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Belgium travel restrictions

COVID-19 Vacc. -197.97%
Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates
Published on 05.01.2022, Air Belgium:

Air Belgium is back in Martinique next Tuesday 10JAN22

Published on 05.01.2022, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines and Wizz Air suspend Brussels-Ljubljana flights from 10JAN22-28FEB22

Published on 22.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Operations resume normally at Brussels Airlines after strike.

Published on 20.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Dozens of Brussels Airlines flights canceled on 20DEC21 because of 24-hour strike.

Published on 17.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines staff to go on strike on Monday.

Published on 16.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines staff will go on 24-hour strike on 20DEC21.

Published on 15.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines plans increased frequencies to New York and Washington

Published on 15.12.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines increases flight offer to Africa for Summer 2022.

Published on 24.11.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines expands network to Conakry and Ouagadougou.

Published on 23.11.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines expands fleet with 9th Airbus A330, rebuilds long-haul fleet growth in the African market.

Published on 19.11.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines unveils new livery, confirms commitment to African network.

Published on 20.10.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Passengers of Brussels Airlines flight to Luanda return to Brussels after last-minute diversion to Kinshasa.

Published on 07.10.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines releases Summer 2022 schedule.

Published on 01.10.2021, Brussels Airlines:

Brussels Airlines announces its winter schedule- with extensive Africa network.

Published on 29.09.2021, TUIfly :

TUIfly Belgium is cancelling flights from Charleroi to Algiers in October.

Published on 27.09.2021, TUIfly :

TUIfly Belgium to launch non-stop flights to Punta Cana, Cancun and Havana, a new destination.

Published on 24.08.2021, Brussles Airlines :

Brussels Airlines sees growth in corporate travel out of Belgium.

Published on 23.08.2021, Brussles Airlines :

Possible strike at end of August as staff at Brussels Airlines file notice

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Belgium
Crossing Rules

Passengers are not allowed to enter until 1 April 2021.
– This does not apply to students.
– This does not apply to passengers entering Belgium to transit by land to a third country. They must prove that they can enter the destination country.
– More exemptions can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/ .

Passengers must have an Essential Journey Certificate issued by a Belgian embassy or consulate.

Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) PCR test result. The test must have been taken at most 72 hours before departure from the first embarkation point. The certificate must be in Dutch, English, French or German.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 6 years.

A completed “Passenger Locator Form” must be submitted at most 48 hours before arrival. The form can be found at https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

Quarantine is possible
Passengers could be subject to Coronavirus (COVID-19) test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ .

Read more
Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 09 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

Close contacts: limitation to a maximum of 3 close contacts per month;
A close contact implies contact closer than 1.5 m without a face mask;
Private gatherings at home: maximum 4 people, maintaining a social distance or with a face mask if social distancing is not possible;
Cafés, canteens and other drinking establishments: maximum 4 people per table, except for family members living under the same roof;
Non-organised outdoor gatherings: maximum 4 people, except for family members living under the same roof;
Closing time cafés: 11 pm;
Additional awareness-raising and enforcement efforts will be implemented to ensure that these measures are applied everywhere;
Working from home is highly recommended, several days per week.

International movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 15 June 2020 to 31 December 2020

You may travel to other countries. There are 3 types of zones.
You are allowed to travel to green zones. They are safe.
It is best not to travel to red or amber zones.

Read more
Flight Restrictions
Published on 26.12.2021

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; -
passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; -
passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers entering Belgium to travel by land to a third country.
They must prove that they can enter the destination country; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before
departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years
if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are
AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - more exemptions can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/

2. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to a Schengen Member State. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of
Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium
to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from
Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda,
Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; -
passengers with an "Essential Journey Certificate" issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter; - passengers with a
COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen,
Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that
the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech
(Comirnaty).

3. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium before 18 March 2020 must have an Essential Travel Certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports
traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

4. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State traveling to stay in Belgium, must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium. - This does not
apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

5. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State, traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa, must have a verbal note or, other proof that
the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

6. Passengers must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not
apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers with a COVID-19
vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna
(Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - passengers younger than 18 years traveling with their vaccinated parents/guardians; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic
passport traveling on duty; - military personnel traveling on duty; - students.

7. Passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy,
Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland must have: - a negative
COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 36 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours
before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or - a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks
before arrival. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); or - a positive COVID-19 PCR test issued at
most 180 days before arrival and a recovery certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from
orange regions of Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain or Sweden .Details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/

8. Passengers must have: - a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 36 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative
COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; -
passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary,
Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or
Switzerland - passengers arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay.

9. Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at most 180 days before arrival at
https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

10. Passengers could be subject to a COVID-19 test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/

11. Passengers are subject to medical screening.

12. Residence permits issued by Italy with an annotation of ?ASILO' are not accepted for entering or transiting through Belgium.

Published on 17.12.2021

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; -
passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; -
passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers entering Belgium to travel by land to a third country.
They must prove that they can enter the destination country; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before
departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years
if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are
AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - more exemptions can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/

2. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter. - This does
not apply to: - nationals and residents of Belgium; - partners or spouses of nationals or residents of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing
that they live in the same household; - children younger than 18 years of nationals of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing that they live in
the same household; - merchant seamen.

3. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to a Schengen Member State. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of
Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium
to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from
Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda,
Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; -
passengers with an "Essential Journey Certificate" issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter; - passengers with a
COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen,
Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that
the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech
(Comirnaty).

4. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium before 18 March 2020 must have an Essential Travel Certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports
traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

5. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State traveling to stay in Belgium, must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium. - This does not
apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

6. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State, traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa, must have a verbal note or, other proof that
the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

7. Passengers must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not
apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers with a COVID-19
vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna
(Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - passengers younger than 18 years traveling with their vaccinated parents/guardians; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic
passport traveling on duty; - military personnel traveling on duty; - students.

8. Passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy,
Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland must have: - a negative
COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 36 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours
before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or - a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks
before arrival. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); or - a positive COVID-19 PCR test issued at
most 180 days before arrival and a recovery certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from
orange regions of Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain or Sweden .Details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/ ; - passengers arriving
from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar,
Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa,
Zambia or Zimbabwe.

9. Passengers must have: - a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 36 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative
COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; -
passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary,
Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or
Switzerland - passengers arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi,
Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe.

10. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a negative COVID-19 PCR
test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers
younger than 12 years.

11. Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at most 180 days before arrival at
https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

12. Passengers could be subject to a COVID-19 test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/

13. Passengers are subject to medical screening.

14. Residence permits issued by Italy with an annotation of ?ASILO' are not accepted for entering or transiting through Belgium.

Published on 13.12.2021

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; -
passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; -
passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers entering Belgium to travel by land to a third country.
They must prove that they can enter the destination country; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before
departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years
if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are
AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - more exemptions can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/

2. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter. - This does
not apply to: - nationals and residents of Belgium; - partners or spouses of nationals or residents of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing
that they live in the same household; - children younger than 18 years of nationals of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing that they live in
the same household; - merchant seamen.

3. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to a Schengen Member State. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of
Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium
to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from
Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda,
Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; -
passengers with an "Essential Journey Certificate" issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter; - passengers with a
COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen,
Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that
the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech
(Comirnaty).

4. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium before 18 March 2020 must have an Essential Travel Certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports
traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

5. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State traveling to stay in Belgium, must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium. - This does not
apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

6. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State, traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa, must have a verbal note or, other proof that
the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

7. Passengers must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not
apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers with a COVID-19
vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna
(Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - passengers younger than 18 years traveling with their vaccinated parents/guardians; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic
passport traveling on duty; - military personnel traveling on duty; - students.

8. Passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy,
Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland must have: - a negative
COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 1 day before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours
before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or - a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks
before arrival. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); or - a positive COVID-19 PCR test issued at
most 180 days before arrival and a recovery certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from
orange regions of Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain or Sweden .Details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/ ; - passengers arriving
from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar,
Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa,
Zambia or Zimbabwe.

9. Passengers must have: - a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 1 day before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative
COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; -
passengers younger than 12 years; - passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary,
Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or
Switzerland - passengers arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi,
Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe.

10. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a negative COVID-19 PCR
test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers
younger than 12 years.

11. Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at most 180 days before arrival at
https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

12. Passengers could be subject to a COVID-19 test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/

13. Passengers are subject to medical screening.

14. Residence permits issued by Italy with an annotation of ?ASILO' are not accepted for entering or transiting through Belgium.

Published on 06.12.2021

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; -
passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; -
passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers entering Belgium to travel by land to a third country.
They must prove that they can enter the destination country; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before
departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years
if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are
AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - more exemptions can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/

2. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter. - This does
not apply to: - nationals and residents of Belgium; - partners or spouses of nationals or residents of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing
that they live in the same household; - children younger than 18 years of nationals of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing that they live in
the same household; - merchant seamen.

3. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to a Schengen Member State. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of
Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium
to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from
Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda,
Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; -
passengers with an "Essential Journey Certificate" issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter; - passengers with a
COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen,
Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that
the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech
(Comirnaty).

4. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium before 18 March 2020 must have an Essential Travel Certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports
traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

5. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State traveling to stay in Belgium, must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium. - This does not
apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

6. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State, traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa, must have a verbal note or, other proof that
the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

7. Passengers must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not
apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR
China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong
Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers with a COVID-19
vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna
(Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - passengers younger than 18 years traveling with their vaccinated parents/guardians; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic
passport traveling on duty; - military personnel traveling on duty; - students.

8. Passengers must have: - a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 1 day before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative
COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or - a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were
fully vaccinated at least two weeks before arrival. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); or - a
positive COVID-19 PCR test issued at most 180 days before arrival and a recovery certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers younger than
12 years; - passengers arriving from Malta, Monaco or Vatican City (Holy See); - passengers arriving from orange regions of Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain or Sweden
.Details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/ ; - passengers arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - passengers
who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe.

9. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a negative COVID-19 PCR
test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers
younger than 12 years.

10. Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at most 180 days before arrival at
https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

11. Passengers could be subject to a COVID-19 test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/

12. Passengers are subject to medical screening.

13. Residence permits issued by Italy with an annotation of ?ASILO' are not accepted for entering or transiting through Belgium.

Published on 29.11.2021

1. Passengers are not allowed to enter. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; -
passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao
(SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or
Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students; - military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers entering Belgium to travel
by land to a third country. They must prove that they can enter the destination country; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully
vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); -
unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks
before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - more exemptions can be found at
https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/

2. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe are not allowed to enter. - This does
not apply to: - nationals and residents of Belgium; - partners or spouses of nationals or residents of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing
that they live in the same household; - children younger than 18 years of nationals of Belgium. They must have an Essential Travel Certificate or a proof showing that they live in
the same household; - merchant seamen.

3. Passengers are not allowed to transit if arriving from a non-Schengen Member State to a Schengen Member State. - This does not apply to: - nationals and residents of
Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State if traveling through Belgium
to the country which issued the visa; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and
Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China),
Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; - merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - students;
- military personnel traveling on duty; - passengers with an "Essential Journey Certificate" issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will
allow them to enter; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are
AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - unvaccinated passengers younger than 18 years if accompanied by a parent with a
COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that the parent was fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield,
Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty).

4. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by Belgium before 18 March 2020 must have an Essential Travel Certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports
traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

5. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State traveling to stay in Belgium, must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium. - This does not
apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

6. Passengers with a "C" visa issued by other Schengen Member State, traveling through Belgium to the country which issued the visa, must have a verbal note or, other proof that
the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not apply to: - passengers with diplomatic passports traveling on duty; - merchant seamen.

7. Passengers must have an Essential Travel Certificate issued by Belgium or a ?note verbale' stating that the country of destination will allow them to enter. - This does not
apply to: - nationals and residents of Switzerland and EEA Member States; - passengers with a "C" visa issued by a Schengen Member State; - passengers with a "D" visa issued by a
Schengen Member State; - residents of Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei, Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao
(SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Uruguay, arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Jordan, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or
Uruguay; - passengers with a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were fully vaccinated at least two weeks before departure. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca
(Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); - passengers younger than 18 years traveling with their vaccinated parents/guardians; -
merchant seamen; - passengers with a diplomatic passport traveling on duty; - military personnel traveling on duty; - students.

8. Passengers must have: - a negative COVID-19 antigen test taken at most 1 day before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or; - a negative
COVID-19 PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German; or - a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing that they were
fully vaccinated at least two weeks before arrival. Vaccines accepted are AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria), Covishield, Janssen, Moderna (Spikevax) and Pfizer-BioNTech (Comirnaty); or - a
positive COVID-19 PCR test issued at most 180 days before arrival and a recovery certificate. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers younger than
12 years; - passengers arriving from Malta, Monaco or Vatican City (Holy See); - passengers arriving from orange regions of Finland, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain or Sweden
.Details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/ ; - passengers arriving from Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Chinese Taipei,
Colombia, Hong Kong (SAR China), Indonesia, Korea (Rep.), Kuwait, Macao (SAR China), Namibia, New Zealand, Peru, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates or Uruguay; -
passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe.

9. Passengers who in the past 14 days have been in Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia or Zimbabwe must have a negative COVID-19 PCR
test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The test result must be in Dutch, English, French or German. - This does not apply to: - passengers residing in Belgium; - passengers
younger than 12 years.

10. Passengers entering or transiting through Belgium must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at most 180 days before arrival at
https://travel.info-coronavirus.be/public-health-passenger-locator-form

11. Passengers could be subject to a COVID-19 test and quarantine; details can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/

12. Passengers are subject to medical screening.

13. Residence permits issued by Italy with an annotation of ?ASILO' are not accepted for entering or transiting through Belgium.

published 28.10.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from EEA Member States or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Australia, Japan, Korea (Rep.), New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, Thailand or Uruguay.
– This does not apply to passengers with a “C” visa issued after 18 March 2020 by Belgium.
– This does not apply to family members of nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.

A completed “Passenger Locator Form” must be submitted at most 48 hours before arrival. The form can be found at travel.info-coronavirus.be

Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation

Entry rules
Entry requirements depend on the color attributed to the country of departure, according to Belgium own national classification of risk areas: green, orange, or red areas.
Children younger than 12 years are exempt from quarantine and testing requirements.

Read more
Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country- subject to vaccine status and origin.

Document checklist:
Passenger Locator Form: all travellers must fill it in within 6 months before entering Belgium.
Important: To determine the quarantine measures, the PLF will take into consideration the areas where you have been in the 14 days before travelling. If the zones have changed colour, measures will apply retroactively.
There is an exception when the person is traveling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area.
COVID certificates – there are three types of certificates:
A vaccination certificate proves that you are fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. You are fully vaccinated if your last injection was at least two weeks ago, and the vaccine is certified by EMA or Covidshield.
A certificate of recovery proves that you have been infected with COVID-10 and have recovered. You have had a positive PCR test less than 180 days old and your isolation period has ended.
A test certificate proves that you have had a negative PCR test. This can be a negative PCR test of maximum 72 hours or a negative antigen test of maximum 36 hours.

Read more
Vaccination
COVID-19 Total Vaccination date: 2022-01-13
COVID-19 Total Vaccination: 23028528
COVID-19 Daily Vaccination: 108945
COVID-19 Vacc. (per 100 citizens, %): 197.97
COVID-19 Daily Vacc. (per 1 million citizens): 9366

THIS COUNTRY IS READY TO CONNECT TO THE EU DIGITAL COVID CERTIFICATE GATEWAY
A vaccination certificate proves that you have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. You are fully vaccinated 2 weeks after your last vaccination dose and if the vaccine is EMA-certified or Covishield. From 1 September, vaccination certificates from non-EU countries will also be accepted in Belgium under certain conditions, pending their equivalence agreement with the EU.

