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Airlines Updates

Published on 14.12.2020
KLM Reduces flights between South Africa and Amsterdam.

Published on 14.11.2020
KLM to operate flights between Amsterdam and Split from 19 December until 7 January 2021

Published on 13.11.2020
Transavia cancels planned route between Brussels and Innsbruck, TUI fly transfers Innsbruck flights from Antwerp to Brussels

Published on 06.11.2020
KLM to halt flights to four U.K. airports from 16 November until mid-February because of new COVID-19 lockdown

Published on 03.11.2020
Dutch government halts KLM bailout amid standoff over terms

Published on 28.10.2020
Transavia delays resumption of flights to Belgrade, Ljubljana

23.10.2020 TUIfly Netherland in summer 2021 season plans to add 2 destinations from Groningen, announced earlier this month. As of 22OCT20, the airline’s website did not list operational schedule for following routes.

Groningen – Palma Mallorca 11JUL21 – 26SEP21 1 weekly
Groningen – Zakynthos 02JUN21 – 22SEP21 1 weekly

The airline will continue to offer Groningen – Gran Canaria service in summer 2021, twice a week.

Published on 16.10.2020
Transavia mid-Dec 2020 network resumptions as of 15OCT20

16.10.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines up to 15OCT20 filed additional changes to its Intercontinental network for Northern winter 2020/21 season, which saw extended schedule revision into the first week of January 2021. Latest adjustment as of 15OCT20 as follows.

Due to various travel restrictions, certain sector may not be available for reservation in certain direction. Additional changes remain likely.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 04JAN21 Service resumption for both destinations, reduce from 3 to 2 weekly. A330-200 replaces -300
Amsterdam – Accra Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly. 777-200ER replaces -300ER on selected flights in Nov/Dec 2020
Amsterdam – Atlanta Reduce from 14 to 9 weekly, 10 from 04JAN21
KL621/622 2 weekly 777-200ER, replacing 787-9 (Planned 3rd weekly delayed to 04JAN21)
KL623/624 25OCT20 – 03JAN21 787-9 replaces -10, 1 daily (Previous plan: 787-10 from Dec 2020)

Amsterdam – Bangalore 777-200ER replaces 787-9/-10, 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Hong Kong 25OCT20 – 03JAN21 1 daily 787-9/777-300ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Jakarta 25OCT20 – 04JAN21 3 weekly 787-9 (replacing 777-200ER)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9 (replacing 777-200ER; 1 daily 787-9/777-300ER from 04JAN21, 777-300ER only from 01FEB21)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 25OCT20 – 02JAN21 4 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan 25OCT20 – 03JAN21 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Beijing Capital eff 11DEC20 Nonstop service resumes, 2 weekly 777-200ER (tentatively schedules 1 daily from 04JAN21)
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam Reduce from 6 to 5 weekly, 787-9 replaces 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam 1 daily A330-300 as KL771/773/779, replacing opposite direction routing KL765/767/769
Amsterdam – Boston Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 787-9 operating. Buenos Aires – Santiago de Chile sector remains cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Cairo 2 weekly 777-200ER service maintained in NW20
Amsterdam – Calgary Nonstop terminator service reduces from 7 to 3 weekly, A330-300 replaces previously planned 787-9 (Overall service for Calgary reduced to 5 weekly)
Amsterdam – Calgary – Edmonton – Amsterdam Routing consolidation. A330-300 replaces previously planned 787-9, 2 weekly (Reduced from 4 weekly for Edmonton)
KL679 AMS1230 – 1350YYC1540 – 1645YEG1745 – 1025+1AMS 333 46

Amsterdam – Cape Town Reduce from 7 weekly to following
25OCT20 – 06DEC20 4 weekly 777-200ER
eff 07DEC20 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER (7 weekly in December)

Amsterdam – Chengdu 25OCT20 – 05JAN21 Reduce from 3 weekly, 777-200ER replaces 787-9
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 5 weekly 787-9/-10 (selected dates in Nov operated by 777-300ER, 787-10 only 07DEC20 – 03JAN21)
Amsterdam – Curacao Reduce from 11 to 7 weekly. 777-300ER replaces 787-10
Amsterdam – Dammam – Muscat 25OCT20 – 02JAN21 3 weekly A330-300 (A330-200/-300 in Dec. Schedule listed below for Nov 2020 only)
KL1101 AMS1040 – 1840DMM1940 – 2225MCT 333 3
KL1101 AMS1230 – 2040DMM2240 – 0130+1MCT 333 1
KL1101 AMS1500 – 2310DMM0040+1 – 0320+1MCT 333 6

