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Airlines Updates

20.10.2020 China Eastern and Shanghai Airlines in the last few weeks gradually filed planned International operation, scheduled from 25OCT20 to 31DEC20. Planned operation as of 19OCT20 as follows. Various travel restrictions and CAAC’s latest policies continue to impact the airline’s operation, which may lead to additional last minute changes, including additional routes/frequencies restoration.

China Eastern
Hangzhou – Sydney 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Kunming – Dhaka 2 weekly 737
Kunming – Phnom Penh 1 weekly 737
Kunming – Vientiane 2 weekly 737
Nanjing – Vancouver 1 weekly A350-900XWB (A330-200 from 17NOV20)
Shanghai Pu Dong – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Auckland 2 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly A320
Shanghai Pu Dong – Colombo 1 weekly A330-200
Shanghai Pu Dong – Frankfurt 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Manila 1 weekly A330-200
Shanghai Pu Dong – New York JFK 2 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Paris CDG 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Phnom Penh 1 weekly A321
Shanghai Pu Dong – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330-200
Shanghai Pu Dong – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Sydney 1 weekly 777-300ER (2 weekly form 12NOV20)
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Toronto 1 weekly 777-300ER
Xi’An – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300

Shanghai Airlines
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly 737-800
Shanghai Pu Dong – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly 787-9

Air China and Shenzhen Airlines during the month of November 2020 schedules following International routes. As of 19OCT20, planned operations as follow. Various travel restriction as well as CAAC’s current International flights policy continue to impact the airline’s operation, which may lead to additional changes.

Air China
Beijing Capital – Athens 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Bangkok 1 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Copenhagen 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Delhi 1 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Dubai 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Frankfurt 1 weekly A350-900XWB (outbound only)
Beijing Capital – Delhi 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Islamabad – Karachi – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Los Angeles 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Madrid 2 weekly A330-200/747-400
Beijing Capital – Minsk 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Paris CDG 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Phnom Penh 2 weekly A321
Beijing Capital – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Shenzhen – Johannesburg 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Stockholm Arlanda 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Vancouver 2 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Vienna 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Warsaw 2 weekly A330
Beijing Capital – Yangon 1 weekly 737-800
Chengdu – Frankfurt 1 weekly A330-200
Chengdu – Kathmandu 1 weekly A319
Chengdu – Singapore 1 weekly A320
Hangzhou – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330
Hangzhou – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330
Shanghai Pu Dong – Frankfurt 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300
Shenzhen – Los Angeles 1 weekly 777-300ER

Shenzhen Airlines
Shenzhen – Bangkok 1 weekly 737-800
Shenzhen – Phnom Penh 1 weekly A320
Shenzhen – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly 737-800
Shenzhen – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330

Published on 14.10.2020
China Southern resumes Changsha – Nairobi service from mid-Oct 2020

Published on 06.10.2020
Air China adds ARJ21-700 service to Hohhot from late-Oct 2020

Published on 01.10.2020
Air China resumes round-trip Shenzhen – Los Angeles flight from late-Sep 2020
Shenzhen Airlines resumes Shenzhen – Phnom Penh from late-Sep 2020
Juneyao Airlines W20 Helsinki operations as of 30SEP20

29.09.2020 China Southern this week adjusted planned International operation for Northern winter 2020/21 season, from 25OCT20 to 27MAR21. The new International schedule will continue to see the airline operates reduced schedule, largely identical to Northern summer season.

Planned operation as of 26SEP20 as follows. Additional changes remain possible.

Guangzhou – Amsterdam 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Auckland 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Bangkok 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Dhaka 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Ho Chi Minh City 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Jakarta 1 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Kathmandu 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Kuala Lumpur 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – London Heathrow 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Los Angeles 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Manila 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Paris CDG 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Phnom Penh 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Sydney 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Vancouver 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Vientiane 1 weekly A319
Shenyang – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly 787-9
Shenyang – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 787-9

Published on 26.09.2020
China Southern NW20 International operations as of 26SEP20

15.09.2020 Hainan Airlines starting this week is adjusting operational routing on Beijing Capital – Toronto route. From 15SEP20 to 24OCT20, 1 of 2 weekly flights will operate nonstop in both directions, while 2nd weekly flight will continue to operate as Beijing Capital – Toronto – Xi’An – Beijing Capital. Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner operates these flights.

HU7975 PEK1425 – 1515YYZ 789 26
HU7976 YYZ1720 – 1900+1PEK 789 3
HU7976 YYZ1720 – 2135+1XIY0335+2 – 0550+2PEK 789 7

11.09.2020 Air Macau earlier this week filed planned operation for October 2020, which sees the airline restores 9 routes to Mainland China from late-September 2020. Planned operation for the period of 23SEP20 – 24OCT20 as follows.

Additional changes remain possible.

Macau – Beijing Capital eff 30SEP20 Increase from 4 to 7 weekly
Macau – Changzhou eff 30SEP20 Increase from 2 to 4 weekly
Macau – Chengdu eff 30SEP20 Increase from 3 to 7 weekly
Macau – Chongqing eff 24SEP20 2 weekly (5 weekly from 30SEP20, 4 weekly from 12OCT20)
Macau – Guiyang eff 26SEP20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 30SEP20)
Macau – Hangzhou eff 30SEP20 Increase from 3 to 7 weekly
Macau – Nanjing eff 30SEP20 Increase from 2 to 7 weekly
Macau – Nanning eff 30SEP20 Increase from 2 to 3 weekly
Macau – Ningbo eff 26SEP20 2 weekly (1 daily from 30SEP20, 5 weekly from 12OCT20)
Macau – Qingdao eff 23SEP20 2 weekly (3 weekly from 30SEP20)
Macau – Shantou (Jieyang/Chaoshan) eff 23SEP20 3 weekly (4 weekly 30SEP20 – 11SEP20)
Macau – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 30SEP20 Increase from 4 to 14 weekly
Macau – Taipei Taoyuan 11 weekly (Increase from 10. From Macau, passenger traffic rights restricts to 7 weekly)
Macau – Taiyuan eff 25SEP20 2 weekly (5 weekly from 30SEP20)
Macau – Tianjin eff 23SEP20 2 weekly (1 daily from 30SEP20, 4 weekly from 12OCT20)
Macau – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly (No passenger traffic rights from Macau)
Macau – Wenzhou eff 24SEP20 2 weekly (1 daily from 30SEP20, 5 weekly from 12OCT20)
Macau – Xiamen eff 30SEP20 Increase from 4 to 7 weekly
Macau – Zhengzhou eff 26SEP20 2 weekly (4 weekly from 30SEP20, 3 weekly from 12OCT20)

Published on 04.09.2020
China Southern NW20 Sydney inventory changes as of 03SEP20

03.09.2020 Air China starting today (03SEP20) further revises International service for flights to Beijing, as the CAAC lifts mandatory quarantine points on flights departing from certain countries to Beijing, including Thailand, Cambodia, Pakistan, Greece, Denmark, Austria, Sweden and Canada. The CAAC issued the statement on lifting quarantine points on 02SEP20.

Air China will gradually resume nonstop service on both directions for following routes during the first half of September. Effective date listed below is based on foreign departure airport.

Beijing – Athens eff 06SEP20 1 weekly (Previous inbound quarantine point via Shijiazhuang)
Beijing – Bangkok eff 09SEP20 1 weekly (Previous inbound quarantine point via Qingdao)
Beijing – Copenhagen eff 08SEP20 1 weekly (previous inbound quarantine point via Shijiazhuang)
Beijing – Phnom Penh eff 03SEP20 1 weekly (Previous inbound quarantine point via Zhengzhou)
Beijing – Stockholm Arlanda eff 12SEP20 1 weekly (Previous inbound quarantine point via Tianjin)
Beijing – Vancouver eff 13SEP20 1 weekly (Previously inbound quarantine point via Hohhot)
Beijing – Vienna eff 14SEP20 1 weekly (Previous inbound quarantine point via Shenyang)

Published on 02.09.2020
September 2020 Boeing 747 Scheduled Passenger operations as of 30AUG20

Published on 28.08.2020
China Southern resumes Shanghai – Taipei service in Sep 2020

Published on 26.08.2020
Juneyao Airlines Sep 2020 International operations as of 25AUG20
Spring Airlines Japan W20 operations as of 25AUG20

26.08.2020
China Southern during the month of September and October 2020 continues to operate limited scheduled International service. As of 23AUG20, planned operation (excluding charter flights) for the period of 01SEP20 – 24OCT20 as follows.