The EU Digital COVID Certificate (available as of 1 July 2021) provides proof that a person has either:
been vaccinated against COVID-19 (vaccine type and manufacturer, number of doses, date of vaccination);
received a negative test result, PCR or rapid antigen, with the name of the test, date and time of test, test centre and result (self-tests are not valid);
recovered from COVID-19 (positive PCR test result valid for 180 days).
When travelling, holders of the EU Digital COVID Certificate will have the same rights as citizens of the visited Member State who have been vaccinated, tested or recovered.

Read more
Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 09 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

All shops are open.
Night shops are open until 10:00 p.m.
Markets are open.
Wear a face mask in shops and at the market. This is mandatory.
Do you own a shop? Read the guide by the FPS Economy with tips to open your shop safely. This guide also contains information for market vendors, hairdressers, beauticians and shopping centres.
Pubs and restaurants are open until 1:00 a.m.
It is best to make a reservation.
You can go to bars or restaurants only with your family (or the people you live with) and your 5 stable contacts.
Stay seated at the table.
You must wear a face mask. This is mandatory. If you are sitting down at a table, you do not need to wear a face mask.
You must leave your contact details.

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 09 October 2020 to 31 August 2020

All locations have reopened, e.g. libraries, theme parks, indoor playgrounds and casinos.
For official events, such as village fetes, sports competitions or cultural exhibitions, there will be a maximum number of people allowed to attend.
a maximum of 200 people inside and 400 people outside.
Each organisation has specific rules. Check the website
You must wear a face mask (from the age of 12). This is mandatory in the following places:
shops and shopping malls,
shopping streets,
crowded places,
markets,
public transport,
libraries,
cinemas,
museums,
theatres, concert halls and conference halls,
auditoria,
fairgrounds
religious buildings
You need to give your contact info when you go to:
wellness centres
sports lessons in a club
swimming pools
casinos
party and reception rooms

What is not yet allowed?

Discotheques or night clubs are not yet allowed to reopen.
Big events (such as festivals) are not allowed.

Sport

If you are part of a sports club you are allowed to exercise together with a maximum of 50 people.
You can exercise in a fitness club, sports club or swimming pool.
You can visit a sauna or wellness centre. Publicly accessible jacuzzis, hammams and steam rooms remain closed.

Religion

Worship services are allowed.
A maximum of 200 people may attend.
Physical contact is not allowed.
You must wear a face mask (from the age of 12 years).

Read more
Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 01 July 2020 to 31 December 2020

Lessons will resume gradually as from 18 May. Not all students will go back to school immediately.
Each community will be responsible for executing this decision in its own territory, in consultation with the education sector.
During this phase, schools will gradually reopen for some primary and secondary pupils, under strict organisational conditions. Pre-schools will remain closed at this stage and higher education has already planned through to the end of the academic year in cooperation with the community authorities
As far as the longer-term prospects are concerned, preparations for the start of the new school year are already in full swing. The Ministers of Education, in collaboration with the GEES experts, have drawn up a colour-coded system that indicates how schools should organise themselves on the basis of the health situation. The Ministers of Education will explain this plan in more detail during a press conference.

Read more
Other

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD

Full Restrictions

  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) in French and English are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Arriving in Belgium
    General information
    National Health Institute

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    YES

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to their destination.

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    Entry requirements depend on the color attributed to the country of departure, according to Belgium own national classification of risk areas: green, orange, or red areas.

    Children younger than 12 years are exempt from quarantine and testing requirements.

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. Passenger Locator Form: all travellers must fill it in within 6 months before entering Belgium.
      • Important: To determine the quarantine measures, the PLF will take into consideration the areas where you have been in the 14 days before travelling. If the zones have changed colour, measures will apply retroactively.
      • There is an exception when the person is traveling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area.
    2. COVID certificates – there are three types of certificates:
      • A vaccination certificate proves that you are fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. You are fully vaccinated if your last injection was at least two weeks ago, and the vaccine is certified by EMA or Covidshield.
      • A certificate of recovery proves that you have been infected with COVID-10 and have recovered. You have had a positive PCR test less than 180 days old and your isolation period has ended.
      • A test certificate proves that you have had a negative PCR test. This can be a negative PCR test of maximum 72 hours or a negative antigen test of maximum 36 hours.

    Learn more:

    General information
    National Health Institute

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 6 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • cultural and events venues, including in museums, cinemas, theatres and concert halls
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    Shops remain open but need to adhere to a ‘one customer per square metre’ rule. Customers will only be permitted to shop with one other person (not including minors).
    Outdoor activities (including Christmas markets) remain open but are subject to restricted capacity. The public will not be permitted to attend sports events, but these events are permitted to continue without spectators.
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other permitted indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated with an NHS vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes have to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    12.01.2022
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) in French and English are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Arriving in Belgium
    General information
    National Health Institute

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    YES

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to their destination.

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Entry rules

    Entry requirements depend on the color attributed to the country of departure, according to Belgium own national classification of risk areas: green, orange, or red areas.

    Children younger than 12 years are exempt from quarantine and testing requirements.

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. Passenger Locator Form: all travellers must fill it in within 6 months before entering Belgium.
      • Important: To determine the quarantine measures, the PLF will take into consideration the areas where you have been in the 14 days before travelling. If the zones have changed colour, measures will apply retroactively.
      • There is an exception when the person is traveling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area.
    2. COVID certificates – there are three types of certificates:
      • A vaccination certificate proves that you are fully vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus. You are fully vaccinated if your last injection was at least two weeks ago, and the vaccine is certified by EMA or Covidshield.
      • A certificate of recovery proves that you have been infected with COVID-10 and have recovered. You have had a positive PCR test less than 180 days old and your isolation period has ended.
      • A test certificate proves that you have had a negative PCR test. This can be a negative PCR test of maximum 72 hours or a negative antigen test of maximum 36 hours.

    Learn more:

    General information
    National Health Institute

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 6 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • cultural and events venues, including in museums, cinemas, theatres and concert halls
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    Shops remain open but need to adhere to a ‘one customer per square metre’ rule. Customers will only be permitted to shop with one other person (not including minors).
    Outdoor activities (including Christmas markets) remain open but are subject to restricted capacity. The public will not be permitted to attend sports events, but these events are permitted to continue without spectators.
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other permitted indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated with an NHS vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes have to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    11.01.2022
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ (EUDCC) in French and English are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    Learn more:

