reuters, 07.04.2021). Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Until at least 18 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel : You can enter and depart Poland by road over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    08.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

    Accepted tests: PCR, antigen

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test (PCR or antigen), are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel information (in Polish)
    Quarantine rules from 30 March (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, must complete a 10-day quarantine, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test after arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will be able to shorten the 10-day quarantine by taking a COVID-19 test upon arrival in Poland. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    01.04.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative PCR test, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions. EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence. Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative PCR test, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    The quarantine period may be ended by taking a PCR test after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers will also be able to take a test for COVID-19 infection upon arrival in Poland. If the result is negative, quarantine will be lifted. 

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 48 hours prior to arrival.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, who do not provide a pre-departure negative PCR test, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia – also those who cross the border by car – must quarantine for 10 days.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions: *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 27 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place. The Polish Government advice is to stay at home where possible.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals, with churches only permitted one person per 15m². There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums, art galleries, theatres, opera houses, casinos and cinemas are all closed. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    Non-essential shops in shopping malls and retail parks are closed (supermarkets and pharmacies remain open). Large DIY, homeware and furniture shops will also be closed from 27 March. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences and from 27 March sports facilities are reserved for professionals only. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are closed. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks as well as tanning salons, hairdressers, massage salons and saunas, also remain closed.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling as appointments may be limited.
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing).
    Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are closed except for business trips and to accommodate workers. If you have a reservation check directly with your accommodation provider for refund policies or to check your reason for stay is permitted. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed where the hotel has guests.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car.

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-countries outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described above.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 20 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place on non-essential retail, cultural institutions and hotels in Poland .
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions. EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions. Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described above.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 20 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place on non-essential retail, cultural institutions and hotels in Poland .
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    25.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Partial lockdown in Poland extended for three weeks (BBC, 22.03.2021). Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 20 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place on non-essential retail, cultural institutions and hotels in Poland .
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    23.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021). Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a quarantine required? Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car.

    Is a coronavirus test required? Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

    Find out more: Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border Travel information (in Polish) Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions. EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions. Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. From 20 March until at least 9 April tighter restrictions will be in place on non-essential retail, cultural institutions and hotels in Poland .
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    19.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021). Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car. 

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have ot quarantine. 

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    People who have recovered from COVID-19 infection and present proof of hospitalisation or isolation in the past 6 months do not have to quarantine.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    16.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels will close as government reintroduces COVID-19 restrictions in Lubuskie and Mazowieckie regions (Reuters, 11.03.2021). Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car. 

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    12.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car. 

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    09.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car. 

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    Beginning tomorrow, February 27, the Polish government will institute the following new restrictions:
    -Face coverings must be cloth or medical-type masks. Face shields, visors, scarves, or other types of face coverings are not permitted as substitutes for masks. Masks must be worn in all indoor and outdoor public spaces, except for parks, forests, and beaches.
    – All travelers entering Poland from Czechia and Slovakia are subject to a 10-day quarantine, except for travelers who provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test result received within the past 48 hours or proof of vaccination.
    – In the Warminsko-Mazurskie Province, shopping malls, hotels, movie theaters, and other similar public spaces are closed, and schools are moved to virtual classes only. o All other country-wide restrictions currently in place will continue, including:
    -Restaurants and bars are closed for in-person dining, with delivery and take-away service only.
    – Only 50% of seats or 30% of all space may be used on public transport.
    – Only five people per cashier allowed in stores of up to 100 square meters. In stores over 100 square meters, one person is allowed for every 15 square meters.
    – Only one person per 15 square meters allowed in churches.
    – Seniors, especially people over age 70, are advised to limit their movements in public spaces, apart from their professional activities, fulfilling daily needs, or attending religious services. A helpline for seniors has been established at +48 22 505 1111.

    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    02.03.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry. In addition, all travellers returning from the Czech Republic and Slovakia must quarantine, also those who cross the border by car. 

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    26.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide.
    Facemasks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear facemasks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a facemask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. Bandanas, scarves, balaclavas and visors are not permitted alternatives to facemasks. Your mouth and nose must be covered. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a facemask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a facemask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a facemask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Facemasks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity.
    Facemasks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a facemask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Some regions may have stricter rules in place. See here
    (in Polish) for details of regions with stricter rules.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Check country specific FCDO travel advice for any country that you plan to transit during your journey.
    Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    25.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity. Masks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    23.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity. Masks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    19.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity. Masks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    16.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021). Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on wedding receptions and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, opera houses and cinemas are open with maximum 50% capacity. Masks must be worn during performances and you are not allowed to purchase food or drink. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Casinos are open with limits on customer numbers.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Swimming pools, tennis courts and outdoor sports facilities, including ski slopes, are open. Gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks remain closed.
    Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter
    pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available between London and Poland (journey times are in excess of 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights between the UK and Poland are operating. Routes, carriers and availability vary and are based on demand.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are open with maximum 50% occupancy rates. Hotel restaurants are closed, but room service is allowed. Other kinds of accommodation are also operating.

    Read more
    12.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021). Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Find out more:
    Border Guard: restrictions on the Polish border

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    Travellers from third-country outside the EU and Schengen Area are subject to the rules described hereafter.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Third-country travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    From 23 January 2021, travellers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are not subject to compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed within 48 hours prior to entering Poland.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, cinemas and cultural centres are closed.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice
    .
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    09.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Hotels to reopen from mid-February as government relaxes some COVID-19 restrictions (Reuters, 05.02.2021). Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    NO.

    But, from January 23, people with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are released from compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed before crossing the limit. The test is valid for 48 hours after receiving the result.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Thailand, South Korea, and China may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, cinemas and cultural centres are closed.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice
    .
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    05.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    NO.

    But, from January 23, people with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result are released from compulsory quarantine. The test must be performed before crossing the limit. The test is valid for 48 hours after receiving the result.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Thailand, South Korea, and China may enter Poland without additional restrictions.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions such as museums and art galleries are allowed to open. Consult websites for opening hours and restrictions before visiting. Theatres, cinemas and cultural centres are closed.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Shops, shopping malls and retail parks are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided.
    Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open.
    Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates and changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice
    .
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    02.02.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    You do not have to quarantine on arrival if you can present a negative Covid-19 test certificate issued within 48 hours before crossing the Polish border.
    *From within the EU:

    Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    NO.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

     

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 31 January 2021.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas
    and cultural centres will be closed until at least 31 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain op
    en. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    29.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    You do not have to quarantine on arrival if you can present a negative Covid-19 test certificate issued within 48 hours before crossing the Polish border.
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 31 January 2021.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas
    and cultural centres will be closed until at least 31 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain op
    en. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    26.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    You do not have to quarantine on arrival if you can present a negative Covid-19 test certificate issued within 48 hours before crossing the Polish border.
    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    .