Additional changes remain possible.

Guangzhou – Amsterdam 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Auckland 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Bangkok 2 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Dhaka 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Kathmandu 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Kuala Lumpur 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – London Heathrow 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Los Angeles 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Manila eff 24SEP20 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Paris CDG 2 weekly A350/380
Guangzhou – Phnom Penh 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Sydney 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Vancouver 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Vientiane 1 weekly 737-800
Guangzhou – Yangon 2 weekly A330
Shenyang – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330
Shenyang – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330
Urumqi – Islamabad eff 05OCT20 1 weekly 737-800

China Southern since last week added Airbus A380 aircraft service to Korea, operating Guangzhou – Seoul Incheon route. From 20AUG20 to 24OCT20, Airbus A380 operates this route once weekly.

CZ337 CAN0935 – 1355ICN 380 4
CZ338 ICN1655 – 1935CAN 380 4

China Eastern Airlines during the month of September 2020 continues to operate limited International service, pending on various travel restrictions that may affect the airline’s passenger traffic rights. Planned operation as of 25AUG20, including flights by Shanghai Airlines, as follows.

Hangzhou – Sydney 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Kunming – Dhaka 1 weekly 737
Kunming – Vientiane 1 weekly 737
Kunming – Yangon 1 weekly 787-9
Nanjing – Vancouver 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Shanghai Pu Dong – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Auckland 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly A320
Shanghai Pu Dong – Colombo 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Delhi 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Manila 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – New York JFK 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Paris CDG 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Phnom Penh 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Toronto 1 weekly 777-300ER
Xi’An – Singapore 1 weekly A320
Xi’An – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300

Shanghai Airlines
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly 737-800
Shanghai Pu Dong – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly 787-9

Sichuan Airlines for the remainder of summer 2020 season continues to operate limited International service. For the month of September 2020, the airline will resume service to Bangkok. Planned operation for the period of 01SEP20 – 24OCT20 as follows. Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation, including passenger traffic rights.

Chengdu – Bangkok eff 09SEP20 1 weekly A320
Chengdu – Cairo 1 weekly A330-200
Chengdu – Chiang Rai 1 weekly A321
Chengdu – Vancouver 1 weekly A350-900XWB

Air China recently adjusted planned International operation for the remainder of Northern summer season. As of 25AUG20, planned operation for the period of 01SEP20 – 24OCT20 as follows.

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation, including quarantine point on inbound flights to Beijing.

Beijing Capital – Athens – Chengdu – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Athens – Shijiazhuang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Copenhagen – Shijiazhuang – Beijing Capital 2 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Delhi – Taiyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Dubai – Xi’An – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Islamabad – Xi’An – Beijing Capital A330-200 operates every 14 days
Beijing Capital – Karachi – Xi’An – Beijing Capital A330-200 operates every 14 days
Beijing Capital – Los Angeles – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Madrid – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 747-400
Beijing Capital – Madrid – Xi’An – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 747-400
Beijing Capital – Manila – Qingdao – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200 (Current schedule lists Manila nonstop to Beijing on/after 08SEP20)
Beijing Capital – Minsk – Hohhet – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Moscow Sheremetyevo 1 weekly 777-300ER. From Moscow, service operates via following points (specified date based on Moscow departure)
Lanzhou: 04SEP20, 02OCT20
Nanjing: 11SEP20, 09OCT20
Shijiazhuang: 25SEP20, 23OCT20
Zhengzhou: 18SEP20, 16OCT20

Beijing Capital – Paris CDG – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 737-800
Beijing Capital – Phnom Penh – Zhengzhou – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A321
Beijing Capital – Stockholm Arlanda – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Stockholm Arlanda – Xi’An – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Vancouver – Shenyang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Vienna – Hohhet – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Warsaw – Taiyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Yangon – Zhengzhou 2 weekly 737-800
Chengdu – Frankfurt 1 weekly A330-200
Chengdu – Kathmandu 1 weekly A330-200
Chengdu – Singapore 1 weekly A330-300
Hangzhou – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330-200
Hangzhou – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-200
Shanghai Pu Dong – Frankfurt 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300

Separately, Shenzhen Airlines will operate 1 weekly Shenzhen – Tokyo Narita with A330-200 for the remainder of Summer season.

Published on 25.08.2020
China Southern adds ARJ21-700 service to Zhanjiang from late-August 2020

25/08/2020 China Airlines since last week gradually filed planned operation for the month of September 2020. As of 21AUG20, planned operation as follows. Various travel restrictions affecting the airline’s passenger traffic rights on certain sectors and days.

Kaohsiung – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly
Kaohsiung – Xiamen 1 weekly (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Song Shan – Shanghai Pu Dong 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Amsterdam 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Auckland 1 flight scheduled from TPE on 22SEP20
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Brisbane Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Chengdu 1 weekly (2 weekly from 27SEP20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Frankfurt 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Fukuoka 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Hanoi 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Ho Chi Minh City 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Hong Kong 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Jakarta 1 daily
Taipei Taoyuan – Kuala Lumpur 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 5 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Melbourne Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Nagoya Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – New York JFK Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Osaka Kansai 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Phnom Penh 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Seoul Incheon 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Singapore 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Sydney Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Vancouver 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Xiamen 2 weekly (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Taoyuan – Yangon 2 weekly

Air Macau this week filed planned operation for the month of September 2020. As of 20AUG20, planned operation as follows. Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation, as well as passenger traffic rights on certain direction.

Macau – Beijing Capital 4 weekly
Macau – Changzhou 2 weekly
Macau – Chengdu 3 weekly
Macau – Hangzhou 3 weekly
Macau – Jieyang/Chaoshan (Shantou) 3 weekly
Macau – Nanjing 2 weekly
Macau – Nanning 2 weekly
Macau – Seoul Incheon Service operates on 04SEP20, 14SEP20, 25SEP20
Macau – Shanghai Pu Dong 4 weekly
Macau – Taipei Taoyuan 10 weekly
Macau – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly
Macau – Xiamen 4 weekly

Published on 24.08.2020
China Southern adds A380 Seoul service August – October 2020
China Eastern Nanjing – Vancouver Aug – Oct 2020 aircraft changes

20.08.2020 Air China in recent schedule update filed preliminary long-haul changes for Northern winter 2020/21 season, from 25OCT20 to 27MAR21. As of 19AUG20, the Star Alliance carrier’s International service remains unavailable for reservation in the GDS, however the airline has filed changes in timetable listing.

Further changes will be filed in the next few weeks.

Beijing Capital – Frankfurt Reduce from 2 to 1 daily, CA931/932 operated by 747-8I
Beijing Capital – London Heathrow Reduce from 17 to 7 weekly, CA937/938 operated by 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Los Angeles Reduce from 19 to 7 weekly, CA987/988 operated by 787-9
Beijing Capital – Newark 5 weekly 787-9 removed in NW20
Beijing Capital – New York JFK Reduce from 2 to 1 daily, CA981/982 operated by 747-8I
Beijing Capital – Paris CDG Reduce from 11 to 7 weekly, CA933/934 operated by 777-300ER
Chengdu – London Heathrow 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Chengdu – Paris CDG 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Chengdu – Sydney 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Chongqing – Dubai 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Hangzhou – Rome 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Shanghai Pu Dong – Barcelona 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 4 weekly A350-900XWB service maintained, replacing London Gatwick (London Gatwick operation suspended until late-March 2021)
Shanghai Pu Dong – Munich 3 weekly A350-900XWB in NW20
Shanghai Pu Dong – Paris CDG 4 weekly A330-200 in NW20
Shenzhen – Frankfurt 3 weekly A330-200 in NW20

Published on 17.08.2020
Air China resumes Shanghai – Taipei service in Sep 2020

Published on 14.08.2020
Qingdao Airlines adds Fuzhou – Tokyo service in Aug/Sep 2020

14.08.2020 Air China yesterday (13AUG20) resumed Chengdu – Frankfurt service, on board Airbus A330-200 aircraft. For the remainder of summer 2020 season, the airline operates this route once weekly on Thursdays.

CA431 CTU1235 – 1720FRA 330 4
CA432 FRA2000 – 1150+1CTU 330 4

Published on 06.08.2020
Air China resumes Hangzhou – Tokyo service from late-July 2020

Published on 05.08.2020
Air China resumes Hangzhou – Singapore service from late-July 2020

05.08.2020 China Airlines during the month of August 2020 plans to operate following International routes, based on data as of 03AUG20. Planned operation as follows. Note ongoing travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation, and passenger traffic rights on certain sectors.