    Arriving in Belgium
    General information
    National Health Institute

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 6 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • cultural and events venues, including in museums, cinemas, theatres and concert halls
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    Shops remain open but need to adhere to a ‘one customer per square metre’ rule. Customers will only be permitted to shop with one other person (not including minors).
    Outdoor activities (including Christmas markets) remain open but are subject to restricted capacity. The public will not be permitted to attend sports events, but these events are permitted to continue without spectators.
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other permitted indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated with an NHS vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes have to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    07.01.2022
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 6 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • cultural and events venues, including in museums, cinemas, theatres and concert halls
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    Shops remain open but need to adhere to a ‘one customer per square metre’ rule. Customers will only be permitted to shop with one other person (not including minors).
    Outdoor activities (including Christmas markets) remain open but are subject to restricted capacity. The public will not be permitted to attend sports events, but these events are permitted to continue without spectators.
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other permitted indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated with an NHS vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes have to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    30.12.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 6 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    From 26 December, the following additional measures will apply:
    • All indoor activities and events (including in cinemas, theatres and concert halls) will be prohibited. Indoor sports events, marriages and funerals can continue to take place. Museums and libraries can will remain open
    • The public will not be permitted to attend sports events, but these events will be permitted to continue without spectators
    • Outdoor activities (including Christmas markets) will remain open but will be subject to restricted capacity
    • Shops will remain open but will need to adhere to a ‘one customer per square metre’ rule. Customers will only be permitted to shop with one other person (not including minors)
    • Bars and restaurants are permitted to remain open but customers will continue to be subject to entry requirements
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other permitted indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated with an NHS vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes have to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    23.12.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 10 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum of six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated require a presentation of a vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes are required to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    21.12.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 10 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum of six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated require a presentation of a vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes are required to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    02.12.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Belgian authorities will ease entry rules for U.K. nationals from 26 November (SVI, 24.11.2021). Authorities accept recent rapid antigen test for travel (SVI, 10.11.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces for those above 10 years old:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces and events, you will be required to demonstrate your COVID safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. In addition to the use of CST, masks will have to be worn in restaurants and bars when not sat at a table. A maximum of six people can sit at a table. Those vaccinated require a presentation of a vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access. All nightclubs are closed. Bars, restaurants and cafes are required to close at 11pm.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    29.11.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Belgian authorities will ease entry rules for U.K. nationals from 26 November (SVI, 24.11.2021). Authorities accept recent rapid antigen test for travel (SVI, 10.11.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces, you will be required to demonstrate your Covid safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors in Flanders. In Brussels and Wallonia, the limits are 50 people indoors and 200 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can only take place if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST).
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the
    Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    26.11.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Authorities accept recent rapid antigen test for travel (SVI, 10.11.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green“, “orange“, “red and very high-risk zones. Belgium’s classification isupdated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

    ALSO: Travellers can access Belgium if they fill in the Passenger Location Form (PLF) within 6 months before their arrival in Belgium, even if they are fully vaccinated.

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Important: Check your Belgium national COVID certificate at  www.covidsafe.be to be able to access specific places (restaurants, theatres etc ) without any restriction.

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Arriving in Belgium
    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces, you will be required to demonstrate your Covid safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors in Flanders. In Brussels and Wallonia, the limits are 50 people indoors and 200 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can only take place if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST).
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the
    Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    22.11.2021
  • Belgium Travellers who hold a recent rapid antigen test can now travel to Belgium without being subject to additional rules such as self-isolation requirements since the latter’s authorities now accept this type of test as valid proof for entry.

    “Testing in the context of travelling can be a PCR test or a RAT (Rapid Antigen Test). A PCR test is valid for 72 hours. A RAT test is valid the day of testing and the day after testing,” the statement of the Belgian authorities reads.

    The decision of the Belgian authorities to recognise rapid antigen tests was welcomed by the International Air Transport Association, who said that passengers will now be able to take more cost-efficient trips while following COVID-19 safety rules.

    “Great news that Belgium now accepts Rapid Antigen Tests for travel! This means cheaper, easier passenger trips while still safeguarding COVID-19 risk. This will be a big support for international travel to & from Belgium & energise economic recovery from the pandemic,” IATA wrote on its official Twitter account.

    Following the new changes, unvaccinated and unrecovered travellers who plan to visit Belgium will be permitted entry as long as they present a rapid antigen test that has been taken recently, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    Nonetheless, since Belgium has its own colour-coded system, different rules apply depending on the country of origin a person is travelling from.

    Travellers reaching Belgium from an EU/Schengen Area country that is currently placed on its green or orange list are not subject to any additional restrictions as long as they hold a negative test result.

    On the other hand, travellers from a red-listed country who hold a rapid antigen test need to get tested again on day seven after entering Belgium.

    Except for those who hold a recent rapid antigen test result, Belgium already permits entry to all those who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 as well as those who have recovered from the virus.

    Vaccinated and recovered travellers don’t need to follow testing or self-isolation rules, regardless of the country they are travelling from.

    Read more
    11.11.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Authorities accept recent rapid antigen test for travel (SVI, 10.11.2021)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces, you will be required to demonstrate your Covid safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors in Flanders. In Brussels and Wallonia, the limits are 50 people indoors and 200 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can only take place if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST).
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the
    Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    10.11.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. It is mandatory to wear face masks in the following indoor spaces:
    • stores and shopping centres
    • care establishments
    • publicly accessible areas in businesses, companies, public buildings, courthouse buildings
    • venues for cultural and recreational activities, sports and other events, including theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums, indoor amusement and theme parks, indoor gyms and sports facilities
    • libraries, game/toy libraries and media libraries
    • places of worship
    • healthcare facilities, hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers
    • public transport, including at stations and airports
    To enter into bars, restaurants, cafes, fitness centres and many other indoor spaces, you will be required to demonstrate your Covid safe status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system showing proof of vaccination, recent negative test or recovery certificate. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their vaccination certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors in Flanders. In Brussels and Wallonia, the limits are 50 people indoors and 200 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can only take place if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST).
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also some regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and the
    Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    28.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as ‘green’, ‘orange’, ‘red’ or ‘very high-risk’ zone, and different measures apply.

    Non-EU countries are considered to be ‘red zones’, unless they are included in the Council’s list of countries* for which COVID-19 travel restrictions should be lifted (Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020). This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered ‘red’ by Belgium. These are Singapore and Ukraine. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information, check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU ‘red zones’ is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone’ (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a ‘red zone’ outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as ‘very high-risk’ zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU ‘very high-risk’ zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a ‘very high-risk’ zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of ‘travels for essential reasons’. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from ‘very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19, including the wearing of face masks on public transport, at stations and airports, in healthcare facilities and at hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers. Nightclubs are now allowed to open. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your Covid free status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system. This allows entry on the basis of a vaccination certificate with a QR code that is recognised by Belgium, including the COVID Pass.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also currently significant regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    Brussels: In Brussels there are a number of additional measures:
    • Masks remain mandatory inside shops and many other enclosed spaces.
    From 15 October, persons going to restaurants, bars, cafés, museums and galleries must demonstrate their COVID-free status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, which allows entry on the basis of a vaccination certificate with a QR code that is recognised by Belgium, including the COVID Pass. The CST system is not required for the use of outdoor terraces or for the collection of take-away food.
    • The CST system will also be in use for events with more than 50 people indoors or 200 people outdoors.
    • Tables in restaurants, bars and cafés are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    *Flanders: Most restrictions in Flanders, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination.
    *Wallonia: Wallonia is due to introduce similar measures to Brussels regarding the use of the Covid Safe Ticket by the end of October, although there may be regional variations. You should continue to follow the guidance for your local area.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    22.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (currently those are Australia, Canada, Chile, China*, Hong Kong, Jordan, Kuwait,  Macao, Macedonia, New Zealand, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore*, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, Uruguay, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: China, Singapore. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19, including the wearing of face masks on public transport, at stations and airports, in healthcare facilities and at hairdressers, nail salons and other contact service providers. Nightclubs are now allowed to open. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your Covid free status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system. This allows entry on the basis of a vaccination certificate with a QR code that is recognised by Belgium, including the COVID Pass.
    These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. There are also currently significant regional differences in the implementation of measures. You should regularly check the website of the relevant city or town and the Belgian government advice website for the latest detailed information.
    Brussels: In Brussels there are a number of additional measures:
    • Masks remain mandatory inside shops and many other enclosed spaces.
    From 15 October, persons going to restaurants, bars, cafés, museums and galleries must demonstrate their COVID-free status through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, which allows entry on the basis of a vaccination certificate with a QR code that is recognised by Belgium, including the COVID Pass. The CST system is not required for the use of outdoor terraces or for the collection of take-away food.
    • The CST system will also be in use for events with more than 50 people indoors or 200 people outdoors.
    • Tables in restaurants, bars and cafés are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    *Flanders: Most restrictions in Flanders, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed.
    Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination.
    *Wallonia: Wallonia is due to introduce similar measures to Brussels regarding the use of the Covid Safe Ticket by the end of October, although there may be regional variations. You should continue to follow the guidance for your local area.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    14.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (currently those are Australia, Canada, Chile, China*, Hong Kong, Jordan, Kuwait,  Macao, Macedonia, New Zealand, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore*, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, Uruguay, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: China, Singapore. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by theBelgian government on their website .
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, at stations and airports, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian government (in English).
    Nightclubs are now permitted to reopen; proof of vaccination status is required for those attending. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your COVID free status either through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium.
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    In the Flanders region only, the requirement to wear a mask is limited to public transport, in the medical and non-medical contact professions, at airports, at healthcare facilities, and for events that are not using the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Some events venues may require those attending to prove their COVID free status through the Covid Safe Ticket system, a Belgian, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium such as a NHS COVID Pass or vaccination certificate with a QR code.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.found on the Belgian government’s website under ‘What should I do?’)