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 31 January 2021.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas
    and cultural centres will be closed until at least 31 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain op
    en. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    23.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    .

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 31 January 2021.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas
    and cultural centres will be closed until at least 31 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain op
    en. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    22.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers arriving in Poland by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of entry.

    vaccination-benefits Provisions for vaccinated people

    Travellers who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are exempted from compulsory quarantine (a certificate of vaccination is needed).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    General rules
    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 31 January 2021.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times.
    Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas
    and cultural centres will be closed until at least 31 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain op
    en. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place.
    Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling.
    For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    15.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers that cross the Polish internal EU border by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of crossing the border.

    If you have been vaccinated for COVID-19, you will not be placed in quarantine.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    General rules

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    For a selection of countries, civil aircrafts originating from these territories are prohibited from landing in Poland.

    The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 17 January 2021. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see thePolish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to: • uniformed workers; • medics, patients or caregivers; • sports players, coaches or members of training staff; • members of aircraft or train crew; • road transport drivers; • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams; • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings; • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members; • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    13.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Note: Poland adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for Poland are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    All travellers that cross the Polish internal EU border by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of crossing the border.

    If you have been vaccinated for COVID-19, you will not be placed in quarantine.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    General rules

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is partially permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    For a selection of countries, civil aircrafts originating from these territories are prohibited from landing in Poland.

    The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 17 January 2021. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available to London from Poland (journey times are around 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights from the UK to Poland are suspended until at least 13 January.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    08.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: Poland’s government extends ban on passenger flights from U.K. until 13 January because of new strain of COVID-19 (Urdu Point, 05.01.2021). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    All travellers that cross the Polish internal EU border by plane, bus, or other means of public transport, are required to quarantine for 10 days, counting from the day following the day of crossing the border.

    If you have been vaccinated for COVID-19, you will not be placed in quarantine.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    General rules

    Travel information (in Polish)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    *Transit: Transit is permitted.
    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 22.12.2020 until 06.01.2021 , the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide until at least 17 January 2021. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. There is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. Shopping malls and retail parks are closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Restaurants, cafes and pubs are closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums, ski slopes and aqua parks remain closed. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Coach services are available to London from Poland (journey times are around 24 hours including channel crossing). Flights from the UK to Poland are suspended until at least 13 January.
    *Accommodation: Hotels are currently only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    05.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: UK nationals and non-EU/EEA nationals resident in the UK or another non-EU/EEA country will not be permitted entry to Poland from 01 January 2021 for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. (Gov.uk, 31.12.2020). Polish government suspends flights from U.K. from 22 December until at least 6 January. (Reuters, 20.12.2020). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Citizens of EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 22.12.2020 until 06.01.2021 , the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December. A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in certain circumstances such as carrying out official, professional or business activities, seeking medical assistance or other essential activity. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during this time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 28 December, hotels are only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    04.01.2021
  • Poland Latest News: UK nationals and non-EU/EEA nationals resident in the UK or another non-EU/EEA country will not be permitted entry to Poland from 01 January 2021 for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. (Gov.uk, 31.12.2020). Polish government suspends flights from U.K. from 22 December until at least 6 January. (Reuters, 20.12.2020). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    Flights from UK to Poland are suspended from midnight 21 December until at least 6 January.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Citizens of EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 22.12.2020 until 06.01.2021 , the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December. A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in certain circumstances such as carrying out official, professional or business activities, seeking medical assistance or other essential activity. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during this time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 28 December, hotels are only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    30.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Polish government suspends flights from U.K. from 22 December until at least 6 January. (Reuters, 20.12.2020). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    Flights from UK to Poland are suspended from midnight 21 December until at least 6 January.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Citizens of EU Member States and Schengen Associated Countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:
    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 22.12.2020 until 06.01.2021 , the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December. A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in certain circumstances such as carrying out official, professional or business activities, seeking medical assistance or other essential activity. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during this time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 28 December, hotels are only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    28.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Polish government suspends flights from U.K. from 22 December until at least 6 January. (Reuters, 20.12.2020). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 22.12.2020 until 06.01.2021 , the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York), the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December. A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in certain circumstances such as carrying out official, professional or business activities, seeking medical assistance or other essential activity. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during this time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. You do not need to wear a mask in a private car. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops providing essential services or goods (hairdressers, grocery shops, telecommunications, books, pharmacies, drug stores, pet stores, opticians and furniture stores). Petrol stations, car washes and car/motorbike repair centres remain open. Banks, insurance providers and post offices also remain open. Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Libraries may open with strict sanitary procedures in place. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. Administrative offices may open with limited numbers inside at any one time. You might find some offices are only open by appointment and you are recommended to check websites or contact the office before travelling. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 28 December, hotels are only open to:
    • uniformed workers;
    • medics, patients or caregivers;
    • sports players, coaches or members of training staff;
    • members of aircraft or train crew;
    • road transport drivers;
    • critical infrastructure employees or oil sector workers;
    • participants in or co-ordinators of vocational or professional exams;
    • litigants, defence attorneys or parties to court proceedings;
    • members of diplomatic or international organisations or their family members;
    • seasonal workers.
    If you are unsure if you meet the exemption requirements, contact the hotel provider before booking. Other types of accommodation may remain open but this could change at short notice.

    Read more
    24.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Polish government suspends flights from U.K. from 22 December until at least 6 January. (Reuters, 20.12.2020). All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 09.12.2020, the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York). The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December.
    A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in exceptional circumstances. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during that time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops selling essential items (food, books, pharmacies, drug stores and furniture stores).
    Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Flights between Poland and the UK are suspended from midnight 21 December until at least 6 January.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    22.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 09.12.2020, the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in Illinois and New York). The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board.

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide and on 17 December announced an extension of restrictions until at least 17 January 2021, including some new restrictions planned from 28 December. A nationwide ban on movement and travel will be introduced from 7pm on 31 December to 6am on 1 January. During this time you will not be able to leave your accommodation except in exceptional circumstances. The Polish Government encourages households not to mix with other households during that time. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult.
    Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed until at least 17 January 2021. National Forests, parks and beaches are open but could be closed at short notice.
    Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10am to 12 noon on weekdays for those aged 60 and over. These apply to shops, pharmacies and post offices. From 28 December, shopping malls and retail parks will be closed, except for some shops selling essential items (food, books, pharmacies, drug stores and furniture stores). Since 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs have been closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks have also been closed nationwide since 24 October. Ski slopes are scheduled to be closed from 28 December. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people, but these could be closed at short notice.
    For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice. Daily flights are available, though cancellations may take place at short notice as the situation quickly changes.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    18.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All hotels will close as country enters national quarantine from 28 December to 17 January (Reuters, 17.12.2020). Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 25.11.2020, the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in  Illinois and New York). The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board. 