Kaohsiung – Shanghai Pu Dong eff 13AUG20 1 weekly
Kaohsiung – Xiamen 1 weekly Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Song Shan – Shanghai Pu Dong 
2 weekly (3 weekly from 18AUG20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Amsterdam 
1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 
2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Brisbane Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Chengdu 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Frankfurt 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Hanoi 2 weekly (3 weekly from 19AUG20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Ho Chi Minh City 2 weekly (3 weekly from 20AUG20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Hong Kong 4 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Jakarta 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly (3 weekly from 13AUG20)
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 
2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 3 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Melbourne Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – New York JFK 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Phnom Penh 1 weekly (2 weekly from 13AUG20)
Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Seoul Incheon eff 21AUG20 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Singapore 2 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Sydney Service operates every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Vancouver 1 weekly
Taipei Taoyuan – Xiamen 1 weekly (Extra flight every 14 days, Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Taoyuan – Yangon 1 weekly

03.08.2020 Spring Airlines in August 2020 is resuming 2 International routes, with weekly flight scheduled from Changzhou and Xi’An. Planned operation as follows.

Changzhou – Osaka Kansai eff 06AUG20 1 weekly A320
9C6395 CZX1135 – 1425KIX 320 4
9C6396 KIX1555 – 1850CZX 320 4

Xi’An – Bangkok eff 02AUG20 1 weekly A320
9C6441 XIY1205 – 1550BKK 320 6
9C6442 BKK1650 – 2105XIY 320 6

The airline continues to operate following International and regional routes:
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly
Shanghai Pu Dong – Hong Kong 4 weekly (1 daily from 16AUG20)
Shanghai Pu Dong – Jeju 1 weekly
Shanghai Pu Dong – Phnom Penh 1 weekly
Shanghai Pu Dong – Taipei Taoyuan 5 weekly

31.07.2020 Juneyao Airlines in August 2020 resumes 2 International and regional routes, including Nanjing – Osaka and Shanghai – Hong Kong. Planned operation as follows.

Nanjing – Osaka Kansai eff 06AUG20 1 weekly 787-9 (A320 operates on 06AUG20)
HO1610 NKG1410 – 1730KIX 789 4
HO1609 KIX2010 – 2205NKG 789 4

Shanghai Pu Dong – Hong Kong eff 05AUG20 2 weekly A320
HO1305 PVG1905 – 2140HKG 320 36
HO1306 HKG2240 – 0115+1PVG 320 36

The airline’s other regional and International operation in August 2020 includes the following:
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Helsinki 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Kaohsiung 2 weekly A320
Shanghai Pu Dong – Osaka Kansai 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Taipei Taoyuan 5 weekly A321

China Eastern in August 2020 plans to operate 2 weekly flights to Sydney, with 1 weekly departure each from Hangzhou and Shanghai Pu Dong.

Hangzhou – Sydney 1 weekly A330-200
MU711 HGH1905 – 0740+1SYD 332 4
MU712 SYD1120 – 1955HGH 332 5

Shanghai Pu Dong – Sydney 1 weekly 777-300ER
MU561 PVG2020 – 0900+1SYD 773 D
MU562 SYD1100 – 1920PVG 773 D

Published on 28.07.2020
China Southern Aug – Oct 2020 International operations as of 24JUL20
China Eastern August 2020 International scheduled operations as of 24JUL20
Loong Air resumes scheduled International service from late-July 2020
Tianjin Airlines intends to resume Melbourne service from late-August 2020

28.07.2020 Air Macau earlier this month updated planned operation for August 2020. Ongoing development and travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation and passenger traffic rights on certain outbound flights. Planned operation as of 26JUL20 as follows.

Macau – Beijing Capital 1 weekly (2 weekly from 12AUG20, 4 weekly from 24AUG20)
Macau – Changzhou eff 12AUG20 2 weekly
Macau – Chengdu eff 12AUG20 2 weekly
Macau – Hangzhou 1 weekly (2 weekly from 12AUG20, 4 weekly from 24AUG20)
Macau – Nanjing eff 12AUG20 2 weekly
Macau – Nanning 1 weekly (2 weekly from 12AUG20)
Macau – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly
Macau – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly (4 weekly from 12AUG20, 1 daily from 24AUG20)
Macau – Shantou 3 weekly
Macau – Taipei Taoyuan 10 weekly
Macau – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly
Macau – Xiamen 1 weekly (4 weekly from 12AUG20)

Published on 24.07.2020
China Eastern resumes Xi’An – Tokyo service from late-July 2020

Loong Air (Zhejiang Loong Airlines) in late-July 2020 resumes scheduled International service, operating flights between Hangzhou and Japan, as well as Korea. Planned operation as follows.

Hangzhou – Osaka Kansai eff 25JUL20 1 weekly A320
Hangzhou – Seoul Incheon eff 23JUL20 1 weekly A320

China Eastern in August 2020 continues to operate reduced scheduled International service, including restoration of additional routes. Planned operation as of 24JUL20 for August remains subject to change, due to various travel restrictions as well as CAAC’s International flight policies.

Hangzhou – Sydney 1 weekly A330-200
Kunming – Vientiane 1 weekly 737
Kunming – Yangon 1 weekly 787-9
Nanjing – Vancouver 1 weekly A330-200
Shanghai Pu Dong – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Auckland 1 weekly 787-9
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly A320
Shanghai Pu Dong – Delhi 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Frankfurt 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Manila 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – New York JFK 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Paris CDG 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Phnom Penh 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Singapore 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Toronto 1 weekly 777-300ER
Xi’An – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300

Shanghai Airlines service
Shanghai Pu Dong – Bangkok 1 weekly 737-800
Shanghai Pu Dong – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly 737-800

China Southern Airlines has extended revised International schedule until the end of Northern summer 2020 season, as the airline continues to operate limited scheduled flights. Recent update sees selected frequency increase to Amsterdam, Auckland, Kuala Lumpur, Sydney, Vancouver, and Yangon.

As of 24JUL20, planned 01AUG20 – 24OCT20 International scheduled operations as follow. Various travel restrictions as well as ongoing CAAC policy concerning International flights continues to impact the airline’s planned operation.

Guangzhou – Amsterdam 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Auckland 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – Bangkok 1 weekly A330 (2 weekly A321neo/330 from 05SEP20)
Guangzhou – Dhaka 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Kathmandu eff 22AUG20 1 weekly A330
Guangzhou – Kuala Lumpur 2 weekly 787-9
Guangzhou – London Heathrow 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Los Angeles 1 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Manila 1 weekly A330 (2 weekly from 3SEP20)
Guangzhou – Paris CDG 1 weekly A350-900XWB (2 weekly from 03SEP20)
Guangzhou – Phnom Penh 1 weekly 787-9 (2 weekly 787/A320 from 03SEP20)
Guangzhou – Singapore 1 weekly 787-9 (2 weekly A320/330 from 01SEP20)
Guangzhou – Sydney 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Vancouver 2 weekly A380
Guangzhou – Vientiane 1 weekly 737-800
Guangzhou – Yangon 2 weekly A330
Shenyang – Seoul Incheon 1 weekly A330
Shenyang – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330
Urumqi – Islamabad eff 07SEP20 1 weekly 737-800

Published on 21.07.2020
Shenzhen Airlines resumes Tokyo service from late-July 2020

Published on 20.07.2020
Hainan Airlines increases Brussels / Toronto service from mid-July 2020

20.07.2020 China Airlines Group carriers China Airlines and Mandarin Airlines recently filed inventory and schedule changes for the remainder of Northern summer 2020. As of 0500GMT 18JUL20, following 48 routes has been removed from the system until 24OCT20.

Reservation for cancelled routes listed below currently scheduled to resume from 25OCT20, although further changes remain likely in the next few weeks.