    Read more
    07.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (currently those are Australia, Canada, Chile, China*, Hong Kong, Jordan, Kuwait,  Macao, Macedonia, New Zealand, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Singapore*, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, Uruguay, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: China, Singapore. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by theBelgian government on their website .
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, at stations and airports, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian government (in English).
    Nightclubs are now permitted to reopen; proof of vaccination status is required for those attending. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your COVID free status either through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium.
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    In the Flanders region only, the requirement to wear a mask is limited to public transport, in the medical and non-medical contact professions, at airports, at healthcare facilities, and for events that are not using the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Some events venues may require those attending to prove their COVID free status through the Covid Safe Ticket system, a Belgian, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium such as a NHS COVID Pass or vaccination certificate with a QR code.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.found on the Belgian government’s website under ‘What should I do?’)

    Read more
    05.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania*, Armenia*, Australia, Azerbaijan*, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam*, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan*, Jordan,  Kosovo, Lebanon, Macao, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia*, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan,  Ukraine, USA, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: Azerbaijan, Albania, Japan, Serbia, Armenia, Brunei Darussalam. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    Brussels Region applies stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by theBelgian government on their website .
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, at stations and airports, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian government (in English).
    Nightclubs are now permitted to reopen; proof of vaccination status is required for those attending. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your COVID free status either through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium.
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    In the Flanders region only, the requirement to wear a mask is limited to public transport, in the medical and non-medical contact professions, at airports, at healthcare facilities, and for events that are not using the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Some events venues may require those attending to prove their COVID free status through the Covid Safe Ticket system, a Belgian, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium such as a NHS COVID Pass or vaccination certificate with a QR code.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.found on the Belgian government’s website under ‘What should I do?’)

    Read more
    04.10.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania*, Armenia*, Australia, Azerbaijan*, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam*, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan*, Jordan,  Kosovo, Lebanon, Macao, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia*, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan,  Ukraine, USA, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: Azerbaijan, Albania, Japan, Serbia, Armenia, Brunei Darussalam. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    As of 17 September, Brussels Region will apply stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by theBelgian government on their website .
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, at stations and airports, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian government (in English).
    Nightclubs are now permitted to reopen; proof of vaccination status is required for those attending. In order to enter, you must demonstrate your COVID free status either through the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium.
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket system (CST) as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated with an vaccine (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    In the Flanders region only, the requirement to wear a mask is limited to public transport, in the medical and non-medical contact professions, at airports, at healthcare facilities, and for events that are not using the Belgian Covid Safe Ticket (CST) system.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Some events venues may require those attending to prove their COVID free status through the Covid Safe Ticket system, a Belgian, EU Digital COVID Certificate or an equivalent recognised by Belgium such as a NHS COVID Pass or vaccination certificate with a QR code.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.found on the Belgian government’s website under ‘What should I do?’)

    Read more
    01.10.2021
  • Belgium The Belgian authorities have announced on Tuesday, September 28, that travellers under the age of 18 who arrive in Belgium from a country outside the European Union or Schengen Area will now be permitted entry regardless of their vaccination status.

    However, it has been emphasised that all travellers who fall under this group should be accompanied by another person who holds a valid vaccination certificate in order to be permitted to enter Belgium without having to present proof of vaccination, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “Since the age of vaccination varies from country to country, it is now explicitly provided that persons up to the age of 17, without a vaccination certificate, can travel with an accompanying person who is in possession of a vaccination certificate,” the ministerial decree issued by the Minister of Interior Annelies Verlinden reads.

    Even though travellers under 18 have been exempted from the vaccination certificate requirement, the decree highlighted that minors over the age of 12 are still required to possess a negative test result or a recovery certificate.

    “From the age of 12, however, those minors must be in possession of a test or recovery certificate,” the decree noted.

    In contrast, in line with the data provided by the press release issued by the Minister of Interior, children under the age of 12 do not need to present any of the above-mentioned documents.

    Even though several changes have been mentioned in the decree, third-country nationals will continue to be allowed entry to Belgium as long as they meet all the entry requirements and provide a vaccination certificate.

    In addition, it was noted that starting from this Friday, October 1, it will no longer be possible to present a paper format of the passenger locator form (PLF), meaning that travellers will be required to complete the form electronically. Nonetheless, it will still be possible to print the QR code that is received after filling the form in.

    “A certain number of framework measures will be provided for, such as, for example, assistance to passengers by the carrier to complete the electronic PLF and/or print the QR code, as well as a transition period of 14 days,” the decree highlighted, regarding the PLF rules.

    Apart from all the rules mentioned above, starting from October 1, all persons over the age of 12 will be required to wear a mask when attending certain closed areas and collective transport.

    Read more
    30.09.2021
  • Belgium TUIfly

    27.09.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania*, Armenia*, Australia, Azerbaijan*, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam*, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan*, Jordan,  Kosovo, Lebanon, Macao, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia*, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan,  Ukraine, USA, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: Azerbaijan, Albania, Japan, Serbia, Armenia, Brunei Darussalam. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    As of 17 September, Brussels Region will apply stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Nightclubs will be able to reopen on 1 October. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the CovidSafe.be app as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated in England, Wales and Northern Ireland only will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website

    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government
    website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    20.09.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a test certificate prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must present a test certificate before arrival, or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents (in this case, a quarantine must be observed while waiting for the results). If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed.  More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test certificate before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania*, Armenia*, Australia, Azerbaijan*, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam*, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan*, Jordan,  Kosovo, Lebanon, Macao, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia*, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan,  Ukraine, USA, for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    * Some of the countries listed in the Annex I are considered “red” by Belgium. These are: Azerbaijan, Albania, Japan, Serbia, Armenia, Brunei Darussalam. Non-essential travel to Belgium from these third countries is still allowed, but travellers must respect the following measures: all travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine. A second test must be taken on day 7. If any of these tests is positive, a quarantine of 10 days must be observed. 

    As of 17 September, Brussels Region will apply stricter rules: all travellers coming from a red area and not holding a EUDCC must, in addition to the tests obligations, respect a mandatory quarantine of 10 days. The quarantine can be shorted if the result of the test taken on day 7 after arrival is negative.

    For more information check:  https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/redcountrieswhitelist/)

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative test certificate. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A negative test certificate or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. 

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Nightclubs will be able to reopen on 1 October. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the CovidSafe.be app as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated in England, Wales and Northern Ireland only will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website

    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government
    website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    15.09.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents, as well as on day 7, and quarantine while waiting for the result.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk” zone, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macao, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity), for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted. This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ”red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, an entry ban applies to non-EU countries classified as “very high-risk” zones. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel to Belgium only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a non-EU “very high-risk” zone – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantineandPCR test on day 1 and day 7from entry. People without a valid EUDCC certificate must present a negative PCR test result of less than 72 hours. This applies also if the stay in the country has been of less than 48h.

    Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be).