KL1102 MCT0115 – 0210DMM0310 – 0755AMS 333 135

Amsterdam – Delhi Reduce from 7 to 6 weekly, 787-10/777-200ER operating (787-10 only from 04JAN21)
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 787-10, replacing 777-200ER/-300ER/787-9
Amsterdam – Fortaleza Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Havana Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Hong Kong eff 07DEC20 Nonstop service resumes, 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Houston 1 daily 787-9/-10
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER (Additional 2 weekly KL509/510 with 777-200ER scheduled 27OCT20 – 05DEC20)
Amsterdam – Kigali – Entebbe – Amsterdam Reduce from 7 to 4 weekly, A330-200/-300 operating (A330-300 only from 04JAN21)
Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly (4 weekly from 10DEC20), 787-10 operating
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Bahrain eff 05JAN21 Routing resumes, including resumption to Bahrain. Reduce from 6 to 3 weekly, A330-200 replaces -300. This also replaces Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Bahrain – Amsterdam triangle routing
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dubai 29OCT20 – 02JAN21 2 weekly 777-200ER (Bookings not available for Dubai on KL491/492)
Amsterdam – Las Vegas Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Lima eff 05JAN21 Reduce from 7 to 6 weekly, 777-300ER operating
Amsterdam – Lagos Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, A330-200/-300 operating, replacing A330-200/777-200ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER/787-9/787-10
Amsterdam – Mexico City 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Miami Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Minneapolis/St. Paul Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Mumbai Reduce from 7 to 4 weekly with 777-200ER (5 weekly 787-9/-10 from 03JAN21)
Amsterdam – Nairobi Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 787-10 operating
Amsterdam – New York JFK 2 daily 787-9/-10/777-200ER
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 25OCT20 – 13DEC20 Reduce from 7 to 4 weekly, 777-300ER/787-9 operating (777-200ER/787-9 from 29NOV20; Previous plan: 5 weekly in NW20)
Amsterdam – Panama City Reduce from 7 to 6 weekly, 777/787 variants operating
Amsterdam – Paramaribo Reduce from 5 to 2 weekly (4 weekly from 16NOV20), 787-10 replaces 747-400
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam Reduce from 7 to 4 weekly (5 weekly from 08DEC20), 777-200ER operating
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 777-200ER/787-9 operating (787-9 only from 04JAN21)
Amsterdam – Riyadh – Dammam – Amsterdam eff 04JAN21 4 weekly A330-300 (Further delay to planned operation; Riyadh is a service resumption since April 2000; updated 24SEP20)
Amsterdam – St. Maarten 2 weekly A330-200 (operational day changes, aircraft overnight in SXM)
Amsterdam – San Francisco Reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, 787-9 replaces -10 (Previous plan: 4 weekly)
Amsterdam – San Jose (Costa Rica) 10DEC20 – 02JAN21 Service resumption, initially with 2 weekly nonstop terminator flight with 777-200ER
KL759 AMS0955 – 1440SJO 772 46
KL760 SJO1510 – 0820+1AMS 772 57

Amsterdam – San Jose (Costa Rica) – Liberia – Amsterdam eff 05JAN21 Routing resumption, 4 weekly 787-9 (Service resumption for Liberia)
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile 2 weekly nonstop service maintained in entire NW20, 787-9 (777-200ER from 09DEC20. This replaces 1-stop via Buenos Aires)
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon Nonstop terminator service reduces from 7 to 5 weekly, 777-200ER operating
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Beijing 29OCT20 – 04DEC20 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Hangzhou 2 weekly 777-300ER maintained, replacing nonstop Amsterdam – Hangzhou service
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Shanghai Pu Dong Routing maintained, 2 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER (Previous plan: 1 weekly 777-300ER)
Amsterdam – Shanghai Pu Dong Reduce from 11 to 7 weekly, 777-300ER operating (schedule pending)
Amsterdam – Singapore 25OCT20 – 31DEC20 1 daily nonstop terminator service, 777-300ER/787-9 operating (777-300ER only from 07DEC20)
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar eff 01JAN21 4 weekly 777-300ER (Denpasar service resumes, reduce from 7 to 4 weekly)
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta eff 05JAN21 3 weekly 777-300ER (Jakarta overall service reduce from 7 to 3 weekly, replacing 1-stop via Kuala Lumpur)
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila eff 05JAN21 Routing resumes, reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 777-300ER operating
Amsterdam – Tel Aviv eff 23NOV20 Service resumption, 1 daily 737-900ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita Reduce from 7 to 5 weekly, 777-300ER/787-9 operating (787-9 only from 07DEC20, 777-200ER/787-9 from 04JAN21)
Amsterdam – Toronto 9 weekly 777/787 variants
Amsterdam – Vancouver
25OCT20 – 16DEC20 Reduce from 4 to 3 weekly, A330-200/-300 operating
eff 17DEC20 4 weekly A330-300 (selected dates with -200 in Dec)

Amsterdam – Washington Dulles Reduce from 7 to 4 weekly, 787-9 replaces A330-300
Amsterdam – Xiamen Service cancelled in NW20
Amsterdam – Zanzibar – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam eff 10DEC20 2 weekly 787-9 (Zanzibar is a new destination)

12.10.2020 KLM from December 2020 is adding new service to Tanzania, as the airline opened reservation to Zanzibar this week. From 10DEC20, the carrier’s Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft to operate Amsterdam – Zanzibar – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam routing, twice weekly.

KL515 AMS0940 – 2025ZNZ2140 – 2235DAR2340 – 0700+1AMS 789 47

The airline’s Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam routing will be reduced from 6 to 4 weekly from the same date.

Transavia in mid-December 2020 plans to resume following routes, based on the airline’s latest update published on its website.