China Airlines (CI)
Kaohsiung – Hong Kong
Kaohsiung – Kumamoto
Kaohsiung – Manila
Kaohsiung – Okinawa
Kaohsiung – Osaka Kansai
Kaohsiung – Sapporo New Chitose
Kaohsiung – Seoul Incheon
Kaohsiung – Singapore
Kaohsiung – Tokyo Narita
Tainan – Hong Kong
Tainan – Osaka Kansai
Taipei Taoyuan – Busan
Taipei Taoyuan – Delhi
Taipei Taoyuan – Changsha
Taipei Taoyuan – Chongqing
Taipei Taoyuan – Hiroshima
Taipei Taoyuan – Honolulu
Taipei Taoyuan – Ishigaki
Taipei Taoyuan – Kagoshima
Taipei Taoyuan – Miyazaki
Taipei Taoyuan – Nanchang
Taipei Taoyuan – Nanjing
Taipei Taoyuan – Okinawa
Taipei Taoyuan – Ontario
Taipei Taoyuan – Rome
Taipei Taoyuan – Shizuoka
Taipei Taoyuan – Takamatsu
Taipei Taoyuan – Toyama
Taipei Taoyuan – Vienna
Taipei Taoyuan – Weihai
Taipei Taoyuan – Wuhan
Taipei Taoyuan – Wuxi
Taipei Taoyuan – Xi’An
Taipei Taoyuan – Xuzhou

Mandarin Airlines (AE)
Kaohsiung – Changsha
Kaohsiung – Hangzhou
Kaohsiung – Hong Kong
Taichung – Hangzhou
Taichung – Hanoi
Taichung – Ho Chi Minh City
Taichung – Hong Kong
Taichung – Okinawa
Taichung – Tokyo Narita
Taichung – Wuxi
Taipei Song Shan – Fuzhou
Taipei Song Shan – Wenzhou
Taipei Song Shan – Wuhan
Taipei Taoyuan – Changsha
Taipei Taoyuan – Shenyang
Taipei Taoyuan – Zhengzhou

Published on 17.07.2020
Beijing Capital resumes Lisbon service in late-June 2020
Ruili Airlines July – October 2020 International operations as of 16JUL20

Published on 15.07.2020
Lucky Air resumes Kunming – Bangkok service from July 2020
Kunming Airlines S20 International operation update as of 14JUL20
Shandong Airlines increases Qingdao – Seoul service from July 2020

Published on 13.07.2020
Air China / China Southern launches Comac ARJ21-700 service in July 2020

Published on 09.07.2020
Xiamen Airlines increases Fuzhou – Tokyo service in July 2020

Published on 01.07.2020
Sichuan Airlines’ Cairo-Chengdu flight suspended over COVID-19 cases

27.06.2020 China Airlines Group since earlier this month provided daily update to its planned passenger operation on its website. For the month of July 2020, planned operation as of 23JUN20 as follows. Additional changes remain likely and various travel restrictions will impact the airline’s passenger traffic rights. Note specified departure date listed below is based on TPE departure.

Kaohsiung – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly A330-300
Kaohsiung – Xiamen 1 weekly 737-800 (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Song Shan – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Amsterdam 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Taipei Taoyuan – Bangkok 3 weekly A350-900XWB (4 weekly from 10JUL20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Beijing Capital eff 13JUL20 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Brisbane 1 flight by A350-900XWB every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Chengdu 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Frankfurt 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Taipei Taoyuan – Hanoi 1 weekly A350-900XWB (2 weekly from 19JUL20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Ho Chi Minh City 3 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Hong Kong 1 daily 737-800
Taipei Taoyuan – Jakarta 3 weekly A350-900XWB
Taipei Taoyuan – Koror eff 15JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Taipei Taoyuan – Kuala Lumpur 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – London Heathrow 1 weekly A350-900XWB (Previously reported, this route will temporary replace London Gatwick service until 24OCT20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Los Angeles 2 weekly 777-300ER (3 weekly from 19JUL20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 5 weekly 737-800
Taipei Taoyuan – Melbourne 1 flight by A350-900XWB every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – New York JFK eff 26JUL20 1 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Penang 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Phnom Penh 1 weekly 737-800
Taipei Taoyuan – San Francisco 2 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Shanghai Pu Dong 2 weekly 777-300ER
Taipei Taoyuan – Singapore 1 weekly A330-300 (2 weekly from 15JUL20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Sydney 1 flight by A330-300 every 14 days
Taipei Taoyuan – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300 (2 weekly from 22JUL20)
Taipei Taoyuan – Vancouver 1 weekly A350-900XWB
Taipei Taoyuan – Xiamen 2 weekly A330-300 (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Taoyuan – Yangon 09JUL20 / 26JUL20 737-800
Published on 13.06.2020
China Southern Airlines flight from Dhaka to Guangzhou suspended over COVID-19 cases

09.06.2020 Air China in June 2020 plans to operate following International routes, announced by the airline last week. Planned operation listed below remains subject to change.

Beijing Capital – Athens – Shijiazhuang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Bangkok – Qingdao – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Copenhagen – Shijiazhuang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Dubai – Xi’An – Beijing Capital eff 18JUN20 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Los Angeles – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Madrid – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 747-400
Beijing Capital – Manila – Qingdao – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Minsk – Shenyang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Paris CDG – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Phnom Penh – Zhengzhou – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A321
Beijing Capital – Seoul Incheon – Qingdao – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-300
Beijing Capital – Stockholm Arlanda – Tianjin – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Vancouver – Shenyang – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 777-300ER
Beijing Capital – Vienna – Hohhet – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Warsaw – Taiyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-200
Beijing Capital – Yangon – Zhengzhou – Beijing Capital 1 weekly 737-800
Chengdu – Kathmandu eff 21JUN20 1 weekly A319
Chengdu – Singapore 1 weekly A330-300
Shanghai Pu Dong – Frankfurt 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – London Heathrow 1 weekly 777-300ER
Shanghai Pu Dong – Tokyo Narita 1 weekly A330-300

06.06.2020

Skyteam member China Airlines has provided latest update regarding cross-strait service between Taiwan and Mainland China, for the month of June 2020. Planned operation as follows.

Kaohsiung – Xiamen eff 25JUN20 1 weekly 737-800 (Mandarin Airlines service)
Taipei Song Shan – Shanghai Pu Dong 
2 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Beijing Capital 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Chengdu 1 weekly A330-300
Taipei Taoyuan – Xiamen 1 weekly A330-300 (Mandarin Airlines service)

Published on 05.06.2020

China Airlines June 2020 Cross-Strait operations as of 04JUN20

 

Published on 27.05.2020
Sichuan Airlines S20 Domestic operations as of 24MAY20

Published on 22.05.2020
China Southern June 2020 International/Regional operations as of 21MAY20
Xiamen Airlines June 2020 International operations as of 21MAY20
Juneyao Airlines June 2020 International operations as of 21MAY20

Read more
Full Restrictions
Open for travel from China
Crossing Rules
  • Passengers travelling from Belgium, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Philippines, Russia, Ukraine or United Kingdom are not permitted to enter China. This also includes passengers holding a valid visa or residence permit issued by China.
  • This does not apply to the following passengers:
    • Nationals of China,
    • Passengers holding a diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visa,
    • Visa issued after 3rd November 2020 by a Chinese embassy or consulate for passengers travelling from India, Italy, Russia or United Kingdom,
    • Visa issued after 5th November 2020 by a Chinese embassy or consulate for passengers travelling from Bangladesh or Ukraine.
    Read more
    Flight Restrictions

    published 27.11.2020

    Entry restrictions
    A completed “Exit/Entry Health Declaration Form” must be presented upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at health.customsapp.com.

    Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in Taiwan (Chinese Taipei)
    Passengers arriving from Chinese Taipei must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) nucleic acid test result issued at most 72 hours before departure.

    Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in United States
    Nationals of China (People’s Rep.) arriving directly from the USA must have a green QR code with an ‘HS’ mark. The code can be obtained from the WeChat App ‘Fang Yi Jian Kang Ma Guo Ji Ban’ by uploading a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) nucleic acid test result issued at most 48 hours before departure and a negative IgM anti-body test result issued at most 48 hours before departure. Passengers not arriving directly in China (People’s Rep.) must repeat both tests in the transit countries and obtain a new green QR code with an ‘HS’ mark in each transit country.
    – This does not apply to passengers younger than 3 years.

    Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in Canada
    Passengers arriving directly from Canada must have a printed negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) nucleic acid test result and a printed negative IgM anti-body test result. Both tests must have been taken at most 2 days before departure. Passengers not arriving directly in China (People’s Rep.) must repeat both tests in the transit countries.

    Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Congo Democratic Republic, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Cuba, Cyprus, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Iran, Israel, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, North Macedonia, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, St Vincent and The Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vietnam, Zambia

    Nationals of China (People’s Rep.) who are arriving from or have transited through Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Rep., Chad, Colombia, Congo, Congo (Dem. Rep.), Costa Rica, Cote d’Ivoire, Cuba, Cyprus, Djibouti, Dominican Rep., Ecuador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Eswatini (Swaziland), Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Indonesia, Iran, Ireland (Rep.), Israel, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Mauritania, Moldova (Rep.), Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, North Macedonia (Rep.), Oman, Palestinian Territory, Panama, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam or Zambia must have a green QR code with an ‘HS’ mark. The code can be obtained from the WeChat App ‘Fang Yi Jian Kang Ma Guo Ji Ban’ by uploading a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) nucleic acid test result issued at most 3 days before departure.

    Entry restrictions for passengers who arrive from or have been in Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Czechia, Denmark, Egypt, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montenegro, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe

    Nationals of China (People’s Rep.) arriving directly from Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Czechia, Denmark, Egypt, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Malaysia, Mauritius, Mexico, Montenegro, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, Romania, Russian Fed., Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom or Zimbabwe must have a green QR code with an ‘HS’ mark. The code can be obtained from the WeChat App ‘Fang Yi Jian Kang Ma Guo Ji Ban’ by uploading a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) nucleic acid test result issued at most 48 hours before departure and a negative IgM anti-body test result issued at most 48 hours before departure. Passengers not arriving directly in China (People’s Rep.) must repeat both tests in the transit countries and obtain a new green QR code with an ‘HS’ mark in each transit country.

    Read more
    Quarantine

    published 27.11.2020

    Forced isolation
    Passengers are subject to medical screening and quarantine for 14 days at the first point of entry.

    Insurance
    Certification

    COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.

    You must provide evidence of a negative test for COVID-19 taken no more than 3 days before you travel. This has changed from 5 days. The Chinese authorities have specified a ‘nucleic acid’ test which they have explained is the standard test for COVID-19.

    Vaccination

    Yellow fever (2019)
    Country requirement at entry: a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers aged 9 months
    or over arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited
    through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. This requirement does not apply to
    travellers whose itineraries are limited to Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) and Macao SAR.
    WHO vaccination recommendation: no

    Malaria (2019)
    China has achieved tremendous success in malaria elimination. Since 2017, no indigenous cases have been
    reported.
    WHO recommended prevention in risk areas: A

    Read more

    Full Restrictions

  • China Latest News: China authorities suspend special flights from India as COVID-19 cases rise (Hindustan Times, 05.11.2020). Chinese government suspends entry for residents of Britain because of increase in COVID-19 infections in U.K. (AP, 05.11.2020). 70 percent of flights in, out of Kashi, Xinjiang canceled as four high-risk counties reportedly in lockdown (Global Times China, 26.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week.
    *Entry and transit: You will need a valid visa to enter China. Chinese Visa Application Centres have re-opened. If you are issued a visa to travel to China you will need to submit a Health Declaration Form to your nearest Chinese Embassy or Consulate before you travel, who will need to certify your form and return it to you via email. In order to receive a Health Declaration Form from a Chinese Embassy you must provide evidence of negative nucleic acid and IgM antibody tests for COVID-19 taken no more than 48 hours before you travel. Rules may be subject to change. More information check your local Chinese Embassy website. You should check your eligibility for a visa and Health Declaration Form with a Chinese Embassy or Consulate before booking travel. A limited number of international flights are flying into Beijing. Other international passenger flights to Beijing continue to be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao.
    *Health checks on arrival: All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks on arrival (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests). Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing. You should contact your local Chinese Embassy before you travel if you have any questions regarding these entry requirements, quarantine rules or the requirements for individual cities.
    *Quarantine requirements: Following health checks on arrival, you will then need to enter quarantine for at least 14 days. You will be separated from your child if one of you tests positive for coronavirus. If this happens to you, you can call +86 (0)10 8529 6600 for 24/7 urgent consular assistance. Non-residents may be charged for their care. For further information on healthcare in China, please see the Coronavirus section Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel (with costs covered by the traveller) or your home. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Follow-up swab tests are likely to take place during your quarantine period. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital. For all quarantine arrangements in China:
    • Unless directed by the authorities you are not allowed to leave your designated quarantine location for 14 days. This means you are also unable to leave China for the duration of the quarantine. • Depending on the quarantine location, facilities may be basic: there may be no fridge, no air-conditioning, and limited or no internet/wifi. • During your stay you will be responsible for cleaning the room • If meals are not available at the quarantine location, you will need to arrange food orders for delivery from outside. • Larger sized families with two parents may be separated into 2 rooms. If you’re on prescription medication make sure you bring enough with you to last for at least 3-4 weeks together with medical documents certifying that you need to take this medication. Failure to comply with the quarantine conditions or testing put in place, or any attempts to deliberately conceal health conditions can result in being sentenced to up to three years in prison. This applies to both Chinese and foreign nationals.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in China: Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level and procedures vary, so check in advance. The possibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high. There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. You should keep up to date with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19. In Guangzhou, in particular, there have been reports of discrimination on the basis of ethnicity, especially of those who are black and minority ethnic, including additional enforced quarantine and testing, as well as hotels and businesses not serving clients.

    Read more
    05.11.2020
  • China Latest News: Domestic travelers to, from Shanghai face mandatory 14-day quarantine amid COVID-19 concerns (Shine, 12.10.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week.
    *Entry and transit: You will need a valid visa to enter China. Chinese Visa Application Centres have re-opened. More information on the categories of visas and requirements are available at Chinese Embassies and MFA websiter.
    From 28 September 2020, holders of valid residence permits attached to work, personal matters and reunion can re-enter China. Holders of expired residence permits can apply for a new one. You should check the eligibility of your visa with a Chinese Embassy or Consulate before booking travel.
    From 21 August, you will also need to submit a Health Declaration Form to your nearest Chinese Embassy or Consulate before you travel. The Chinese Embassy/Consulate will certify your form and return it to you via email. More details on these requirements, including the process for submitting your form, can be found from your local Chinese Embassy. From 7 September, alongside the form, you must provide evidence of a negative test for COVID-19 taken no more than 3 days before you travel. This has changed from 5 days. The Chinese authorities have specified a ‘nucleic acid’ test which they have explained is the standard test for COVID-19. A limited number of international flights are flying into Beijing. Other international passenger flights to Beijing continue to be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao.
    *Health checks on arrival: All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks on arrival (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests). Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment.
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing. You should contact the Chinese Embassy before you travel if you have any questions regarding these entry requirements, quarantine rules or the requirements for individual cities.
    *Quarantine requirements: Following health checks on arrival, you will then need to enter quarantine for at least 14 days. You may be separated from your child if one of you tests positive for coronavirus. Non-residents may be charged for their care. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralized government hotel (with costs covered by the traveller) or your home. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Follow-up swab tests are likely to take place during your quarantine period. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital. For all quarantine arrangements in China: • Unless directed by the authorities you are not allowed to leave your designated quarantine location for 14 days. This means you are also unable to leave China for the duration of the quarantine
    • Depending on the quarantine location, facilities may be basic: there may be no fridge, no air-conditioning, and limited or no internet/wifi. • During your stay you will be responsible for cleaning the room. • If meals are not available at the quarantine location, you will need to arrange food orders for delivery from outside. • Larger sized families with two parents may be separated into 2 rooms. • If you’re on prescription medication make sure you bring enough with you to last for at least 3-4 weeks together with medical documents certifying that you need to take this medication.
    Failure to comply with the quarantine conditions or testing put in place, or any attempts to deliberately conceal health conditions can result in being sentenced to up to three years in prison. This applies to both Chinese and foreign nationals.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in China: Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level and procedures vary, so check in advance. The possibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high. There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. You should keep up to date with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19. In Guangzhou, in particular, there have been reports of discrimination on the basis of ethnicity, especially of those who are black and minority ethnic, including additional enforced quarantine and testing, as well as hotels and businesses not serving clients.