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

     

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Nightclubs will be able to reopen on 1 October. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the CovidSafe.be app as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated in England, Wales and Northern Ireland only will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website

    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government
    website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    03.09.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents, as well as on day 7, and quarantine while waiting for the result.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Katar, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Ukraine, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity), for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted. This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign, which differs between regions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    *General Measures: You must respect the rules on 1.5m social distancing requirements at all times. It is mandatory to wear a mask in many indoor public places, including on public transport, in shops and shopping centres, when moving around restaurants and bars, and in places of worship. It is mandatory to wear a mask in busy shopping streets and markets. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    *Flanders and Wallonia: Most restrictions in Flanders and Wallonia, including limits on social gatherings and in the hospitality sector, have been removed. Nightclubs will be able to reopen on 1 October. Events can take place without restrictions with up to 200 people indoors and 400 people outdoors. Over these limits, an event can take place without restrictions if facilitated by the CovidSafe.be app as proof of vaccination. Those vaccinated in England, Wales and Northern Ireland only will be able to present their certificate with QR code as proof of vaccination in order to gain access.
    *Brussels: There are a number of additional measures in place in the Brussels-Capital Region, including:
    • Indoor gatherings at home or in private tourist accommodation are limited to eight people (not including children under 12).
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars are open but with table service only. Tables are limited to eight people, unless all people are from the same household group.
    • Religious and civil ceremonies, private parties, and cultural and other events can take place but with limits on numbers, social distancing and mask wearing requirements.
    • Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains strongly recommended.
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website

    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government
    website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    01.09.2021
  • Belgium Belgian health authorities have decided to lift several restrictions from September 1, as the country is close to meeting the goal of 70 per cent of the population being vaccinated in all municipalities.

    Following the news shared in a press release, tourists travelling to Belgium will be able to attend numerous events and activities, such as private gatherings, parties and organized activities with no curfew or capacity restriction imposed.

    Furthermore, travellers visiting bars and restaurants will no longer be limited to strict opening and closing hours and no distance between tables have to be applied. However, the serving personnel are obliged to continue wearing a face mask, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    But travellers will be able to attend nightclubs and dance halls only after October 1.

    Moreover, tourists visiting Belgium will be able to attend indoor events with less than 200 participants or outdoor events with less than 400 attendees, which from October 1, is set to be raised to 500 attendees. However, travellers won’t be able to visit the Brussels-Capital Region, as the region will not be relaxing restrictions to that point.

    >>Rules for Travelling to Belgium During Summer 2021

    Tourists will be free from wearing a mask requirement from September 1, unless they are visiting an indoor event with more than 200 spectators or an outdoors event with 400 attendees.

    Read more
    27.08.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of “green”, “orange”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country.

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days, without being classified as “very high-risk” zone, before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red zone”, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents, as well as on day 7, and quarantine while waiting for the result.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:

    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red zones”, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Katar, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, New Zealand, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Ukraine, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity), for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted. This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    A household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits. Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bars are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group).
    Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government
    (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19: you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.
    Plan ahead and make sure you: can access money; understand what your insurance will cover; make arrangements to quarantine at your hotel or the place you were staying (rules for what you can and cannot do during quarantine are found on the Belgian Government’s website under ‘What should I do?’); can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

    Read more
    17.08.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of very “green”, “yellow”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification. 

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days without being classified as “very high-risk” zone before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones and “very high-risk” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red” zone, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. Belgian residents can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival for Belgian residents, as well as on day 7.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern)  outside EU and Schengen associated countries- even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Montenegro, New Zealand, Katar, Moldova, Macedonia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity),  for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/. In this case, the following stricter measures apply before and upon arrival in Belgium:

    • Before arrival in Belgium, a Passenger Locator Form (PLF) must always be filled-in.
    • For non-residents, either a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate (or one deemed equivalent by the European Commission or Belgium) is required. A 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on  day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.
    • For Belgians and belgian residents, a 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a non-EU “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine.

    Travellers who have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after arrival. If the result is negative, the quarantine can end. Travellers who do not have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Authorized travellers from “very high-risk” zones must quarantine for 10 days. Belgians and Belgian residents must be tested on day 1 and day 7 after arrival; non-residents must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival, and be tested on day 7. 

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    A household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits. Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bars are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group).
    Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government
    (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *Be prepared for your plans to change: No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.
    If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.
    Plan ahead and make sure you: can access money; understand what your insurance will cover; make arrangements to quarantine at your hotel or the place you were staying (rules for what you can and cannot do during quarantine are found on the Belgian Government’s website under ‘What should I do?’); can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

    Read more
    05.08.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of very “green”, “yellow”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code red, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification. 

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red” zone, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. If they do not have a pre-departure negative PCR test, they can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must quarantine for 10 days and get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival, as well as on day 7. If the second test is negative, the quarantine period can be lifted.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern)  – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Montenegro, New Zealand, Katar, Moldova, Macedonia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity),  for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/. In this case, the following stricter measures apply before and upon arrival in Belgium:

    • Before arrival in Belgium, a Passenger Locator Form (PLF) must always be filled-in.
    • For non-residents, either a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate (or one deemed equivalent by the European Commission or Belgium) is required. A 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on  day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.
    • For Belgians and belgian residents, a 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a non-EU “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine.

    Travellers who have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after arrival. If the result is negative, the quarantine can end. Travellers who do not have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Authorized travellers from “very high-risk” zones must quarantine for 10 days. Belgians and Belgian residents must be tested on day 1 and day 7 after arrival; non-residents must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival, and be tested on day 7. 

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    A household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits. Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bars are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group).
    Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government
    (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.
    *Be prepared for your plans to change: No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.
    If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. Belgian authorities are likely to conduct calls to check you are quarantining. You may also need to seek treatment there.
    Plan ahead and make sure you: can access money; understand what your insurance will cover; make arrangements to quarantine at your hotel or the place you were staying (rules for what you can and cannot do during quarantine are found on the Belgian Government’s website under ‘What should I do?’); can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

    Read more
    30.07.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of very “green”, “yellow”, “red” and “very high-risk” zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code red, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply. From 19 July 2021 stricter rules can apply to travellers coming from EU and Schengen associated countries characterised by high rates of variants of concern, regardless of the colour classification. 

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red” zone, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. If they do not have a pre-departure negative PCR test, they can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    When arriving from an EU or Schengen associated country with high rates of variants of concern, regardless of their colour classification, people who have not been fully vaccinated for at least 2 weeks must quarantine for 10 days and get a PCR test either within 72 hours before arrival or on day 1 after the arrival, as well as on day 7. If the second test is negative, the quarantine period can be lifted.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern)  – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Montenegro, New Zealand, Katar, Moldova, Macedonia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity),  for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/. In this case, the following stricter measures apply before and upon arrival in Belgium:

    • Before arrival in Belgium, a Passenger Locator Form (PLF) must always be filled-in.
    • For non-residents, either a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate (or one deemed equivalent by the European Commission or Belgium) is required. A 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on  day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.
    • For Belgians and belgian residents, a 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a non-EU “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine.

    Travellers who have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after arrival. If the result is negative, the quarantine can end. Travellers who do not have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Authorized travellers from “very high-risk” zones must quarantine for 10 days. Belgians and Belgian residents must be tested on day 1 and day 7 after arrival; non-residents must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival, and be tested on day 7. 

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in Belgium: Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    From 27 June 2021, a household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group). Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    21.07.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of very high, high, medium and low-risk zones. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. In addition to the colour code red, countries of origin may also be classified as “very high-risk” zones, to which additional stricter measures apply.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones.

     

    Are a coronavirus test or quarantine required?

    All travellers from an EU “red” zone, who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate, must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. If they do not have a pre-departure negative PCR test, they can get tested on day 1 or 2 after the arrival in Belgium and must undergo a quarantine while waiting for the result. If the test is negative, they can end the quarantine.

    Belgians and Belgian residents travelling from a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern)  – even if holding a valid EUDCC and fully vaccinated – are subject to a mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    Non-nationals and non-residents of Belgium, who have stayed in a “very high-risk” zone (with variants of concern) in the last 14 days – even if holding a valid EUDCC – can enter Belgium only in the case of “travels for essential reasons”. A pre-departure negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate are required. A mandatory 10-day quarantine and PCR test on day 1 and day 7 from entry will also apply. If the second test is negative, the quarantine is lifted.