Planned service resumption includes the following. Note operational frequency is omitted, due to seasonal variation. Additional changes remain likely.

eff 17DEC20
Amsterdam – Belgrade
Amsterdam – Larnaca
Amsterdam – Ljubljana
Amsterdam – Tel Aviv

eff 18DEC20
Amsterdam – Irakleion
Amsterdam – Reykjavik Keflavik

Published on 07.10.2020
KLM Nov 2020 Vancouver operation changes as of 06OCT20

Published on 25.09.2020
KLM delays Riyadh service resumption to Dec 2020
KLM extends Cairo service to March 2021

11.09.2020 KLM yesterday (10SEP20) filed additional routing changes for service to South East Asia and Taiwan. Reported yesterday on Airlineroute, the airline was in the middle of the latest schedule update, resulting in certain South East Asia service displaying up to 2 daily flights available for reservation.

For Northern winter 2020/21 season, revised operational routing as of 10SEP20 as follows.

Amsterdam – Bangkok – Jakarta 25OCT20 – 06DEC20 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 26OCT20 – 05DEC20 3 weekly 777-200ER (1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER from 07DEC20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 25OCT20 – 05DEC20 4 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan 25OCT20 – 06DEC20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar eff 07DEC20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta eff 08DEC20 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila eff 08DEC20 1 daily 777-300ER

Published on 02.09.2020
TUIfly Netherlands Winter 2020/21 season Caribbean routing changes

Published on 29.08.2020
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines will resume its Amsterdam-Taoyuan passenger service, effective Sept. 1.

26.08.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines in the last few weeks adjusted Intercontinental operation for the remainder of Northern summer 2020 season. From 01SEP20 to 24OCT20, planned operation as follows.

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s planned operation, where it may not have passenger traffic rights on certain sectors and/or directions. Additional changes remain possible.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 28SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Accra 4 weekly 777-300ER (5 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER from 03OCT20)
Amsterdam – Accra – Lagos – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER until 12OCT20
Amsterdam – Atlanta 6 weekly 787-9 (1 daily from 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangalore 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Hong Kong 1 daily 777-200ER/787-9 (787-9 only from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Jakarta 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9 (777-200ER/787-9 from 01OCT20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 2 weekly 777-200ER/787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan 4 weekly 777-200ER/787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 4 weekly 787-9 until 28SEP20
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam eff 29SEP20 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-200/-300 (5 weekly from 15OCT20)
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9 (5 weekly from 09SEP20)
Amsterdam – Cairo eff 09SEP20 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Calgary 3 weekly A330-300 (4 weekly from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 2 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 01OCT20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 6 weekly 787-10 (1 daily from 13OCT20)
Amsterdam – Dammam – Muscat 2 weekly A330-200 until 26SEP20
Amsterdam – Delhi 6 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe 16SEP20 – 26SEP20 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Houston 6 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kigali – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER until 26SEP20
Amsterdam – Kigali – Entebbe – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 3 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 02OCT20)
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Bahrain 3 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Lima 6 weekly 777-300ER (1 daily from 10SEP20)
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 9 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 2 weekly 787-9 (3 weekly A330-200 from 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Mumbai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 4 weekly 787-10 (5 weekly from 04OCT20)
Amsterdam – New York JFK 2 daily 777-200ER/-300ER and 787-9/-10
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 4 weekly 787-10 (5 weekly from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Riyadh – Dammam – Amsterdam eff 28SEP20 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (777-200ER/-300ER from 30SEP20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Hangzhou 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Toronto 9 weekly 777-200ER/787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 27SEP20, 4 from 05OCT20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 3 weekly A330-300

KLM from late-August 2020 resumes service to Hangzhou, initially operating Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Hangzhou routing. Boeing 777-200ER aircraft will operate this route once weekly, with flight number changes at Seoul, effective 27AUG20.

KL857 AMS1855 – 1225+1ICN 772 4
KL821 ICN1350 – 1500HGH 772 5

KL822 HGH1850 – 2155ICN 772 5
KL858 ICN0025 – 0445AMS 772 6

KLM Royal Airlines from September 2020 resumes scheduled passenger service to Taiwan, effective from 01SEP20. Initially the Skyteam member operate Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan routing, on board Boeing 777-200ER and -300ER aircraft. 4 weekly flights will be operated between 01SEP20 and 24OCT20.

KL873 AMS2050 – 1250+1BKK1400+1 – 1835+1TPE 77W 35
KL873 AMS2050 – 1250+1BKK1400+1 – 1835+1TPE 772 27

KL874 TPE2010 – 2245BKK2355 – 0640+1AMS 77W 46
KL874 TPE2010 – 2245BKK2355 – 0640+1AMS 772 13

Published on 25.08.2020
KLM resumes Taipei service from Sep 2020

Published on 21.08.2020
KLM temporary resumes Cairo service in Sep/Oct 2020
Transavia Sep/Oct 2020 network resumptions as of 20AUG20

06.08.2020 KLM during the month of August 2020 plans to operate following European network, based on 02AUG20 OAG schedules listing. Effective dates noted in parenthesis represents “week of” (example: from 16AUG20 represents effective from the week of 16AUG20). Frequencies listed below mainly focus on the period of 09AUG20 – 29AUG20.