    Read more
    23.10.2020
  • China Latest News: Beijing-bound flights from Austria, Cambodia, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Pakistan, Sweden and Thailand will gradually resume operation. (CGTN, 02.09.2020) Passengers from mainland China to be allowed temporary transit through Hong Kong (Channel News Asia, 13.08.2020). China’s aviation regulator suspends Etihad Airways, SriLankan Airlines on Shaghai routes starting 17 August (Reuters, 11.08.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    You will need a valid visa to enter China. Chinese Visa Application Centres have re-opened. From 28 September 2020, holders of valid residence permits attached to work, personal matters and reunion can re-enter China. Holders of expired residence permits can apply for a new one.
    From 21 August, if you’re travelling to China you will also need to submit a Health Declaration Form to your nearest Chinese Embassy or Consulate before you travel. The Chinese Embassy/Consulate will certify your form and return it to you via email.
    From 7 September, alongside the form, you must provide evidence of a negative test for COVID-19 taken no more than 3 days before you travel. The Chinese authorities have specified a ‘nucleic acid’ test which they have explained is the standard test for COVID-19.
    A limited number of international flights are flying into Beijing. Other international passenger flights to Beijing continue to be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao.
    All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks on arrival (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests). Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment.
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing.
    Following health checks on arrival, you will then need to enter quarantine for at least 14 days.
    Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel (with costs covered by the traveller) or your home. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province.
    Follow-up swab tests are likely to take place during your quarantine period. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    30.09.2020
  • China Beijing-bound flights from Austria, Cambodia, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Pakistan, Sweden and Thailand will gradually resume operation. (CGTN, 02.09.2020) Passengers from mainland China to be allowed temporary transit through Hong Kong (Channel News Asia, 13.08.2020). China’s aviation regulator suspends Etihad Airways, SriLankan Airlines on Shaghai routes starting 17 August (Reuters, 11.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Entry to foreign nationals on visas issued before 27 March 2020 remains suspended. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Otherwise, you will need to apply for a new visa.
    **EU: On Tuesday, August 11, Chinese authorities announced that citizens from 36 European countries would be permitted to enter the country, provided they have a Chinese residence permit. All arrivals into China must provide a negative COVID-19 test, which is to be taken within five days prior to boarding.
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao. China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March. This includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas.
    All travellers arriving in China must present a QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” before they travel. From 7th September, alongside the form, travellers must provide evidence of a negative test for COVID-19 taken no more than 3 days before travel. The Chinese authorities have specified a ‘nucleic acid’ test which they have explained is the standard test for COVID-19.
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing, check with the airline or Chinese aithorities before travelling. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swab tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel or your home. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    11.09.2020
  • China Beijing-bound flights from Austria, Cambodia, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Pakistan, Sweden and Thailand will gradually resume operation. (CGTN, 02.09.2020) Passengers from mainland China to be allowed temporary transit through Hong Kong (Channel News Asia, 13.08.2020). China’s aviation regulator suspends Etihad Airways, SriLankan Airlines on Shaghai routes starting 17 August (Reuters, 11.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Entry to foreign nationals on visas issued before 27 March 2020 remains suspended. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Otherwise, you will need to apply for a new visa.
    **EU: On Tuesday, August 11, Chinese authorities announced that citizens from 36 European countries would be permitted to enter the country, provided they have a Chinese residence permit. All arrivals into China must provide a negative COVID-19 test, which is to be taken within five days prior to boarding.
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao. China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March. This includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas.
    All travellers arriving in China must present a QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” before they travel. From 7th September, alongside the form, travellers must provide evidence of a negative test for COVID-19 taken no more than 3 days before travel.
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing, check with the airline or Chinese aithorities before travelling. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swab tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel or your home. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    04.09.2020
  • China Passengers from mainland China to be allowed temporary transit through Hong Kong (Channel News Asia, 13.08.2020). China’s aviation regulator suspends Etihad Airways, SriLankan Airlines on Shaghai routes starting 17 August (Reuters, 11.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Entry to foreign nationals on visas issued before 27 March 2020 remains suspended. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Otherwise, you will need to apply for a new visa.
    **EU: On Tuesday, August 11, Chinese authorities announced that citizens from 36 European countries would be permitted to enter the country, provided they have a Chinese residence permit. All arrivals into China must provide a negative COVID-19 test, which is to be taken within five days prior to boarding.
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao. China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March. This includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas.
    All travelers arriving in China must present a QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at [http://health.customsapp.com/].
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing, check with the airline or Chinese aithorities before travelling. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swab tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel or your home. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    17.08.2020
  • China China’s aviation regulator suspends Etihad Airways, SriLankan Airlines on Shaghai routes starting 17 August (Reuters, 11.08.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    **EU: On Tuesday, August 11, Chinese authorities announced that citizens from 36 European countries would be permitted to enter the country, provided they have a Chinese residence permit. All arrivals into China must provide a negative COVID-19 test, which is to be taken within five days prior to boarding.
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao. China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March. This includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas.
    All travelers arriving in China must present a QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at [http://health.customsapp.com/].
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing, check with the airline or Chinese aithorities before travelling. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swab tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel or your home. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    12.08.2020
  • China *****

    International restrictions:

    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. A small number of international flights are also operating direct between European cities and Shanghai, Guangzhou and Qingdao. China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March. This includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas.
    Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing, check with the airline or Chinese aithorities before travelling. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swab tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Quarantine is usually spent at either a centralised government hotel or your home. Family members of someone who tests positive, or those who have been in close contact, will be required to go into a government quarantine hospital.

    *****Internal Restrictions:
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.
    Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020).

    Read more
    05.08.2020
  • China Passengers of China flights required to provide negative COVID-19 test results prior to boarding (Reuters, 21.07.2020). Authorities tighten restrictions in Urumqi because of spike in COVID-19 cases (CNN, 20.07.2020). Shenzhen Bao’an International Airport resumes international passenger flights after suspension because of COVID-19 outbreak. (Xinhua, 18.07.2020). Hundreds of flights to and from Urumqi, the capital of China’s far western region of Xinjiang, were canceled on Friday, after the region reported the first confirmed case of coronavirus. (Al Jazeera, 17.07.2020)
    Flights and trains canceled as Beijing authorities upgrade emergency response to COVID-19 (Business Standard, 17.06.2020)
    On July 16th ferry service between Taipa Ferry Terminal and Hong Kong International Airport will close (Macau Government Portal, 24.10.2020)

    *****

    International restrictions:

    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week.
    China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March, this includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swap tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Families, including those with children, may be separated upon entering quarantine. Those undergoing centralised quarantine will be asked to cover the fees for the duration. Before you travel, check with your airline, travel operator or hotel for any changes or restrictions. China issued an order to ensure compliance with health and quarantine regulations at borders. Refusal to comply with procedures or testing put in place or any attempts to deliberately conceal health conditions can result in being sentenced to up to three years in prison. This applies to both Chinese and foreign nationals.

    *****Internal Restrictions
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.

    Read more
    21.07.2020
  • China Flights and trains canceled as Beijing authorities upgrade emergency response to COVID-19 (Business Standard, 17.06.2020)

    *****Internationsl restrictions:
    Commercial flights are operating to and from China. International airlines may only maintain one route to China, operating one flight per week.
    China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March, this includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swap tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Families, including those with children, may be separated upon entering quarantine. Those undergoing centralised quarantine will be asked to cover the fees for the duration. Before you travel, check with your airline, travel operator or hotel for any changes or restrictions. China issued an order to ensure compliance with health and quarantine regulations at borders. Refusal to comply with procedures or testing put in place or any attempts to deliberately conceal health conditions can result in being sentenced to up to three years in prison. This applies to both Chinese and foreign nationals.

    *****Internal Restrictions
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.

    Read more
    09.07.2020
  • China Flights and trains canceled as Beijing authorities upgrade emergency response to COVID-19 (Business Standard, 17.06.2020)

    *****Internationsl restrictions:
    China has suspended entry to foreign nationals with visas issued before 27 March, this includes transit passengers. The only exemptions will be diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas. Individuals coming to China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities, or for emergency humanitarian needs, may apply for new visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. All international passenger flights to Beijing will be diverted to 16 designated airports in Chengdu, Changsha, Hefei, Lanzhou, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Hohhot, Jinan, Qingdao, Nanjing, Shenyang, Dalian, Zhengzhou, Xi’an and Wuhan. Health regulations surrounding passengers arriving from overseas are continuously changing. All overseas passenger arrivals are subject to health checks (likely involving nucleic acid or swab tests), including during transit, followed by a centralised quarantine period of at least 14 days – costs for which to be covered by the passenger. During this period follow-up swap tests are likely to take place. Those failing health checks may be sent to a designated hospital for treatment. Quarantine requirements can change at short notice and may differ from province to province. Families, including those with children, may be separated upon entering quarantine. Those undergoing centralised quarantine will be asked to cover the fees for the duration. Before you travel, check with your airline, travel operator or hotel for any changes or restrictions. China issued an order to ensure compliance with health and quarantine regulations at borders. Refusal to comply with procedures or testing put in place or any attempts to deliberately conceal health conditions can result in being sentenced to up to three years in prison. This applies to both Chinese and foreign nationals.