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 27 December. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 28 November shopping malls and retail parks will be open with strict sanitary procedures in place. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    15.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government extends ban on international flights to nine countries until 31 December (FirstNews, 08.12.2020). Government bans passenger flights to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Argentina, Armenia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, Macedonia and the USA- Illinois and New York exempt. (The First News, 10.11.2020). Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 25.11.2020, the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in  Illinois and New York). The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board. 

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 27 December. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 28 November shopping malls and retail parks will be open with strict sanitary procedures in place. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    11.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government bans passenger flights to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Argentina, Armenia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, Macedonia and the USA- Illinois and New York exempt. (The First News, 10.11.2020). Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries:

    Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia and Australia may enter Poland.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while the country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. As of 25.11.2020, the following international flights shall be banned from landing: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Armenia, Kosovo, Serbia, North Macedonia, United States of America (except for the airports in  Illinois and New York). The ban on flights does not apply to countries that notified Poland of the implementation of solutions ensuring that only passengers with a negative SARS-CoV-2 test result will be allowed to be taken on board. 

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 27 December. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 28 November shopping malls and retail parks will be open with strict sanitary procedures in place. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    08.12.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government bans passenger flights to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Argentina, Armenia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, Macedonia and the USA- Illinois and New York exempt. (The First News, 10.11.2020). Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish government has strict sanitary rules and restrictions in place nationwide. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8am to 4pm on weekdays, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. Private gatherings may include no more than 5 people, excluding household members – these rules on indoor gatherings will also be in place over the Christmas period. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 27 December. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 28 November shopping malls and retail parks will be open with strict sanitary procedures in place. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events continue to be suspended until further notice. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    *Accommodation: From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    27.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government bans passenger flights to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Argentina, Armenia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, Macedonia and the USA- Illinois and New York exempt. (The First News, 10.11.2020). Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions.

    EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Find out more:

    https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 29 November.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. All shops in shopping malls are to close from 7 November, until at least 29 November. This excludes supermarkets, pharmacies, drugstores, pet supply stores, newsagents, DIY stores and services such as hairdressers. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events have been suspended from 7 November, until at least 29 November. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    17.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government bans passenger flights to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Georgia, Jordan, Argentina, Armenia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, Macedonia and the USA- Illinois and New York exempt. (The First News, 10.11.2020). Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Mandatory Travel Documentation- A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: here.

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 29 November.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. All shops in shopping malls are to close from 7 November, until at least 29 November. This excludes supermarkets, pharmacies, drugstores, pet supply stores, newsagents, DIY stores and services such as hairdressers. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events have been suspended from 7 November, until at least 29 November. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    11.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Mandatory Travel Documentation- A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: here

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 29 November.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. All shops in shopping malls are to close from 7 November, until at least 29 November. This excludes supermarkets, pharmacies, drugstores, pet supply stores, newsagents, DIY stores and services such as hairdressers. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events have been suspended from 7 November, until at least 29 November. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    06.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. Mandatory Travel Documentation- A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. Find out more: https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities. Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes.
    Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. Cultural institutions, such as museums, theatres, cinemas and cultural centres will be closed from 7 November, until at least 29 November.
    National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Customer numbers are limited in shops. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. All shops in shopping malls are to close from 7 November, until at least 29 November. This excludes supermarkets, pharmacies, drugstores, pet supply stores, newsagents, DIY stores and services such as hairdressers. From 24 October, restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. All cultural events have been suspended from 7 November, until at least 29 November. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    From 7 November, hotels are only open for those travelling for business reasons. Other types of accommodation remain open but this may be subject to change at short notice.

    Read more
    05.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. Mandatory Travel Documentation- A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. Find out more: https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue you should consult their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Only five customers per till are permitted inside shops or one person per 15 square metres in large stores. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 24 October restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open with limited numbers and strict sanitary rules. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set further local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels and short-term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    03.11.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. * Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue you should consult their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Only five customers per till are permitted inside shops or one person per 15 square metres in large stores. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 24 October restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open with limited numbers and strict sanitary rules. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set further local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels and short-term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    30.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government plans to extend ban on international flights to 10 November (The First News, 24.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From the EU: Entry Restrictions: Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: here.

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue you should consult their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Only five customers per till are permitted inside shops or one person per 15 square metres in large stores. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 24 October restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open with limited numbers and strict sanitary rules. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set further local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels and short-term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    27.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From the EU: Entry Restrictions: Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, specific travel advice
    is available for each country. *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: here.

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland a red zone from 24 October. As a result, strict sanitary rules and restrictions are in place. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you must carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 metre distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. All children up to the age of 16 must remain at home between 8 am to 4 pm, unless accompanied by an adult. Seniors, aged 70 and over have been requested to stay at home, leaving only for work or necessities.
    Public gatherings are limited to 5 people in all of Poland, excluding households bigger than 5 members and workplaces. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. From 24 October there is a nationwide ban on weddings and wakes. Public transport is operating with 50% capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn at all times. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue you should consult their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. Only five customers per till are permitted inside shops or one person per 15 square metres in large stores. This might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. ‘Seniors only’ hours are in place between 10 am to 12 noon on weekdays. These hours are in place in shops, pharmacies and post offices, and apply to those aged 60 and over. From 24 October restaurants, cafes and pubs will be closed, and can only provide a takeaway/delivery service. Hairdressers remain open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open with limited numbers and strict sanitary rules. Sporting events are not permitted with audiences but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information. Swimming pools, gyms, sanatoriums and aqua parks will be closed nationwide from 24 October. Indoor play centres, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours remain open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates changes in restrictions see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map). The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set further local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    *Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    *Accommodation: Hotels and short-term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    23.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From the EU: Entry Restrictions: Citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, specific travel advice
    is available for each country. *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: here.

    *Transit: Transit is permitted

    *From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland an amber zone from 10 October: as a result, strict sanitary rules are in place. Even stricter rules are in place in the higher risk red zones which from 17 October include many tourist areas and major cities. Follow the advice of the local authorities if travelling to red zones.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you should carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Public gatherings are limited to 10 people in red zones and 25 people in amber zones. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals.
    From 19 October you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 20 people in amber zones. Weddings and wakes are banned in red zones from 19 October.
    Public transport is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis.
    Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    In red zones only five customers per till are permitted inside shops which might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open with limits on opening hours but you must only take off your mask when seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Congresses, fairs and sporting events are limited to lower spectator numbers.
    In red zones they are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information.
    Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open in amber zones, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. In red zones swimming pools and gyms will be closed from 17 October.
    For updates on areas with stricter measures in place which are labelled red and amber zones see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Accommodation: Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    20.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry Restrictions: Citizens of EU+ countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, specific travel advice is available for each country. *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. *Find out more: Poland Traveland Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: Transit is permitted.