Due to various travel restrictions, last minute modification may occur. Selected routes will see variation of weekly frequency on selected week. KLM is a participanting carrier of Routes’ hybrid event “Routes Reconnected 2020“, scheduled virtually and in Amsterdam from 30NOV20 to 04DEC20.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Alesund 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante 11 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 26-28 weekly
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Belfast City 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Bergen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Bilbao 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Bologna 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 23 weekly
Amsterdam – Bremen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bristol 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Brussels 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bucharest 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Budapest 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Cardiff 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 28 weekly
Amsterdam – Cork 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dresden 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Dublin 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Durham/Tees Valley 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Genoa 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Helsinki 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Humberside 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Ibiza 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Istanbul 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Krakow 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Kristiansand 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds/Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Linkoping 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 21 weekly
Amsterdam – London City 7 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 26-27 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Madrid 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 11 weekly
Amsterdam – Manchester 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Montpellier 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Moscow Sheremetyevo 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Naples 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Norwich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Oslo 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Prague 16 weekly
Amsterdam – Rome 21 weekly
Amsterdam – St. Petersburg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 23AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sandefjord 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Split 13 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger 18 weekly (14 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Stockholm Arlanda 22 weekly (21 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 16 weekly (14 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Toulouse 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Turin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 10 weekly (11 weekly from 23AUG20)
Amsterdam – Venice 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Warsaw 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Wroclaw 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Zagreb 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 21 weekly

Published on 23.07.2020
KLM resumes Shanghai service from late-July 2020

Published on 21.07.2020
KLM resumes Southampton service from late-August 2020

17.07.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines this week filed additional changes to its planned Intercontinental operation, for August and September 2020. As of 16JUL20, planned operation as follows.

Ongoing travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation and passenger traffic rights.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Accra 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Atlanta 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangalore 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Hong Kong 1 daily 777-200ER/787-9 (until 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 3 weekly 787-9 (until 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam 1 weekly 787-9 (4 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam 5 weekly A330-200/-300 (3 weekly A330-300 from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9 (until 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza – Santiago de Chile eff 31AUG20 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Calgary 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Cape Town 1 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 1 daily 787-10 (6 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Delhi 6 weekly 777-300ER (777-200ER from 31AUG20)

Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Hong Kong eff 28SEP20 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kigali – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 3 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lima 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Mumbai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 4 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – New York JFK 2 daily 777/787
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 777-200ER (1 daily from 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 4 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile 2 weekly 787-9 (until 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (1 of 7 weekly by -200ER from 03SEP20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER (777-300ER from 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 3 weekly A330-300

15.07.2020 Transavia since June 2020 gradually resumed schedule operation. As of 12JUL20, the airline’s operation in July 2020 sees the airline operates 90 routes, although this number (as well as planned operational frequency listed below) varies due to ongoing travel restrictions.

Amsterdam – Alicante 15 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Bari 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Belgrade 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Chania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Corfu 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Faro 12 weekly
Amsterdam – Fuerteventura 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Funchal 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Girona 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 8 weekly

Amsterdam – Ibiza 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Innsbruck 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Irakleion 13 weekly
Amsterdam – Kalamata 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Kos 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lanzarote 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Larnaca 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Ljubljana 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Mahon 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 17 weekly
Amsterdam – Mykonos 3 weekly

Amsterdam – Naples 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Olbia 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Palma Mallorca 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Paphos 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Pisa 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Preveza 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Reykjavik Keflavik 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Rhodes 4 weekly

Amsterdam – Samos 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Santa Cruz de la Palma 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Seville 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Tenerife South 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Thessaloniki 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Thira 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Verona 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Zakynthos 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Alicante 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Athens 4 weekly
Eindhoven – Barcelona 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Bologna 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Faro 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Ibiza 8 weekly
Eindhoven – Irakleion 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Kos 3 weekly

Eindhoven – Lanzarote 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Lisbon 5 weekly
Eindhoven – Malaga 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Nice 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Palma Mallorca 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Rhodes 3 weekly

Eindhoven – Rijeka 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Seville 2 weekly

Eindhoven – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Valencia 9 weekly
Eindhoven – Zakynthos 2 weekly
Groningen – Irakleion 2 weekly
Groningen – Palma Mallorca 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Al Hoceima 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Alicante 10 weekly
Rotterdam – Almeria 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Bergerac 3 weekly
Rotterdam – Brindisi 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Corfu 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Dubrovnik 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Faro 12 weekly
Rotterdam – Girona 7 weekly
Rotterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Ibiza 7 weekly

Rotterdam – Irakleion 5 weekly
Rotterdam – Kos 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Lisbon 3 weekly
Rotterdam – Malaga 10 weekly
Rotterdam – Nador 1 weekly
Rotterdam – Palermo 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Palma Mallorca 6 weekly
Rotterdam – Perugia 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Pula 5 weekly
Rotterdam – Split 6 weekly
Rotterdam – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Valencia 4 weekly
Rotterdam – Zadar 3 weekly
Published on 08.07.2020
Belfast City Airport KLM flights to resume in August

07.07.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines in July 2020 continues to restore various European service, which sees the airline operates 70 routes. Based on weekly frequency listing for the week of 19JUL20, KLM as of 03JUL20 schedules 591 weekly departure flights from Amsterdam, compared to 2117 weekly as of 03APR20 (on 90 routes).