    More information on inbound travel exemptions because of the “essential reasons” is available at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by air

    Travellers who only transit by air and who only enter the transit zone are not required to present a negative test. However, these travellers are required to show a negative test result before arriving in Belgium if this is needed to travel on to the final destination. 

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required. The same applies also to cross-border workers. For people arriving in Belgium with their own vehicle, random checks may be carried out at the borders.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to countries outside the European Union and the Schengen Area is strongly discouraged. Depending on the epidemiological situation, the country or zone of origin is classified as “green”, “orange”, “red” or “very high-risk”, and different measures apply.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, unless they are listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Albania, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Hong Kong, Israël, Japan, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Macau, Montenegro, New Zealand, Katar, Moldova, Macedonia, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, USA, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity),  for which the travel restrictions have temporarily been lifted.  This list is updated every two weeks by the Council of the EU. 

    For more information, please check: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/colour-codes-by-country/.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium from non-EU “red zones” is prohibited for people who are neither nationals of the EU, nor of a country that is part of the Schengen Area, and who have their primary residence in a non-EU ‘red zone” (third countries not listed in Annex I to Council Recommendation), except for fully vaccinated individuals with a recognised vaccination certificate as from 1 July 2021.

    Authorised travellers from a “red zone” outside the European Union who can present a recognised European or Belgian certificate of vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after their arrival in Belgium. If the result is negative the quarantine is lifted. This does not apply to children under the age of 12. Authorised travellers who do not have a vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on days 1 and 7 after their arrival.

    More information on essential travels on: www.info-coronavirus.be – FAQ

    In addition, some countries are classified as “very high-risk”, and an entry ban applies. People who have been in these countries during the past 14 days can travel only if they meet one of the exceptions listed on www.info-coronavirus.be/en/countries-with-high-risk/. In this case, the following stricter measures apply before and upon arrival in Belgium:

    • Before arrival in Belgium, a Passenger Locator Form (PLF) must always be filled-in.
    • For non-residents, either a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival or an EU Digital COVID Certificate (or one deemed equivalent by the European Commission or Belgium) is required. A 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on  day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.
    • For Belgians and belgian residents, a 10-day quarantine is required as well as a PCR test on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Finally, as from 28 April 2021, people who were in Brazil, South Africa or India at any time during the past 14 days, are prohibited to travel directly or indirectly to Belgium, provided that they do not have Belgian nationality or do not have their main residence in Belgium, with the exception of essential journeys. (www.info-coronavirus.be)

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a non-EU “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine.

    Travellers who have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must get tested on day 1 or day 2 after arrival. If the result is negative, the quarantine can end. Travellers who do not have a recognized European or Belgian vaccination or recovery certificate must quarantine for 10 days and get tested on day 1 and day 7 of the mandatory quarantine. Some countries of origin are exempt from the quarantine obligation, see https://www.info-coronavirus.be for further details.

    Authorized travellers from “very high-risk” zones must quarantine for 10 days. Belgians and Belgian residents must be tested on day 1 and day 7 after arrival; non-residents must present a pre-departure negative PCR test taken less than 72 hours prior to arrival, and be tested on day 7. 

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by specific travel means and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. Persons who travel to Belgium by boat or plane are always obliged to fill in the Passenger Locator Form. The same applies to people who travel to Belgium by train or bus from outside the EU or Schengen area. This exception does not apply to travellers from “very high-riskzones, who are always required to fill-in the form. 

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in Belgium: Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    From 27 June 2021, a household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group). Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    09.07.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children under 12 years old are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine. Travellers arriving from a red zone by air or sea must always complete a 10-day quarantine, regardless of the length of their stay.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    People travelling from South Africa, Brazil and India must always complete a PLF.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens or residents.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of third countries listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Australia, Israël, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand).

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Stricter rules apply if you have visited one of these countries in the last 14 days: Brazil, India, South Africa. More information can be found at info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. This does not apply to travellers returning from South Africa, India, South America or the UK. The quarantine lasts 10 days, but can be shortened with a negative PCR test on day 7. Residents in Belgium must also be tested on day 1 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or traveling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is traveling by other means than the carrier and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control. These exemptions from completing the PLF do not apply to people who have been in South Africa, Brazil and India at any time during the 14 days prior to their arrival in Belgium. People traveling from these countries must always complete a PLF.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in Belgium: Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    From 27 June 2021, a household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group). Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    05.07.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: COVID-19 entry ban into Belgium from 24 countries comes into effect (Brussels Times, 26.06.2021). Government starts issuing EU COVID-19 passports for travel; quarantine abolished for ‘green’ and ‘orange’ countries (SVI, 07.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    The country or region has to be classified “orange” or “green” for at least 14 days before being exempted from the requirements applied to “red” zones.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children under 12 years old are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine. Travellers arriving from a red zone by air or sea must always complete a 10-day quarantine, regardless of the length of their stay.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    People travelling from South Africa, Brazil and India must always complete a PLF.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens or residents.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of third countries listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Australia, Israël, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand).

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Stricter rules apply if you have visited one of these countries in the last 14 days: Brazil, India, South Africa. More information can be found at info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. This does not apply to travellers returning from South Africa, India, South America or the UK. The quarantine lasts 10 days, but can be shortened with a negative PCR test on day 7. Residents in Belgium must also be tested on day 1 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or traveling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is traveling by other means than the carrier and staying less than 48 hours abroad, or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control. These exemptions from completing the PLF do not apply to people who have been in South Africa, Brazil and India at any time during the 14 days prior to their arrival in Belgium. People traveling from these countries must always complete a PLF.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in Belgium: Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    The Belgian Government has announced a plan for gradual relaxation of restrictive measures over the summer. Relaxations are linked to the easing pressure on hospitals and progress of the vaccination campaign. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    From 27 June 2021, a household may receive up to eight people indoors at the same time. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open. Tables are limited to eight people (unless all people are from the same household group). Schools are open. Teleworking is no longer mandatory, but remains recommended.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Indoor cultural and other events can take place with limitations on numbers and social distancing measures. Places of worship are open and services can take place. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    29.06.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine. Travellers arriving from a red zone by air or sea must always complete a 10-day quarantine, regardless of the length of their stay.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Transit by land

    From within the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air or boat, no PCR test is required.

    From outside the EU+ area, if you will be spending less than 48 hours in Belgium and if you are not travelling by air, boat, train or bus, no PCR test is required.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens or residents.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of third countries listed in Annex I of Council Recommendation (EU) 2020/912 of 30 June 2020 (Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Israël).

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. Quarantine lasts 10 days, but can be shortened with a negative PCR test on day 7. Residents in Belgium must also be tested on day 1 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than carrier and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    Up to ten people are allowed to meet together outdoors, except between the hours of midnight and 5am when this is limited to three people (unless from the same household group). A household may receive two people indoors at the same time, provided that these people belong to the same household. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open for outdoor service only between the hours of 8am and 10pm. Tables are limited to four people (unless all people are from the same household group). A takeaway service is permitted.
    Schools are open. Teleworking is mandatory. Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other indoor cultural venues and sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Outdoor cultural and other events can take place with a maximum of 50 people. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information. Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    21.05.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    Up to ten people are allowed to meet together outdoors, except between the hours of midnight and 5am when this is limited to three people (unless from the same household group). A household may receive two people indoors at the same time, provided that these people belong to the same household. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open for outdoor service only between the hours of 8am and 10pm. Tables are limited to four people (unless all people are from the same household group). A takeaway service is permitted.
    Schools are open. Teleworking is mandatory. Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other indoor cultural venues and sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Outdoor cultural and other events can take place with a maximum of 50 people. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information. Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    19.05.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    Up to ten people are allowed to meet together outdoors, except between the hours of midnight and 5am when this is limited to three people (unless from the same household group). A household may receive two people indoors at the same time, provided that these people belong to the same household. Children up to the age of 12 are not included in these limits.
    Shops, hairdressers and beauty salons are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Restaurant, café and bar terraces are open for outdoor service only between the hours of 8am and 10pm. Tables are limited to four people (unless all people are from the same household group). A takeaway service is permitted.
    Schools are open. Teleworking is mandatory. Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other indoor cultural venues and sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Outdoor cultural and other events can take place with a maximum of 50 people. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information. Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are only open for outdoor or room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    12.05.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to ten people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Hairdressers, beauty salons and shops are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    04.05.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to ten people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Hairdressers, beauty salons and shops are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: All passenger traffic from Brazil, India, South Africa to Belgium will be temporarily banned (Brussels Times, 27.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to ten people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Hairdressers, beauty salons and shops are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to ten people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Hairdressers, beauty salons and shops are open. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport.
    It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    27.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is in third countries considered as “red” zones, except if they are EU/Schengen citizens.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    22.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