    *Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland an amber zone from 10 October: as a result, strict sanitary rules are in place. Even stricter rules are in place in the higher risk red zones which from 17 October include many tourist areas and major cities. Follow the advice of the local authorities if travelling to red zones.
    Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland, apart from parks, forests and National Parks. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you should carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    Public gatherings are limited to 10 people in red zones and 25 people in amber zones. There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals.
    From 19 October you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 20 people in amber zones. Weddings and wakes are banned in red zones from 19 October.
    Public transport is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis.
    Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open.
    In red zones only five customers per till are permitted inside shops which might mean you have to queue for entry. In all areas of Poland a mask must be worn inside shops and hand sanitiser must be used where provided. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open with limits on opening hours but you must only take off your mask when seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Congresses, fairs and sporting events are limited to lower spectator numbers.
    In red zones they are not permitted with audiences, but may take place without an audience. Cultural events can take place with 25% audience capacity. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information.
    Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open in amber zones, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. In red zones swimming pools and gyms will be closed from 17 October.
    For updates on areas with stricter measures in place which are labelled red and amber zones see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Accommodation: Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    16.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU: Citizens of EU+ countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.
    *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych”>specific travel advice is available for each country.
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Transit: Transit is permitted.

    From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The Polish Government has declared the whole of Poland an amber zone from 10 October meaning stricter sanitary rules are in place. Some higher risk areas of the country are referred to as red zones. These areas include tourist destinations and even stricter rules are in place in these areas. Follow the advice of the local authorities if travelling to red zones. Masks are compulsory in open public spaces across Poland. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. If there are medical reasons why you cannot wear a mask, you should carry a doctor’s note with you explaining this. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    You must also wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    There are restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. You are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 75 people in amber zones, 50 people in red zones. Public transport is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis.
    Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must wear a mask and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers.
    Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open with limits on opening hours but you must only take off your mask when seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open.
    Congresses, fairs, sporting events and cultural events (including concerts) from 10 October will be limited to much lower spectator numbers. In red zones they will be cancelled. If you have tickets for an event that may be affected check with event organisers for further information. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place including limits on numbers of people. For updates on areas with stricter measures in place which are labelled red and amber zones see the Polish Ministry for Health’s Twitter pages (in Polish – look for the colour coded map).
    The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In areas with high infection rates, the authorities may set local restrictions at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure.
    Road and air travel: You can enter and depart Poland by car or coach over some land border crossings, though the situation could change quickly. Countries neighbouring Poland may introduce border restrictions at short notice.
    Accommodation: Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    09.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU: Citizens of EU+ countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed.
    *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych”>specific travel advice is available for each country.
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights.

    Transit: Transit is permitted.

    From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    07.10.2020
  • Poland Latest News: All flights between countries belonging to Schengen Zone will resume from 30 September (The First News, 28.09.2020). Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU: Entry Restrictions- Citizens of EU+ countries, as well as their spouses and children, are allowed to enter Poland without restrictions. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders remain closed. *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland- When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against travel to some countries – an updated list is available at Koronavirus – Travel abroad. Additionally, specific travel advice is available for each country. *Mandatory Travel Documentation- A Passenger Locator Form and a Public Health Self Declaration are requested on flights. * Find out more: here

    Transit: Transit is permitted.

    From Third Countries: Citizens and residents of Georgia, Japan, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, South Korea, Tunisia, and Australia may enter Poland.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    30.09.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. *Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice. *Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union have been resumed, except for Spain, Malta, Luxembourg and Romania. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended. *Links to relevant national sources: here.

    Transit: As above.

    From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available here..

    Internal Restrictions:
    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    23.09.2020
  • Poland Latest News: Government restricts ban on flights to France, Belize, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Brazil, Bahrain, Spain, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Libya, Argentina, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Columbia, Costa Rica, Lebanon, The Maldives, Moldova, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Cape Verde, the U.S., Bolivia, and The Bahamas (Poland in, 16.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    **From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. **Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union have been resumed, except for Spain, Malta, Luxembourg and Romania.
    International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit: As Above

    **Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations./

    Internal Restrictions:
    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    18.09.2020
  • Poland *****

    International restrictions:

    ***From EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. **Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union have been resumed, except for Spain, Malta, Luxembourg and Romania.
    International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    ***Transit: As Above

    ***Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations./

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    11.09.2020
  • Poland *****

    International restrictions:

    Entry checks remain in place on land borders with Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Some countries also have checks in place on exiting Poland and if you travel to another country from Poland you may need to self-isolate in that country.
    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice here **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union have been resumed, except for United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain and Portugal. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit Travellers: As above.

    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available here .

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    07.09.2020
  • Poland Flights from 46 countries will be banned starting 2 September (Reuters, 27.08.2020) Government plans to extend flight ban to 63 territories from 26 August. Removed from the list of banned countries would be: China, Russia, Gabon, Singapore, Serbia, as well as Sao Tome and Principe. Added to the list of banned countries and territories would be: Aruba, Belize, Venezuela, Gibraltar, Monaco, Belgium, Spain, Libya, French Polynesia, Albania, the Philippines, Gambia, India, Lebanon, Malta, Namibia, Paraguay, San Marino, Romania, St Maarten, Guam, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the Faroe Islands. (The First News, 21.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych] **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union have been resumed, except for United Kingdom, Sweden, Spain and Portugal. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit Travellers: As above.

    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    03.09.2020
  • Poland On August 31, the Polish government, by order No. 1498, updated the list of countries, flights from which are prohibited.

    It includes 44 states. Compared to the first version of the list, Belize, Spain, Albania, India, Malta, Romania appeared in it.

    At the same time, the Polish authorities canceled the ban on flights from Russia, China, Singapore and Saudi Arabia.

    Ukraine was at risk. According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Poland, it was planned to include states where the number of COVID-19 cases in the last 2 weeks in the intersection per 100 thousand population exceeded 50.

    The Ministry of Health of Ukraine in updated statistics for August 30, 2020 indicated that this figure is 68.1. However, despite this, the Polish government decided not to stop flights from Ukraine.

    The new regulation comes into force on September 2, 2020 and will be valid until September 15, 2020.

    avianews.com

    Read more
    01.09.2020
  • Poland Flights from 46 countries will be banned starting 2 September (Reuters, 27.08.2020) Government plans to extend flight ban to 63 territories from 26 August. Removed from the list of banned countries would be: China, Russia, Gabon, Singapore, Serbia, as well as Sao Tome and Principe. Added to the list of banned countries and territories would be: Aruba, Belize, Venezuela, Gibraltar, Monaco, Belgium, Spain, Libya, French Polynesia, Albania, the Philippines, Gambia, India, Lebanon, Malta, Namibia, Paraguay, San Marino, Romania, St Maarten, Guam, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the Faroe Islands. (The First News, 21.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland
    When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice: [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych]. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit Travellers: As above.