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 15 weekly
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bergen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bilbao 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bologna 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bristol 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Brussels 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bucharest 4 weekly (7 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Budapest 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Dublin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 11 weekly (14 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Genoa 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 6 weekly (7 weekly from 14JUL20)
Amsterdam – Helsinki 13 weekly (14 weekly from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Ibiza 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness 6 weekly (7 weekly from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Istanbul 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 9 weekly (7 weekly from 18JUL20)
Amsterdam – Krakow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds/Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 17 weekly
Amsterdam – London City eff 13JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Madrid 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Manchester 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 7 weekly (11 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Montpellier 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 6 weekly (7 weekly from 19JUL20)
Amsterdam – Oslo 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Prague 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Rome 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Split 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stockholm Arlanda 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Toulouse 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Venice 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Warsaw 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Zagreb 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 7 weekly
29.06.2020
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
has filed additional changes to its planned Inter-continental service for July and August 2020. As of 26JUN20, planned operation between 01JUL20 and 31AUG20 as follows. Due to various travel restrictions, certain service will operate as cargo-only flights.

Additional modification remains likely.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Accra 1 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 11JUL20, 4 weekly 777-300ER from 04AUG20
Amsterdam – Aruba – Curacao – Amsterdam A330-200 operates on 04JUL20
Amsterdam – Atlanta 5 weekly 787-9 (6 weekly 777-300ER/787-9 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bangalore eff 20JUL20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9 (1 daily from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 4 weekly 787-9 until 01AUG20
Amsterdam – Bogota 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam eff 06JUL20 1 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam eff 05JUL20 5 weekly A330-200/-300
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly 777-200ER (A330-300 from 20JUL20)
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 3 weekly 787-9 (4 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Calgary eff 09JUL20 2 weekly 777-200ER (A330-300 on 09JUL20, 3 weekly A330-300 from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 1 weekly 777-200ER (no operation 11JUL20 – 03AUG20, 3 weekly 777-200ER from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Chengdu eff 05AUG20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 3 weekly 787-10 (1 daily from 10JUL20)
Amsterdam – Curacao 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam eff 01JUL20 3 weekly 777-200ER (until 02AUG20)
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam – Kigali – Amsterdam eff 07AUG20 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam – Kilimanjaro – Amsterdam eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Delhi 4 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe eff 05AUG20 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Hong Kong 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 5 weekly 787-9 (6 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200 (4 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lagos 2 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 14JUL20)
Amsterdam – Lima 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal eff 15JUL20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Mumbai 4 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 29JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nairobi 2 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly 787-10 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – New York JFK 1 daily 787-10 (2 daily 777/787 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 787-9 (777-200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 1 weekly 777-200ER (-300ER on 03JUL20, 4 weekly 787-10 from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Quito 3 weekly 777-200ER (until 31JUL20)
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam eff 03AUG20 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly 787-9 (via Curacao on inbound on 03JUL20)
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile eff 05AUG20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (5 weekly 777-300ER and 2 weekly -200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly 777-300ER and 2 weekly -200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar eff 06JUL20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta eff 07JUL20 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER (until 02AUG20)
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila eff 03AUG20 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 6 weekly 777-300ER (1 daily from 21JUL20)
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver eff 07JUL20 3 weekly 787-10 (777-200ER from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 2 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly A330-300 from 04AUG20)

Published on 24.06.2020
KLM to resume London-Amsterdam flights from 13 July

23.06.2020 TUI fly Netherlands has outlined planned operation when it resumes scheduled service on 01JUL20. For the month of July and August 2020, the airline initially plans to operate following routes. Further changes remain likely, based on possible changes to travel restrictions. Information is based on 21JUN20 OAG schedules update.

Amsterdam – Antalya eff 10JUL20 4 weekly 737-800/767 (5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bodrum eff 13JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Bodrum – Dalaman – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 767
Amsterdam – Bonaire eff 09JUL20 1 weekly 787-8
Amsterdam – Bourgas eff 09JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Corfu – Preveza – Amsterdam eff 18JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Curacao eff 02JUL20 3 weekly 787-8 (4 weekly from 26JUL20)
Amsterdam – Curacao – Aruba – Amsterdam eff 21JUL20 1 weekly 787-8
Amsterdam – Dalaman eff 22JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Enfidha eff 21JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 03JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (5 weekly 737/787-8 from 19JUL20, 7 weekly from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Ibiza eff 10JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Irakleion eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly from 13JUL20, 5 weekly 737/787-8 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Izmir eff 11JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Izmir – Antalya – Amsterdam eff 05AUG20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Karpathos eff 06AUG20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Karpathos – Chania – Amsterdam eff 19JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Kefallinia – Zakynthos – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Kos eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (4 weekly 737/767 from 18JUL20, 5 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lanzarote – Fuerteventura – Amsterdam eff 16JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Marsa Alam – Hurghada – Amsterdam eff 18JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Ohrid eff 14JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Palma Mallorca eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Paphos eff 09JUL20 2 weekly 737-800/767
Amsterdam – Rhodes eff 02JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly 737/787-8 from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Samos – Mytilene – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 737-800 (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sao Vicente – Ilha do Sal – Amsterdam eff 27JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Tenerife South eff 03JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly 737-800/787-8 from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zakynthos eff 04JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (1 weekly from 20JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zakynthos – Kefallinia – Amsterdam eff 20JUL20 1 weekly 737-80023.06.20202 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines earlier this month extended interim operation to 02AUG20, as the airline continues to restore various destinations in July 2020. On Inter-continental routes, planned operation for the month of July 2020 as follows.

Due to various traffic restrictions, certain routes listed below is only operating as cargo service. Flights to Mainland China in the list only represents passenger service.