    Travellers have to fill out a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    20.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Belgian Government has introduced a traffic light system of high, medium and low-risk regions. Belgium’s classification is updated every Sunday and is valid from the Monday immediately following. It is based on the data and criteria communicated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) every Thursday. Each country is given a colour code (red, orange, green). The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country.

    Find out the current colour code assigned by Belgium to each country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information is available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    15.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is classifying risk areas on the basis of the EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information are available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    13.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is classifying risk areas on the basis of the EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information are available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    *From Third Countries:

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    12.04.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is classifying risk areas on the basis of the EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information are available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is classifying risk areas on the basis of the EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to each country. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.

    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. More information are available at https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to the country in question. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 72 hours before departure.

    Children aged 11 and under are exempted.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. For more information, please check https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers who have been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, and who will stay at least 48 hours in Belgium, must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions.
    You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website.
    The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Up to four people (not including children) are allowed to meet together outdoors. Teleworking is mandatory.
    Essential shops (including supermarkets and pharmacies) are open. Non-essential shops are open on an appointment-only basis. Click and collect and home deliveries are possible. Shopping should be done alone or with a maximum of one other person from the same household. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are closed.
    Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people.
    You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English).
    Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information.
    Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government reintroduces lockdown measures because of COVID-19 (New West Record , 24.03.2021). Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. Each country is given a colour code. The measures applicable to travel to Belgium depend on the colour code assigned to the country in question. Detailed and updated information are available at: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers (from the age of 12) arriving from a “red” zone, who are not resident in Belgium, must provide a negative PCR test before entry. The negative test must have been carried out less than 72 hours before departure.

    This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland).

    All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium, returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours, must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. For more information, please check https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for a stay of at least 48 hours, after having been at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine.

    The quarantine lasts 10 days but can be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Teleworking is mandatory. Shops are allowed to open but shopping must be done individually (children under 18 may be accompanied by 1 parent), for a maximum of 30 minutes in a store. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are open under strict protocols. Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people. Up to 10 people are allowed to meet together outdoors. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English). Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information. Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Belgium Latest News: Government will lift ban on non-essential travel abroad from 19 April (Brussels Times, 22.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Belgium is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions. For detailed and updated information, you can visit the page: colour codes by country

    All non-essential travel to and from Belgium is prohibited. Travellers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a declaration indicating the essential reason for their journey (more information and the form can be found at https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    Restrictions for people coming or returning to Belgium from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated Country depend on whether they are returning from a red, orange, or green zone (according to the National definition of risk areas).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers arriving from a “red” zone (from the age of 12), who are not resident in Belgium, must provide a negative PCR test before entry. This test is also mandatory for passengers connecting via Belgium to a Schengen destination (including Switzerland, Norway, and Iceland). The negative test must have been carried out less than 72 hours before departure for Belgium. All travellers from a “red” zone must also undergo a second test on day 7 of the mandatory quarantine.

    Residents of Belgium returning from a “red” zone after a stay of more than 48 hours must undergo a mandatory test on day 1 and day 7 of quarantine.

    There are exceptions in a few strictly limited cases. For more information, please check https://www.info-coronavirus.be

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine lasts 10 days but can be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Contact Point for Belgium

    If you have any questions regarding the Passenger Locator Form, the COVID-19 test, and the obligation of quarantine in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be and, if needed, contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be

     

    Find out more:
    diplomatie.belgium.be
    www.info-coronavirus.be

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Transit is considered essential travel and is therefore allowed. Travelers have to fill in, sign and carry with them a sworn statement indicating the essential reason of their journey (more information and the form can be found at: https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/travels/).

    All persons returning to Belgium and all persons travelling through Belgium who are staying at least 48 hours must fill out a Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Non-essential travel to Belgium is prohibited for persons whose main residence is abroad.

    Essential travel is allowed while respecting restrictions.

    Depending on the country or region you are travelling from, different measures apply.

    • “Red” zones are regions or countries where individuals are at a high risk of infection.
    • “Orange” zones are regions or countries for which a moderately elevated risk of infection has been identified.
    • “Green” zones are regions or countries for which a low risk of infection has been identified.

    Third countries are considered to be “red” zones, with the exception of Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Any person coming (or returning) to Belgium for at least 48 hours, after a stay of at least 48 hours in a “red” zone, must be placed in quarantine. The quarantine can only be terminated with a negative PCR test performed on day 7 of quarantine.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All persons coming or returning to Belgium, or travelling through Belgium, must fill out a Passenger Locator Form in advance. A self-assessment tool is integrated into the Passenger Locator Form.

    There is an exception when the person is travelling by other means than plane or boat and staying less than 48 hours abroad or less than 48 hours in Belgium. This is a very strict exception that can be subject to control.

     

    Find out more:
    Colour codes by country
    Mandatory form for travel to Belgium
    Info coronavirus

    Contact Point
    For any questions concerning the measures applicable to arrival in Belgium, please check the website https://www.info-coronavirus.be/en/ and contact the FPS Public Health on 0800 14 689 or send an e-mail to info.coronavirus@health.fgov.be.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Public spaces and services: The Belgian Government has a number of measures in place to limit the spread of COVID-19. These measures are kept under active review and are subject to an ongoing assessment of local conditions. You should check the latest nationwide updates published by the Belgian Government on their website. The measures include: the closure of restaurants, cafés and bars (except for takeaway service); a curfew from midnight – 5am in Flanders and Wallonia and from 10pm – 6am in Brussels; and the limitation of close contacts to one person (two contacts if you live alone). Teleworking is mandatory. Shops are allowed to open but shopping must be done individually (children under 18 may be accompanied by 1 parent), for a maximum of 30 minutes in a store. Contact professions such as hairdressers and beauty salons are open under strict protocols. Museums, animal parks and swimming pools are open. Other cultural venues and indoor sports facilities (except for children under 12) are closed. Places of worship are open and services can take place with a maximum of 15 people. Up to 10 people are allowed to meet together outdoors. You must respect the rules on social distancing requirements at all times, including on public transport. It is mandatory to carry a mask with you and to wear it in all locations where social distancing cannot be guaranteed, including in busy shopping streets and markets. It is mandatory to wear a mask on public transport and in indoor public spaces, including in shops and places of worship. Children aged 12 and below are exempt. Further details have been published by the Belgian Government (in English). Local authorities have been empowered to take additional measures in the event of a spike in the numbers of local cases. These powers range from requiring that masks be worn in additional locations and circumstances, to introducing localised lockdowns. For example, in Brussels it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public places and streets. You should check regularly the website of the relevant city or town and Belgian Government advice for the latest detailed information. Further details can be found on the Belgian Government website.
    *Accommodation: All types of accommodation are permitted to open subject to compliance with general rules related to COVID-19, but their bars and restaurants are closed. Meals can only be served as room service. Details are available on the Belgian Government website. Check with your accommodation provider for further information.

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    23.03.2021
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Re-Open Europe/
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