    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Since 27 August the city of Krakow has been placed under stricter sanitary rules due to an increase in Covid cases. The tighter restrictions in place include: Congress and fair organisers reducing numbers of participants based on the size of the venue; Weddings and other family gatherings limited to 100 guests (as opposed to 150); Sporting events, theatres, cinemas and other cultural events required to reduce spectators to 25% (from the national 50%). The situation in Krakow will be monitored by Polish authorities and could change at short notice.

    Read more
    28.08.2020
  • Poland Flights from 46 countries will be banned starting 2 September (Reuters, 27.08.2020) Government plans to extend flight ban to 63 territories from 26 August. Removed from the list of banned countries would be: China, Russia, Gabon, Singapore, Serbia, as well as Sao Tome and Principe. Added to the list of banned countries and territories would be: Aruba, Belize, Venezuela, Gibraltar, Monaco, Belgium, Spain, Libya, French Polynesia, Albania, the Philippines, Gambia, India, Lebanon, Malta, Namibia, Paraguay, San Marino, Romania, St Maarten, Guam, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the Faroe Islands. (The First News, 21.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland
    When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice: [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych]. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit Travellers: As above.

    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    27.08.2020
  • Poland Government plans to extend flight ban to 63 territories from 26 August. Removed from the list of banned countries would be: China, Russia, Gabon, Singapore, Serbia, as well as Sao Tome and Principe. Added to the list of banned countries and territories would be: Aruba, Belize, Venezuela, Gibraltar, Monaco, Belgium, Spain, Libya, French Polynesia, Albania, the Philippines, Gambia, India, Lebanon, Malta, Namibia, Paraguay, San Marino, Romania, St Maarten, Guam, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the Faroe Islands. (The First News, 21.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland
    When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities. Country specific travel advice: [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych]. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.

    **Transit Travellers: As above.

    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    25.08.2020
  • Poland Government plans to extend flight ban to 63 territories from 26 August. Removed from the list of banned countries would be: China, Russia, Gabon, Singapore, Serbia, as well as Sao Tome and Principe. Added to the list of banned countries and territories would be: Aruba, Belize, Venezuela, Gibraltar, Monaco, Belgium, Spain, Libya, French Polynesia, Albania, the Philippines, Gambia, India, Lebanon, Malta, Namibia, Paraguay, San Marino, Romania, St Maarten, Guam, Turks and Caicos, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the Faroe Islands. (The First News, 21.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. **Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych].**Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    21.08.2020
  • Poland The Polish government wants to extend its ban on international flights to August 25, with 45 countries on the banned list. The list includes: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Saint Thomas and Prince, Russia, Brazil, Andorra, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Swaziland, Mexico, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Gabon, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Colombia, Kosovo, Costa Rica, Macedonia, Maldives, Moldova, Panama, Peru, South Africa, El Salvador, Serbia, Singapore, Suriname, Cape Verde, Romania, United States, Oman, Luxembourg, Bolivia, Bahamas.(The First News, 08.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. **Travelling from Poland or returning to Poland: When deciding to leave, you must face possible difficulties in returning to the country, restrictions on air traffic, the obligation to quarantine or self-isolation, and to carry out additional medical examinations on behalf of the local authorities [https://www.gov.pl/web/dyplomacja/informacje-dla-podrozujacych].**Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 for failing to follow sanitary rules. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    18.08.2020
  • Poland The Polish government wants to extend its ban on international flights to August 25, with 45 countries on the banned list. The list includes: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Saint Thomas and Prince, Russia, Brazil, Andorra, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Swaziland, Mexico, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Gabon, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Colombia, Kosovo, Costa Rica, Macedonia, Maldives, Moldova, Panama, Peru, South Africa, El Salvador, Serbia, Singapore, Suriname, Cape Verde, Romania, United States, Oman, Luxembourg, Bolivia, Bahamas.(The First News, 08.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions. **Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. Entry checks remain in place on land borders with Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. International flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended.More info: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. You must wear a mask at all times in enclosed spaces, on public transport, in taxis or in an open space where you are unable to maintain a 1.5 meter distance. Police and sanitary inspectors are entitled to issue you with an on-the-spot fine (approximately PLN500/£100) if you are found not to be wearing a mask when you should. Further prosecution could result in a fine of up to PLN 30,000 (£6,000) for failing to follow sanitary rules.
    There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis.
    Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Most museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50%. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    13.08.2020
  • Poland The Polish government wants to extend its ban on international flights to August 25, with 45 countries on the banned list. The list includes: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Saint Thomas and Prince, Russia, Brazil, Andorra, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Swaziland, Mexico, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Gabon, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Colombia, Kosovo, Costa Rica, Macedonia, Maldives, Moldova, Panama, Peru, South Africa, El Salvador, Serbia, Singapore, Suriname, Cape Verde, Romania, United States, Oman, Luxembourg, Bolivia, Bahamas.(The First News, 08.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions.**Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended. More info: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 1.5 metre distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 1.5 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. In some areas with high infection rates the limits may be much lower and in some cases, events may be cancelled at short notice. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. You can still use taxis. Masks must be worn. There are fines between 5000 to 30000 PLN if you are found breaking these rules. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open; masks must be worn. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50% and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. The above national measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. In high infection rate areas, local restrictions may be put in place at short notice resulting in further reductions in numbers of people permitted to enter a venue, or in some cases complete closure. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    10.08.2020
  • Poland The Polish government wants to extend its ban on international flights to August 25, with 45 countries on the banned list. The list includes: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Saint Thomas and Prince, Russia, Brazil, Andorra, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Swaziland, Mexico, Israel, Qatar, Kuwait, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chile, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Gabon, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Colombia, Kosovo, Costa Rica, Macedonia, Maldives, Moldova, Panama, Peru, South Africa, El Salvador, Serbia, Singapore, Suriname, Cape Verde, Romania, United States, Oman, Luxembourg, Bolivia, Bahamas.(The First News, 08.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions.**Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended. More info: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the countr is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between 5000 to 30000 PLN. if you are found breaking these rules. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50% and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    08.08.2020
  • Poland Government extends partial ban on international flights to 11 August (The First News, 29.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: Travelling to and from EU countries is allowed without restrictions. Travelling to and from Norway, Switzerland, Iceland and Liechtenstein, as well as Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino, is allowed without restrictions.**Rules and Exceptions: EU’s internal borders are open, while country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. international flights from airports located on the territory of a member state of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area, Switzerland or a member state of the European Union, except for Great Britain, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Portugal have been resumed. International rail traffic has been restored within the internal borders of the European Union. However, traveling by international trains to destinations outside the EU’s external borders is still suspended. More info: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: Coronavirus: information and recommendations [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Free movement throughout the countr is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between 5000 to 30000 PLN. if you are found breaking these rules. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and use the hand sanitiser provided for customers. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50% and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    07.08.2020
  • Poland Government extends partial ban on international flights to 11 August (The First News, 29.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: As of 13/6/20, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required. More info: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel]
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between £1000 to £6000 (5000 to 30000 PLN) if you are found breaking these rules.The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.