Amsterdam – Accra 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Aruba – Bonaire – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Atlanta 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Calgary 2 weekly 777-200ER (from 09JUL20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 4 weekly 777-200ER (from 21JUL20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 5 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Delhi 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Hong Kong 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Lima 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 1 daily A330-200 (from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Mumbai 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – New York JFK 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Quito 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Curacao – Amsterdam 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 6 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 787-10 (from 07JUL20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 2 weekly 777-200ER
16.06.2020 KLM

KLM in June and July 2020 is gradually resuming additional European routes. As of 12JUN20, KLM’s European service sees 70 routes with 385 weekly departures from Amsterdam, for the week of 14JUN20. Additional routes and frequencies will be restored from 01JUL20, which sees up to 611 weekly departures on 73 routes for the week of 05JUL20.

Due to various travel restrictions, passenger traffic rights may be impacted and further modification remains likely. Routes to be resumed in July 2020 is listed as eff 01JUL20, but not necessary means first resumed flight operates on 01JUL20.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Barcelona 7 weekly (15 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bergen 6 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bilbao eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Brussels 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bucharest 4 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Budapest 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari eff 01JUL20 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 2 weekly (4 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Dublin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Helsinki 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Ibiza eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Istanbul eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Krakow eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – London City 42 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Madrid 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Manchester 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Montpellier 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Moscow Sheremetyevo eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nice 2 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Oslo 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 13 weekly (21 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Prague 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Rome 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Split eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – St. Petersburg eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stockholm 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Toulouse eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia eff 01JUL20 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Venice 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Warsaw 4 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zagreb eff 01JUL20 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 7 weekly

07.06.2020

  • Alicante, Spain;
  • Bologna, Italy;
  • Ibiza, Spain;
  • Istanbul, Turkey;
  • Split, Croatia.

The airline also has plans to open up in other regions as well.

KLM goes intercontinental

For July, KLM has planned an additional six routes. It will fly to:

  • Calgary, Canada;
  • Denpasar, Indonesia;
  • Jakarta, Indonesia;
  • San Francisco, US;
  • Vancouver, Canada;
  • Washington, US.

Published on 04.06.2020

KLM resumes additional Caribbean passenger service in June 2020

Published on 02.06.2020
KLM to resume additional flights to southern Europe in July

Published on 28.05.2020
Air France-KLM will resume flights to and from Italy from 1 June

Read more
Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Netherlands
Crossing Rules

Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden or Switzerland.
– This does not apply to passengers with a Schengen visa issued after 19 March 2020 traveling through the Netherlands to another Schengen Member State.
– This does not apply to students with a proof of admission to a course of study.

Passengers and airline crew entering or transiting through the Netherlands must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) rapid test. The test must have been taken at most 4 hours before departure from the first embarkation point or of the last direct flight to the Netherlands. Tests accepted are: rapid antigen or molecular tests (Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT), TMA, LAMP or PCR.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.
– This does not apply when arriving from Aruba, Australia, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, China (People’s Rep.), Curacao, Hong Kong (SAR China), Iceland, Korea (Rep.), Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, St. Maarten or Thailand. Updates on this list of countries can be obtained at https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries

Passengers entering or transiting through the Netherlands must have a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) molecular PCR test result. The test must have been taken at most 72 hours before arrival. The certificate must be in Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. Details can be found at https://tinyurl.com/y9ec342o .
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Aruba, Australia, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, China (People’s Rep.), Curacao, Hong Kong (SAR China), Iceland, Korea (Rep.), Macao (SAR China), New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, St. Maarten or Thailand. Updates on this list of countries can be obtained at https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.
– This does not apply to passengers a medical certificate with a negative Coronavirus (COVID-19) LAMP rapid test taken at most 4 hours before departure from the first embarkation point or of the last direct flight to the Netherlands.

A completed “Health Declaration Form” must be presented prior to boarding. The form can be found at https://tinyurl.com/ybtmdgja .
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.

A completed “Negative Test Declaration” must be printed and presented upon arrival. The form can be found at https://www.government.nl/documents/forms/2020/12/04/coronavirus-negative-test-declaration-form .
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.
– This does not apply to passengers arriving from Aruba, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bonaire, St. Eustatius and Saba, Bulgaria, China (People’s Rep.), Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Curacao, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Korea (Rep.), Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macao (SAR China), Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Rwanda, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, St. Maarten Sweden, Switzerland or Thailand..

Flights from/to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cabo Verde, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela are suspended
Flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Rep. Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, United Kingdom, Uruguay and Venezuela to the Netherlands are suspended until 4 March 2021.

Home/self isolation
Passengers could be subject to self-quarantine for 10 days. A list of quarantine exemptions can be found at https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19.

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Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 October 2020

Travel as little as possible.
Work from home as much as possible.
Only go to work if there is absolutely no other option.

Wear a mouth mask in buildings where you as a public are allowed to enter. For example in the library, a shop or the station.
Wear a face mask on public transport.

New rules for sports
Sports are only allowed at a distance of 1.5 meters from others.
Exercise alone. Or in a team of up to 4 people.
Competitions are not allowed.
This applies to people aged 18 and over.
The sports rules do not apply to children under the age of 18.
They are allowed to sport in larger teams.
Or play matches with teams from their own club.
Sports canteens are closed.
Showers and changing rooms are closed.