    *****Internal Restrictions
    Mandatory requirements to check temperatures and use health apps or scan QR codes to prove travel history are in place at transport hubs, hotels, commercial buildings including restaurants, residential compounds and other locations – such locations are also increasingly requiring use of ‘health kit code’ apps to demonstrate health condition and travel history. Restrictions on movement and quarantine arrangements remain for travel between different parts of the country. Some cities and provinces require travellers from high to medium risk areas to undergo 14 days of isolation in their place of residence or in centralised observation. Quarantine is enforced at the neighbourhood level, procedures vary, it is recommended to check in advance. The posibility that local authorities impose mandatory quarantine in response to fresh outbreaks is high There have been reports of individuals who have frequented bars or restaurants where there have been confirmed cases of COVID-19 being mandated to undergo 14 days of centralised quarantine. A record should be kept with the latest developments and this travel advice. There have been reports of discrimination against foreign nationals in China as a result of a perceived risk that they might re-import COVID-19.

    Read more
    26.06.2020
  • China Flights and trains canceled as Beijing authorities upgrade emergency response to COVID-19 (Business Standard, 17.06.2020)

    1. The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well.
    – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected.
    – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected.
    2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days.
    3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.
    4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test.
    5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses.
    – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.
    6. Airline crew of foreign airlines:
    – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR
    – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR
    – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.
    7. A QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” must be presented to immigration upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at http://health.customsapp.com/ .

    *****Entry restrictions:
    Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan.
    The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days.
    All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.
    The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future.
    All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport.
    Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities.
    Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests.

    Beijing: Beijing is reintroducing strict lockdown measures and rolling out mass testing after a fresh cluster of novel coronavirus cases emerged. (CNN, 15.06.2020)

    As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020)

    Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III.
    A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance.
    As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside.
    Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means:
    A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.
    Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc.
    If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.
    On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    17.06.2020
  • China Chinese government will allow some barred airlines to fly into mainland starting 8 June (Reuters, 03.06.2020). Aviation authorities to extend restrictions on international flights until 30 June (Reuters, 28.05.2020)

    1. The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well.
    – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected.
    – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected.
    2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days.
    3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.
    4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test.
    5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses.
    – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.
    6. Airline crew of foreign airlines:
    – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR
    – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR
    – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.
    7. A QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” must be presented to immigration upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at http://health.customsapp.com/ .

    Entry restrictions:
    Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan.
    The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days.
    All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.
    The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future.
    All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport.
    Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities.
    Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests.

    Beijing: Beijing is reintroducing strict lockdown measures and rolling out mass testing after a fresh cluster of novel coronavirus cases emerged. (CNN, 15.06.2020)

    As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020)

    Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III.
    A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance.
    As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside.
    Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means:
    A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.
    Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc.
    If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.
    On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    15.06.2020
  • China Chinese government will allow some barred airlines to fly into mainland starting 8 June (Reuters, 03.06.2020). Aviation authorities to extend restrictions on international flights until 30 June (Reuters, 28.05.2020)

    1. The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well.
    – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected.
    – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected.
    2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days.
    3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.
    4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test.
    5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses.
    – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.
    6. Airline crew of foreign airlines:
    – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR
    – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR
    – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.
    7. A QR code generated from a completed “Health Declaration Form” must be presented to immigration upon arrival. The form can be obtained before departure at http://health.customsapp.com/ .

    Entry restrictions:
    Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan.
    The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days.
    All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.
    The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future.
    All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport.
    Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities.
    Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests.
    Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance.
    As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020)

    Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III.
    A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance.
    As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside.
    Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means:
    A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.
    Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc.
    If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.
    On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    12.06.2020
  • China Aviation authorities to extend restrictions on international flights until 30 June (Reuters, 28.05.2020)
    1. The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well.
    – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected.
    – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected.
    2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days.
    3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.
    4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test.
    5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses.
    – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home.
    6. Airline crew of foreign airlines:
    – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR
    – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR
    – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.

    Entry restrictions:
    Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.
    Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan.
    The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days.
    All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.
    The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future.
    All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport.
    Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities.
    Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests.
    Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance.
    As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020)

    Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III.
    A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance.
    As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside.
    Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means:
    A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.
    Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc.
    If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.
    On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    01.06.2020
  • China 1. The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well. – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected. – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected. 2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days. 3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation. 4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test. 5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses. – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home. 6. Airline crew of foreign airlines: – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections. Entry restrictions Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan. The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days. All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar. The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future. All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport. Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020) Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community. Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures. On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    25.05.2020
  • China Entry restrictions Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan. The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days. All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar. The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future. All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport. Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020) Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community. Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures. On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    21.05.2020
  • China Entry restrictions Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. Many local governments require inbound travellers to inform their local company office and neighbourhood committee in advance about their travel plan. The number of international passenger flights is reduced. In Beijing, international flights are not landing directly at Beijing Capital International Airport (PEK), but are diverted first to other domestic airports in Dalian, Hohhot, Jinan, Nanjing, Qingdao, Shanghai Pudong, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Xi’an and Zhengzhou for screening. Travellers will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine at a designated facility upon entry. After clearing the 14-day quarantine, if the traveller enters Beijing after the second day the traveller clears the quarantine, the traveller will have to undergo another 14-day quarantine either at home or a designated facility for 14 additional days. All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar. The Chinese Government is in discussions with foreign governments on “fast-track” procedures to allow key employees of foreign companies to return to China. So far, “fast-track” commercial charter flights have been arranged with Germany and South Korea and may be extended to other countries in the future. All transit/transfer services, including air transit/transfer, cross boundary land transport and cross boundary ferry transfer, are suspended for all passengers at Hong Kong International Airport. Residents with travel history in Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea, Iran, as well as Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy and Veneto regions in Italy in the past 14 days will be required upon entry to stay in a quarantine centre for 14 days. Residents with travel history in any other overseas locations in the preceding 14 days will be subject to a 14-day mandatory quarantine.

    Internal restrictions:

    Mainland China: Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended.All villages and residential compounds in the city were closed off, and only one person from each household allowed out for two hours every second day for essentials. (The Guardian, 19.05.2020) Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community. Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures. On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    19.05.2020
  • China On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    14.05.2020
  • China The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well. – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected. – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates.

    – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected. 2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days. 3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation. 4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test. 5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses. – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home. 6. Airline crew of foreign airlines: – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.

    Internal restrictions:

    Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended. Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code.

    Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures. On 13 May, Jilin city was announced to be ‘sealed’. Transportations services such as intercity buses and trains for Jilin city are suspended now. People who want to move out of the city need the nucleic acid test within 48 hours of travel and register the information according to official instructions.

    Read more
    14.05.2020
  • China The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well. – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected. – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected. 2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days. 3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation. 4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test. 5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses. – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home. 6. Airline crew of foreign airlines: – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.

    Internal restrictions:

    Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Jilin: the northeast Chinese city of Jilin imposed fresh restrictions on travel in order to contain a new coronavirus outbreak. (Reuters, 13.05.2020) Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended. Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community. Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.

    Source: https://www.iatatravelcentre.com/international-travel-document-news/1580226297.htm https://china.usembassy-china.org.cn/covid-19-information/ https://pandemic.internationalsos.com/2019-ncov/ncov-travel-restrictions-flight-operations-and-screening

    Read more
    13.05.2020
  • China The mainland of China has decided to temporarily suspend the entry into the mainland of China by foreign nationals holding visas or residence permits still valid to the time of this announcement, effective from 00:00 local time, 28 March 2020. Entry by foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards will be suspended as well. – Policies including port visas, 24/72/144-hour visa-free transit policy, Hainan 30-day visa-free policy, 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao SAR, and Guangxi 15-day visa-free policy specified for foreign tour groups of ASEAN countries will also be temporarily suspended. Entry with diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visas will not be affected. – Foreign nationals coming to the mainland of China for necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or out of emergency humanitarian needs may apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. – Entry by foreign nationals with visas issued after this announcement will not be affected. 2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days. 3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation. 4. Passengers who live in or have been in France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea (Rep.), Spain or USA in the past 14 days arriving at Guangzhou (CAN) or Shenzhen (SZX) must undergo 14-day quarantine at home or in designated places for medical observation. All passengers arriving at SZX will have a PCR test. 5. All passengers arriving at XMN will be quarantined for medical observation at the designated hotels for 14 days on their own expenses. – This does not apply to passengers under 18 years old, passengers above 70 years old, pregnant women and passengers suffering from illness. They must apply for permission to undergo a 14-day quarantine at home. 6. Airline crew of foreign airlines: – are not required to undergo nucleic acid test if they have a short stay after landing then depart immediately, and do not leave apron during the transition; OR – shall receive nucleic acid test in the first port of entry if they need to enter the country to rest or continue to operate domestic routes. The test results will be confirmed by the local government in accordance with the requirements of epidemic prevention management. Only if the test results are negative, crews can continue the operations; OR – are allowed to return to their home country for isolation treatment when agreed by the local joint control mechanism, if they are symptomatic, in close contact with infected persons or tested positive. Airlines and crews shall make all commitments to bear their responsibilities and also carry out strict protections.