    Read more
    03.08.2020
  • Poland Government extends partial ban on international flights to 11 August (The First News, 29.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **From within the EU: As of 13/6/20, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required.
    **Transit Travellers: As above.
    **From Third Countries: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay. Further information is available at: [https://www.gov.pl/web/coronavirus/travel].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between £1000 to £6000 (5000 to 30000 PLN) if you are found breaking these rules.The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.

    Read more
    30.07.2020
  • Poland Government extends ban on international flights to 28 July (The First News, 15.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Land border controls with EU Schengen countries have now been lifted and there are no border checks and no quarantine requirements for those entering Poland from another EU/EFTA Schengen country. If you travel to Poland from a non-Schengen EU country (Republic of Ireland, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia or Cyprus), or from the UK until the end of the transition period, you will need to go through passport control but will not need to go into quarantine. Checks remain in place if you enter Poland from a non-EU country. This includes by land from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, or by air. Poland now allows direct flights into its territory from a select number of non-EU countries. This list could change at short notice: Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom or Ukraine. By air or by land, you will only be allowed to cross into Poland from a non-EU / EFTA country if you are: a Polish national; a spouse, child or individual under the permanent care of a Polish national; a holder of a Pole’s Card; a holder of the right to permanent or temporary stay in Poland or a work permit holder; a foreign national driving a means of transport used for transporting goods or people; a freight driver driving to or from a rest break in a vehicle not used for transporting goods; a diplomat, consular staff member, representative of an international organisation or a member of their family; a school pupil or student studying in Poland; a European Economic Area, Swiss or UK national or a member of their family transiting Poland to your permanent residence.
    If you are travelling to Poland by air from a non-EU/EFTA country you will likely need to demonstrate to check-in staff that you meet one of the above requirements. If you have only limited or non-official documentation you might wish to arrive at check-in in good time as there may be delays while airline staff verify your right to travel with Polish authorities. If you cannot demonstrate that you meet one of these requirements the airline might not allow you to fly.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between £1000 to £6000 (5000 to 30000 PLN) if you are found breaking these rules.The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.

    Read more
    24.07.2020
  • Poland Government extends ban on international flights to 28 July (The First News, 15.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Land border controls with EU Schengen countries have now been lifted and there are no border checks and no quarantine requirements for those entering Poland from another EU/EFTA Schengen country. If you travel to Poland from a non-Schengen EU country (Republic of Ireland, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia or Cyprus), or from the UK until the end of the transition period, you will need to go through passport control but will not need to go into quarantine. British citizen passport holders do not need a visa to enter Poland or any other EU/EFTA country. Checks remain in place if you enter Poland from a non-EU country. This includes by land from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, or by air. Poland now allows direct flights into its territory from a select number of non-EU countries. This list could change at short notice:Montenegro; Ukraine; Georgia; Japan; Canada; Albania; and South Korea. By air or by land, you will only be allowed to cross into Poland from a non-EU / EFTA country if you are: a Polish national; a spouse, child or individual under the permanent care of a Polish national; a holder of a Pole’s Card; a holder of the right to permanent or temporary stay in Poland or a work permit holder; a foreign national driving a means of transport used for transporting goods or people; a freight driver driving to or from a rest break in a vehicle not used for transporting goods;
    a diplomat, consular staff member, representative of an international organisation or a member of their family; a school pupil or student studying in Poland; a European Economic Area, Swiss or UK national or a member of their family transiting Poland to your permanent residence.If you are travelling to Poland by air from a non-EU/EFTA country you will likely need to demonstrate to check-in staff that you meet one of the above requirements. If you have only limited or non-official documentation you might wish to arrive at check-in in good time as there may be delays while airline staff verify your right to travel with Polish authorities. If you cannot demonstrate that you meet one of these requirements the airline might not allow you to fly.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person.
    There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between £1000 to £6000 (5000 to 30000 PLN) if you are found breaking these rules.The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice.

    Read more
    17.07.2020
  • Poland Government extends ban on international flights to 28 July (The First News, 15.07.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    From EU: As of 13 June, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required.
    Transit: As of 13 June, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required.
    Third Country Nationals: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods;
    citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay;
    foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement throughout the country is allowed. Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others. Children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, you should keep a 2 metre distance from others, unless you are a parent with a child under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June you are allowed to organise wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people. Outdoor concerts and events are allowed with limits on numbers attending. Public transport use is operating with reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Masks must be worn. You can still use taxis. There are fines between 5000 to 30000 PLN if you are found breaking these rules. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. If you plan to visit a cultural or sports venue we recommend first consulting their website for information about opening. Many have information in English as well as Polish. National Forests, parks and beaches are open. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops but you must cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but you must wear a mask when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. Cinemas, theatres and concert halls are open with capacity limited to 50% and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also open, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    15.07.2020
  • Poland Border between countries Poland and Czechia to be fully reopened on 30 June (The First News, 30.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    From EU: As of 13 June, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required.
    Transit: As of 13 June, Poland has restored full border traffic within the internal borders of the European Union, and travellers have regained the right to free entry, exit and transit through the territory of the Republic of Poland. No quarantine is required.
    Third Country Nationals: Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card; diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods;
    citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay;
    foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.
    Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    13.07.2020
  • Poland Border between countries Poland and Czechia to be fully reopened on 30 June (The First News, 30.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    European Union citizens are eligible to enter Poland without any obstacles. Services present at the border will carry out random checks. No mandatory quarantine is imposed on EU citizens entering the territory of the Republic of Poland.
    External borders remain closed. The reopening of external borders will depend on the recommendations of the European Commission.
    Country’s borders that are also the EU’s external borders, remain closed. They may be crossed only by: Polish citizens; foreigners who are spouses or children of citizens of the Republic of Poland or remain under the constant care of citizens of the Republic of Poland; holders of a Polish identity Card;
    diplomats; people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in the Republic of Poland or a work permit; in particularly justified cases, the commander of the Border Guard post, after obtaining the consent of the Commander-in-Chief of the Border Guard, may allow a foreigner to enter the territory of the Republic of Poland in accordance with the procedure specified in the Act of 12 December 2013 on foreigners (Journal of Laws of 2020, item 35); foreigners who run a means of transport designed for the transport of goods; citizens of European Union Member States, European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) Member States – parties to the Agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when traveling through the territory of the Republic of Poland to their place of residence or stay; foreigners with a permanent residence permit or a long-term resident’s European Union residence permit, in the territory of other European Union Member States, a Member State of the European Free Trade Agreement (EFTA) – parties to the agreement on the European Economic Area or Switzerland and their spouses and children, when travelling through the territory of the Republic of Poland, to their place of residence or stay.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.
    Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    07.07.2020
  • Poland Border between countries Poland and Czechia to be fully reopened on 30 June (The First News, 30.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    European Union citizens are eligible to enter Poland without any obstacles. Services present at the border will carry out random checks. No mandatory quarantine is imposed on EU citizens entering the territory of the Republic of Poland.
    External borders remain closed. The reopening of external borders will depend on the recommendations of the European Commission.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.
    Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules.