Always keep a distance of 1.5 meters.
Do not go to places where it is busy.
Sneeze and cough into your elbow.
Wash your hands often with soap.
Wear a mouth mask where necessary.
Do you have a cold? Then stay at home!
Do you have a fever or are you short of breath? Then all housemates must stay at home.

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 December 2020

Travel as little as possible.
Are you going on a trip? Then stay at your holiday address as much as possible. For example in your holiday home.

All passengers flying to and from the Netherlands must complete a health declaration. With this you declare that you will not travel if you have complaints that match COVID-19. Otherwise you will not receive a boarding pass or you will not be allowed on board. In addition, everyone who travels to the Netherlands from a country to which the entry ban applies, is placed in home quarantine after arriving in the Netherlands. Airline crew members, medical personnel (who come to the Netherlands for work-related purposes), seafarers with a sailor’s booklet and diplomats are exempt from the quarantine measure.

The cabinet has taken these measures to limit the influx of people who may be infected with COVID-19. In addition, we protect passengers and crew during the flight.

Read more
Flight Restrictions

published 30.09.2020

Entry restrictions
Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to students with a notification letter issued by the Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND). The letter must be stated in Dutch and contain as from 3 July 2020 an English textblock.
– This does not apply to partners with a completed “Declaration of relationship for COVID-19 entry ban exemption” form, a return onward ticket and proof that they have been in a relationship for at least 3 months with a resident of the Netherlands who is a national of an EEA Member State or Switzerland. As well as accompanying children of the partner who are younger than 18 years. More details can be found at government.nl.

A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk COVID-19 countries must be presented prior to boarding. The form can be found at government.nl.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.

Read more
Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation.

All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine. The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

Read more
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification required for entering the country.

Travellers arriving in the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT). The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Children aged 12 and under are exempted.
A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

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Vaccination

Yellow fever (2019)
Country requirement at entry: no
WHO vaccination recommendation: no

Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Partially closed

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 October 2020

All cafes and restaurants are closed.
Takeaways may open.
The rules do not apply to cafes and restaurants at:
hotels (for hotel guests);
funeral homes;
airports past the security check.
Cafés and restaurants in other buildings must be closed.
For example in museums.

Shops close at 8 p.m. at the latest.
There are no shopping evenings.
Only supermarkets are allowed to open longer.

The sale of alcohol is prohibited between 8 PM and 7 AM.
You are therefore not allowed to have alcohol with you on the street.
You are also not allowed to use alcohol in public places. For example on the street.
Alcohol should also not be home delivery.
Coffee shops must close at 8 p.m.
Coffee shops are only open for takeout.

Events stop: Banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 October 2020

Receive a maximum of 3 guests per day at home.
Children up to and including 12 years are not included.
A maximum of 30 people may be together in an indoor space.
Children count.
You may meet with a group of maximum 4 people.
Or with all the people who belong to your household.
For example in a cinema.
Children up to and including 12 years are not included.
A maximum of 4 people may be together outside.
Or all people who belong to 1 household.

All events are prohibited.
The following events may take place:

Food markets
Trade fairs and conferences
Cinemas and theaters
Matches
Demonstrations

Read more
Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 14 October 2020 to 31 October 2020

Wear a face mask in high school.
Wear a face mask in secondary vocational schools.
Wear a face mask at colleges and universities.
Only remove the mouth mask during class.
This applies to everyone from the age of 13.

Read more
Other

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD

Full Restrictions

  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government imposes ban on flights from India until at least 1 May because of rise in COVID-19 cases (Schengen Visa Info, 29.04.2021). Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). On 28 April the government lifted a number of lockdown measures including the evening curfew.
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: DFDS. All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    On 28 April 2021, the Dutch government introduced a number of relaxations to the lockdown measures. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between noon and 6pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    05.05.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government imposes ban on flights from India until at least 1 May because of rise in COVID-19 cases (Schengen Visa Info, 29.04.2021). Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    At present, most people cannot travel to Norway without belonging to one of the exceptions. This applies to citizens of all countries, including citizens from the EU/EEA and Nordic citizens. This includes:

    • Tourists
    • Family members not listed under the Exceptions: close family members section
    • boyfriend/girlfriend or fiancé;
    • EU/EEA citizens (including Nordic citizens) who are going to work or study in Norway, and who do not belong to any of the exceptions listed below
    • persons who have been granted a residence permit to work or study in Norway and who are not already resident here
    • business travelers
    • foreigners who have been granted a Schengen visa, but who do not belong to any of the exceptions below
    • persons who have leisure property in Norway, but are not resident here

    List of exceptions (UDI.no)

    The testing, travel registration, quarantine, and quarantine hotel requirements will remain in force for travellers who are exempt from the entry restrictions.

    Vaccination does not currently affect quarantine requirements or test recommendations.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers (including those who are resident in Norway) allowed to enter Norway from countries or regions that are defined as high-risk areas must complete a 10-day quarantine in a designated hotel. When you arrive in Norway from a high-risk country, you should travel directly to an appropriate place to stay during the quarantine period, preferably by private transport. If you need to use public transport, wearing a face mask throughout the journey is strongly required.

    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a second PCR test no less than 7 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    Entry quarantine upon arrival in Norway from red countries/regions

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk areas are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test. Approved test methods are PCR or rapid antigen test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to arrival. For people arriving by plane, 24 hours apply before the scheduled departure time of the first flight.