    Internal restrictions:

    Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities. Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests. Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance. As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. On 10 May, Shulan (Jilin province) raised its risk level to ‘high’ due to new local cases, and has re-strengthened restrictions on local movement and public gathering. Several train routes to/from Shulan have also been suspended. Another example is Taiyuan (who did so on 3 May), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level. In Shanghai and Guangdong, public health emergency response levels have been changed from level II to level III. A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside. Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means: A reduction of exit/entry access to the community. Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc. If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.

    Read more
    12.05.2020
  • China As of 29 March foreign airlines will be required to maintain only one air route to China and operate no more than one flight per week. Chinese domestic airlines are also expected to further reduce available routes per guidelines. Flights to and from China should carry no more than 75 percent of the passengers that they are licensed to carry. (OSAC, 02.04.2020)

    All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.

    1. Passengers are not allowed to transit or enter China (People’s Rep.).
    – This does not apply to nationals of China (People’s Rep.).
    – This does not apply to passengers with a Hong Kong (SAR China) passport or a Macao (SAR China) passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a Chinese Taipei (on the cover: Republic of China Taiwan) passport.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a diplomatic, service, courtesy or C visa.
    – This does not apply to passengers with a visa issued after 28 March 2020.
    2. All passengers arriving at PEK will have a PCR test and be quarantined at the designated location in Beijing for 14 days.
    3. Passengers arriving at Shanghai Pudong (PVG) or Shanghai Hongqiao (SHA) must undergo a Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and a 14-day quarantine in designated places for medical observation.
    – This does not apply to airline crew members.

    Entry restrictions: Foreigners with visas or residence permits still valid from 28 March are restricted from entering China. This includes foreign nationals with APEC Business Travel Cards, port visas, persons who qualify for 24/72/144-hour visa free transit policies, Hainan 30 day visa-free policy, 15 day visa-free policy specified for foreign cruise-group-tour through Shanghai Port, Guangdong 144-hour visa-free transit policy for foreign tour groups from Hong Kong or Macao Special Administrative Regions and Guangxi 15 day visa-free policies for foreign tour groups from ASEAN countries. Diplomatic, Courtesy or C-Class visas will not be affected. Foreign nationals involved in necessary economic, trade, scientific or technological activities or for emergency and humanitarian needs may also apply for visas at Chinese embassies or consulates. All land border crossings between China and Russia have been closed to travellers. Yunnan province has banned citizens from leaving the country by more than 30 land and river ports at the province’s borders with Vietnam, Laos, and Myanmar.

    Internal restrictions:

    Railway stations and airports have gradually resumed operations and most provinces have resumed their inter-provincial road passenger transportation. Restrictions on public transportation and private car movement have been lifted in most cities.
    Hubei province: Restrictions on outbound travel from Hubei province were lifted on 25 March, and restrictions in Wuhan have been lifted on 8 April. Railway and passenger flights have started to resume accordingly with the lifting of restrictions (Wuhan Tianhe International Airport resumed domestic flights on 8 April); however, international flights and flights to/from Beijing will remain suspended until further notice. Those who want to leave Hubei should confirm with their destination city on the local requirements. Various cities and provinces require all travellers from Wuhan to take nucleic acid tests (including Shenzhen, Zhejiang, etc). Shanghai encourages employers to let returning staff from certain areas take nucleic acid tests.
    Beijing: On 29 April, the Beijing government announced a new policy that business travellers and returnees who come from domestic ‘COVID-19 low risk’ areas to Beijing will NOT need the 14 days of home quarantine. People who have travelled from low risk areas to Beijing and are currently under home quarantine can halt their home quarantine and medical observation if applicable. The new Beijing policy does not apply to travellers from overseas, Hubei province or other domestic ‘medium and high risk areas’. Personnel returning from Hubei need to register information online in advance and get a negative nucleic acid test certificate before purchasing the returning ticket. After arrival, they need to show the test certificate to enter the community, follow the 14-day quarantine requirement, and take another test before lifting the quarantine. Domestic travellers planning to stay at hotels must present a ‘green’ health code. Chaoyang District has been rated as ‘high’ risk due to recent cluster cases. Travellers from ‘high’ risk areas are possible to face quarantine and other requirements when entering other provinces and cities. As such requirements vary across the country, travellers need to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel in advance.
    As the situation continues to improve across the country, almost all the cities and provinces have declared the local risk level to be low. The latest city is Suifenhe, the border city with Russia in Heilongjiang province, who adjusted its risk level to low from May 6. However, some cities also chose to strengthen their quarantine measures due to re-emergence of local or imported cases. The latest example is Taiyuan (who did so May 3), Shanxi provincial capital, although it didn’t announce any change to its risk or response level.
    A new directive has been issued providing more detailed guidance on community quarantine management, including a new clause that says for low-risk areas and communities with no cases detected, inbound travellers from non-high-risk areas are exempted from mandatory quarantine as long as they hold a ‘green’ health code and arrive directly (without a stopover in a high-risk area). As the risk levels still vary across the country, travellers are advised to confirm with the local residence committee or hotel about quarantine requirements in advance.
    A mobile application called ‘health code’ (or similar) with different colour code (typically green, yellow, red) is being used to indicate the level of movement clearance for individual users. A green code gives permission to freedom of movement while yellow or red may indicate that 7-14 days’ quarantine is required. As each province has different variations of the application, travellers will need to check the relevant application for their destination and register their information online to get the ‘health code’ before the trip. Heilongjiang announced an ‘in-city code’ in addition to the three-colour health code. Personnel with ‘in-city code’ are restricted to travel out of their current city but can move freely inside.
    Although such restrictions are easing, many provinces and cities still have in place community ‘close-off’ style management which means:
    A reduction of exit/entry access to the community.
    Access control of visitors and visiting vehicles: ID check/registration, temperature measurement at gate, delivery service is to be picked up at the gate of community etc.
    If there are confirmed cases in a certain community, there might be a closure of certain units/areas for quarantine depending on the severity of the local outbreak. In Heilongjiang province, re-emergence of local cases has led to strengthening of such measures.
    Hong Kong: The ten land boundary control points between Hong Kong and mainland China have been closed. The authorities have suspended ferries and high-speed trains, as well as the Hong Kong section of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link and the Intercity Through Train which is served by Hung Hom Station.
    Individuals who have visited Hubei province in the 14 days before arriving in Hong Kong are barred from entering the city.
    Non-Hong Kong residents coming from mainland China, Macao (SAR) and Taiwan (China) will also be denied entry if they have been to any overseas countries or regions in the preceding 14 days.
    All residents and non-residents coming from mainland China, Macao (SAR) and Taiwan (China) are also subject to a 14-day compulsory quarantine. However, travellers entering Hong Kong for educational or essential business purposes (subject to the approval of the local authorities) are not required to undertake compulsory quarantine at designated facilities. Exempted travellers will be required to comply with the Department of Health’s medical surveillance program.
    All travellers entering Hong Kong are required to complete and submit health declaration forms.
    Schools will resume in three phases from 27 May until 15 June. A ban on public gatherings of more than eight people will be applied from 8 May, increased from four persons. From 8 May, entertainment and sports premises will reopen in stages. The first stage includes reopening of entertainment venues excluding karaoke bars, nightclubs and party rooms, as well as cinemas, gyms, and beauty and massage parlours. Each venue should not exceed more than 50 people or half of its capacity, though this restriction does not apply to restaurants. A 1.5m (5 feet) social-distancing rule remains applied in all businesses and public premises, as well as a maximum of eight people at a table. Most civil servants have returned to workplaces since 4 May.

    Read more
    10.05.2020
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    OSAC Travel Advisories/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    National Health Commission/
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