    Read more
    02.07.2020
  • Poland Border between countries Poland and Czechia to be fully reopened on 30 June (The First News, 30.06.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    European Union citizens are eligible to enter Poland without any obstacles. Services present at the border will carry out random checks. No mandatory quarantine is imposed on EU citizens entering the territory of the Republic of Poland.
    External borders remain closed. The reopening of external borders will depend on the recommendations of the European Commission.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.

    Read more
    01.07.2020
  • Poland Government reopens airports for international passenger flights within EU, apart from the United Kingdom, Sweden and Portugal. Humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights are also allowed to enter.
    Other international flights remain suspended until 30 June.

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Border controls with EU countries have now been lifted and there are no border checks and no quarantine requirements for those entering Poland from another EU/EFTA country. At the land borders with Russia, Ukraine and Belarus checks remain in place.
    International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 30 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    ***

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.

    Read more
    26.06.2020
  • Poland Flights to Poland are suspended until 30 June 2020.
    – This does not apply to flights arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain or Switzerland.
    – This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.

    Government reopens airports for international passenger flights within EU, apart from the United Kingdom, Sweden and Portugal. Other international flights remain suspended until 30 June.

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 30 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 30 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    ***

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.

    Read more
    22.06.2020
  • Poland Government reopens airports for international passenger flights within EU, apart from the United Kingdom, Sweden and Portugal. Other international flights remain suspended until 30 June.

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 30 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 30 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    ***

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.

    Read more
    17.06.2020
  • Poland Government reopens airports for international passenger flights within EU (Xinhau, 16.06.2020).
    1. Flights to Poland are suspended.
    – This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.
    2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    ***

    Internal restrictions:

    Masks are no longer compulsory in open public spaces if you are able to maintain 2m distance from others and children under 4 are not required to wear masks. When outside, a 2 metre distance from others should be kept, excempt a parents with children under 13 or the carer of a disabled person. There are no longer restrictions on the number of people attending religious services and funerals. The government has announced that from 6 June wedding receptions and other family celebrations for up to 150 people can be held. Public transport use is limited to reduced capacity seating to maintain appropriate distance between passengers. Taxis can be used. Masks must be worn. There are fines of between PLN 5000 to PLN 30000 PLN for those infringing rules. Hotels and short term accommodation establishments are open subject to strict sanitary rules and some facilities may be closed (for example swimming pools). The government has announced that hotels will be able to reopen swimming pools, gyms and saunas on 6 June, with strict hygiene measures in place. Some sporting facilities are open with limits on visitor numbers. There are no limits on customer numbers in shops, but you still have to cover your nose and mouth and wear single-use gloves. Restaurants and pubs are permitted to open but masks must be worn when not seated at the table. Hairdressers may also open by appointment only. Some museums, libraries and cultural venues are open. The government has announced that from 6 June cinemas, theatres and concert halls may open at 50% capacity and masks must be worn. Swimming pools, gyms, indoor play centres and theme parks, saunas, tanning salons, massage salons and tattoo parlours are also allowed to open from 6 June, with strict hygiene rules in place. Masks must be worn at massage salons and tattoo parlours. Some nurseries and kindergartens are open subject to strict sanitary procedures. A staged relaxation of the rules for students began on 18 May, including allowing classes and childcare for Grades 1-3 of primary schools (6 to 9 year olds). Higher Education Institutions may be open for some classes. If you are a student or parent you should consult your education provider for more information. The above measures may be extended further, in scope and time, at short notice. The Office for Foreigners allows in-person appointments but you must adhere to strict social distancing guidelines and wear a mask.

    Read more
    16.06.2020
  • Poland The suspension of international passenger air travel has been extended to at least June 16. (Reuters, 06.06.2020)
    1. Flights to Poland are suspended.
    – This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.
    2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.

    I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable.
    Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed.
    Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals).
    Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters.
    Restrictions:
    people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian;
    parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed;
    hotels and accommodations are closed;
    the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people;
    people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine;
    ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines.
    Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Some additional businesses were permitted to reopen starting May 18, with proper sanitation and social distancing systems in place, including hairdressers, cosmetic salons, restaurants, bars, and sports facilities. Restrictions on the number of passengers on local public transportation were also eased. From May 25, elementary schools can open for childcare and high schoolers may return. On June 1, all school children may return for in-person consultations.

    Read more
    06.06.2020
  • Poland The suspension of international passenger air travel has been extended to at least June 6.
    Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020)

    1. Flights to Poland are suspended.
    – This does not apply to humanitarian, medevac and repatriation flights.
    2. Passengers are subject to quarantine for 14 days.

    I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 12 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable.
    Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed.
    Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals).
    Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters.
    Restrictions:
    people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian;
    parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed;
    hotels and accommodations are closed;
    the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people;
    people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine;
    ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines.
    Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Some additional businesses were permitted to reopen starting May 18, with proper sanitation and social distancing systems in place, including hairdressers, cosmetic salons, restaurants, bars, and sports facilities. Restrictions on the number of passengers on local public transportation were also eased. From May 25, elementary schools can open for childcare and high schoolers may return. On June 1, all school children may return for in-person consultations.

    Read more
    04.06.2020
  • Poland The suspension of international passenger air travel has been extended to at least June 6.
    Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020)

    I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 12 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable.
    Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed.
    Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals).
    Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters.
    Restrictions:
    people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian;
    parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed;
    hotels and accommodations are closed;
    the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people;
    people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine;
    ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines.
    Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Some additional businesses were permitted to reopen starting May 18, with proper sanitation and social distancing systems in place, including hairdressers, cosmetic salons, restaurants, bars, and sports facilities. Restrictions on the number of passengers on local public transportation were also eased. From May 25, elementary schools can open for childcare and high schoolers may return. On June 1, all school children may return for in-person consultations.

