En De
Total doses
given
143.8M
People fully
vaccinated
48M
% Fully
vaccinated
81.26%
Pre-travel testing (vaccinated): None
Pre-travel testing (unvaccinated): None
Test on arrival (vaccinated): None
Test on arrival (unvaccinated): None

Full Restrictions:

11.03.2023

COVID-19 rules

Countries may restrict travel or bring in rules at short notice. Check with your travel company or airline for changes.

If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

Visit TravelHealthPro (from the UK’s National Travel Health Network and Centre) for general COVID-19 advice for travellers.

Travel to Italy

There are no COVID-19 testing or vaccination requirements for passengers entering Italy.

More information on entry requirements from the UK and other countries can be found on the Ministry of Health website.

Public spaces and travel within Italy

If you are visiting a healthcare facility such as a hospital ward, care home, or doctor’s office, you must wear a FFP2 mask.

You may be asked to provide a negative COVID-19 test result, regardless of your vaccination status. This can be either a rapid antigen test taken within the previous 48 hours, or a PCR test taken within the previous 72 hours. Self-tests are not accepted. Check with the local health authority or healthcare facility before visiting.

Regional and local authorities in Italy can adjust these measures where required. This may occur at short notice. You should consult the websites for the regions in which you are travelling for the latest information.

Passport validity requirements

If you are travelling to an EU country (except Ireland), or Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or Vatican City, you must follow the Schengen area passport requirements.

Your passport must be:

  • issued less than 10 years before the date you enter the country (check the ‘date of issue’)
  • valid for at least 3 months after the day you plan to leave (check the ‘expiry date’)

You must check if your passport meets these requirements before you travel. If your passport was issued before 1 October 2018, extra months may have been added to its expiry date.

Contact the embassy of the country you are visiting if you think that your passport does not meet both these requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

Check with your transport provider or travel company that your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Passport stamping

At Italian border control, you may need to:

  • show proof of your accommodation, for example, a hotel booking confirmation or proof of address if visiting your own property (for example, a second home)
  • show proof of insurance for your trip – check FCDO’s travel insurance guidance
  • show a return or onward ticket
  • prove that you have enough money for your stay. The minimum amount required depends on your accommodation
  • follow procedures if you are hosting a guest at your property in Italy

Check your passport is stamped if you enter or exit the Schengen area through Italy as a visitor. Border guards will use passport stamps to check you’re complying with the 90-day visa-free limit for short stays in the Schengen area. If relevant entry or exit stamps are not in your passport, border guards will presume that you have overstayed your visa-free limit.

You can show evidence of when and where you entered or exited the Schengen area and ask the border guards to add this date and location in your passport. Examples of acceptable evidence include boarding passes and tickets.

Unless you are staying in a hotel or B&B, if you are entering from a Schengen area country (for example, France) you must declare your presence (‘dichiarazione di presenza’) to the local immigration authority (‘questura’) within 8 days of arriving. The ‘questura’ will provide a form to complete.

You can find more information on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs or Italian police force websites.

If you are resident in Italy, read our Living in Italy guide for passport stamping information.

Visa requirements

You can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel:

  • as a tourist
  • to visit family or friends
  • to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events
  • for short-term studies or training

If you are travelling to Italy and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days.

To stay longer (to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons), you must meet the Italian government’s entry requirements. Check which type of visa or work permit you may need with the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs or Italian Consulates in London, Manchester or Edinburgh before booking an appointment.

If you are travelling to Italy for work, read the guidance on visas and permits.

If you stay in Italy with a residence permit or long-stay visa, this does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

British citizens who cannot return to the UK before the expiry of their visa or permit, or the end of their visa-free limit should contact their local immigration office (‘questura’).

Vaccination requirements (other than COVID-19)

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the vaccinations and vaccination certificates you may need on TravelHealthPro (from the UK’s National Travel Health Network and Centre).

Customs rules

There are strict rules about goods that can be brought into and taken out of Italy. You must declare anything that may be prohibited or subject to tax or duty.

Taking food and drink into the EU

You cannot take meat, milk or products containing them into EU countries. There are some exceptions for medical reasons, for example certain amounts of powdered infant milk, infant food, or pet food needed for medical reasons. Check the rules about taking food and drink into the EU on the European Commission website.

Accommodation and under-18s

Under Italian law, under-18s cannot check into hotels or holiday accommodation without an accompanying adult.

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