    Read more
    01.06.2020
  • Poland The suspension of international passenger air travel has been extended to at least June 6. Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020) I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 12 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Some additional businesses were permitted to reopen starting May 18, with proper sanitation and social distancing systems in place, including hairdressers, cosmetic salons, restaurants, bars, and sports facilities. Restrictions on the number of passengers on local public transportation were also eased. From May 25, elementary schools can open for childcare and high schoolers may return. On June 1, all school children may return for in-person consultations.

    Read more
    27.05.2020
  • Poland Poland to extend ban on international flights until June 6 (Reuters, 22.05.2020) Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020) I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Read more
    23.05.2020
  • Poland Poland to extend ban on international flights until June 6 (Reuters, 22.05.2020) Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020) I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Read more
    22.05.2020
  • Poland Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020) I

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for work or education related activities. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended until 31 May and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a facemask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Read more
    21.05.2020
  • Poland Government may reopen borders 15 June, lift remaining COVID-19 restrictions 1 July (Reuters, 19.05.2020)

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 15 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 15 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Read more
    19.05.2020
  • Poland

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed until 12 June and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended also until at least 12 June. Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes. Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. People under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Read more
    18.05.2020
  • Poland Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 12 June.
    Most foreign nationals are barred from entering the country at least until 12 June. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes.
    Arriving diplomats, transiting truck drivers and residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries no longer need to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Read more
    14.05.2020
  • Poland Poland to keep borders closed for foreigners until June 12 (Reuters, 13.05.2020) Poland has extended its air traffic ban until May 23. The ban covers both domestic and international flights. (The First News, 11.05.2020). Flights to Poland are suspended. – This does not apply to flights with status HOSP, HUM, HEAD and other flights performed to save people’s lives or health, flights to protect public order, emergency flights, flights at the order of the Prime Minister, flights performed by foreign air carriers at the order of foreign states to bring back their nationals. – This does not apply to domestic aircraft with up to 15 seats.

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 25 May. Foreign nationals are barred from entering the country until 13 May. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. From 4 May residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries will no longer be required to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes. Lockdown measures are starting to be lifted. After lifting of restrictions on some shops, other businesses, including hotels, museums, and shopping centres, began reopening on 4 May.

    Source: https://pandemic.internationalsos.com/2019-ncov/ncov-travel-restrictions-flight-operations-and-screening https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm https://pl.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/

    Read more
    13.05.2020
  • Poland Poland has extended its air traffic ban until May 23. The ban covers both domestic and international flights. (The First News, 11.05.2020). Flights to Poland are suspended. – This does not apply to flights with status HOSP, HUM, HEAD and other flights performed to save people’s lives or health, flights to protect public order, emergency flights, flights at the order of the Prime Minister, flights performed by foreign air carriers at the order of foreign states to bring back their nationals. – This does not apply to domestic aircraft with up to 15 seats.

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings for the coming weeks. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 25 May. Foreign nationals are barred from entering the country until 13 May. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number. From 4 May residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries will no longer be required to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes. Lockdown measures are starting to be lifted. After lifting of restrictions on some shops, other businesses, including hotels, museums, and shopping centres, began reopening on 4 May.

    Source: https://pandemic.internationalsos.com/2019-ncov/ncov-travel-restrictions-flight-operations-and-screening https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm https://pl.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/

    Published on 11.05.2020

    Read more
    12.05.2020
  • Poland

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 13 May. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 9 May.

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 13 May. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 9 May.
    Foreign nationals are barred from entering the country until 13 May. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.
    From 4 May residents who regularly cross the border for working or studying in neighbouring countries will no longer be required to quarantine upon return to Poland.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable.
    Secondary schools and universities are closed until 24 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed.
    Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals).
    Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters.
    Restrictions:
    people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian;
    parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed;
    hotels and accommodations are closed;
    the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people;
    people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine;
    ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines.
    Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    The quarantine rules no longer apply to people crossing the border with; Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Lithuania, Slovakia and Sweden. However, they must prove to the Border Guard Officers that their travel is for essential purposes.
    Lockdown measures are starting to be lifted. After lifting of restrictions on some shops, other businesses, including hotels, museums, and shopping centres, began reopening on 4 May.

    Read more
    10.05.2020
  • Poland Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 3 May. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 9 May. Flights to Poland are suspended. – This does not apply to flights with status HOSP, HUM, HEAD and other flights performed to save people’s lives or health, flights to protect public order, emergency flights, flights at the order of the Prime Minister, flights performed by foreign air carriers at the order of foreign states to bring back their nationals. – This does not apply to domestic aircraft with up to 15 seats.

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 3 May. International rail and air transport are suspended until further notice. Foreign nationals are barred from entering the country until 3 May. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 3 May.

     

    Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Lockdown measures are starting to be lifted. This will start with the lifting of restrictions on shops, while other aspects of the lockdown will be considered as they examine the impact of their strategy.

    Read more
    06.05.2020
  • Poland Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 3 May. International rail is suspended until further notice; air traffic is suspended until at least 9 May. Flights to Poland are suspended. – This does not apply to flights with status HOSP, HUM, HEAD and other flights performed to save people’s lives or health, flights to protect public order, emergency flights, flights at the order of the Prime Minister, flights performed by foreign air carriers at the order of foreign states to bring back their nationals. – This does not apply to domestic aircraft with up to 15 seats.

    International restrictions:

    Borders are closed and stringent checks have been imposed at all border crossings until at least 3 May. International rail and air transport are suspended until further notice. Foreign nationals are barred from entering the country until 3 May. Citizens and foreigners with residency permits are allowed to return from abroad but will be required to quarantine for 14 days. They are required to provide the local authorities with information about their place of stay or address and a contact telephone number.

    Internal restrictions:

    Domestic flights are suspended and national rail routes are operating a reduced timetable. Secondary schools and universities are closed until 3 May. Cinemas, operas, theatres, museums and other cultural venues are closed until further notice. Shopping malls are still operating but with reduced services. Grocery shops, pharmacies and banks remain open. Restaurants, pubs, night clubs and casinos are closed. Gatherings of more than two people are prohibited (a maximum of five for Holy Mass and funerals). Public transport is limited to 50% of available seating to maintain appropriate distance between commuters. Restrictions: people under 18 must not leave the house without a parent or guardian; parks, boulevards and beaches remain closed; hotels and accommodations are closed; the number of people in stores and the post office is restricted to two-three people; people living with someone quarantined because they have returned from abroad of have been in contact with an infected person must also self-quarantine; ·violating these orders is a criminal offence subject to fines. Wearing a face mask or scarf in public is compulsory; those who do not comply will face heavy fines.

    Relaxation of restrictions:

    Lockdown measures are starting to be lifted. This will start with the lifting of restrictions on shops, while other aspects of the lockdown will be considered as they examine the impact of their strategy.

    Read more
    29.04.2020
  • Source US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    Re-open Europe/
    Polish Government/
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