    The certificate must be in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, French or German. Foreign nationals who cannot document a negative Covid-19 test upon arrival can be refused entry to Norway.

    This requirement does not apply to Norwegians, people living in Norway, people in transit or people who frequently cross the border from Sweden and Finland for work purposes.

    The requirement does not apply to people who can document with an approved laboratory method that they have undergone COVID-19 during the last six months.

    Test upon arrival: Anyone who has stayed in an area with a quarantine duty during the last 10 days before arrival has a duty to be tested at the border crossing point upon arrival in Norway. The test must be either PCR or rapid antigen test. In the case of a positive rapid antigen test, the person must take a PCR test within 24 hours of arrival.

     

    Additional Travel Documentation

    Everyone travelling to Norway must complete the registration form prior to crossing the border. This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

    After completing the digital registration, you will receive a receipt which you must then present to the police at the border control. You cannot register your journey any earlier than 72 hours prior to the time of arrival.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel advice – helsenorge.no
    International Travel rules
    Entry rules
    https://www.fhi.no/en/

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Transit is possible for citizens of EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries.
    For updated information on countries and measures you can visit the page on the infection control advice for travel and entry quarantine

    *From Third Countries:

    At present, most people cannot travel to Norway without belonging to one of the exceptions. This applies to citizens of all countries, including citizens from the EU/EEA and Nordic citizens. This includes:

    • Tourists
    • Family members not listed under the Exceptions: close family members section
    • boyfriend/girlfriend or fiancé;
    • EU/EEA citizens (including Nordic citizens) who are going to work or study in Norway, and who do not belong to any of the exceptions listed below
    • persons who have been granted a residence permit to work or study in Norway and who are not already resident here
    • business travelers
    • foreigners who have been granted a Schengen visa, but who do not belong to any of the exceptions below
    • persons who have leisure property in Norway, but are not resident here

    Some of the exceptions:

    • foreigners residing in Norway
    • foreigners who have been granted a family immigration permit
    • foreigners who will visit or live with close family members in Norway
    • spouse or registered partner
    • foreigners who are going to have scheduled contact with their children
    • journalists and other personnel on behalf of a foreign media institution
    • foreigners who are going to stopover at an airport in Norway (both in international airport transit and within Schengen)

    Complete list of exceptions (UDI.no)

    The testing, travel registration, quarantine, and quarantine hotel requirements will remain in force for travellers who are exempt from the entry restrictions.

    Vaccination does not currently affect quarantine requirements or test recommendations.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers allowed to enter Norway from countries or regions that are defined as high-risk areas will have to quarantine for 10 days in a designated hotel. The requirement to stay in a designated hotel does not apply to people who reside in Norway or own a home or holiday home in Norway, as well as a suitable place to stay during the quarantine period. When you arrive in Norway from a high-risk country, you should travel directly to an appropriate place to stay during the quarantine period, preferably by private transport. If you need to use public transport, wearing a face mask throughout the journey is strongly required.

    Map with risk classification

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Travellers coming from high-risk areas must provide a certificate of a negative COVID-19 test taken less than 24 hours before entry. The certificate must be in Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, English, French or German. Foreign nationals who cannot document a negative Covid-19 test upon arrival can be refused entry to Norway. This requirement does not apply to Norwegians, people living in Norway, people in transit or people who frequently cross the border from Sweden and Finland for work purposes.

    If you have visited an area that triggers quarantine duty during the last 10 days, you are required to take a test for the coronavirus upon arrival to Norway.

    The test must be taken at the airport or when crossing the border.

    Travellers from Great Britain, South Africa or Brazil are subject to specific rules for testing.

     

    Additional Travel Documentation

    Everyone travelling to Norway must complete the registration form prior to crossing the border. This also applies to Norwegian citizens.

    After completing the digital registration, you will receive a receipt which you must then present to the police at the border control. You cannot register your journey any earlier than 72 hours prior to the time of arrival.

     

    Find out more:
    Travel advice – helsenorge.no
    Entry rules
    https://www.fhi.no/en/

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). On 28 April the government lifted a number of lockdown measures including the evening curfew.
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: DFDS. All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    On 28 April 2021, the Dutch government introduced a number of relaxations to the lockdown measures. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between noon and 6pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    04.05.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government imposes ban on flights from India until at least 1 May because of rise in COVID-19 cases (Schengen Visa Info, 29.04.2021). Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). On 28 April the government lifted a number of lockdown measures including the evening curfew.
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: DFDS. All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    On 28 April 2021, the Dutch government introduced a number of relaxations to the lockdown measures. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between noon and 6pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government imposes ban on flights from India until at least 1 May because of rise in COVID-19 cases (Schengen Visa Info, 29.04.2021). Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). On 28 April the government lifted a number of lockdown measures including the evening curfew.
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: DFDS. All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    On 28 April 2021, the Dutch government introduced a number of relaxations to the lockdown measures. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between noon and 6pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    29.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). On 28 April the government lifted a number of lockdown measures including the evening curfew.
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: DFDS. All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    On 28 April 2021, the Dutch government introduced a number of relaxations to the lockdown measures. The evening curfew has been lifted, outdoor dining at restaurants and cafés is permitted between noon and 6pm, and non-essential shops are now open without the need to make a prior appointment. The Dutch government continues to advise people to avoid busy places. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. More details can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    *Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    27.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government to ban passenger flights from India from 26 April until 1 May (Live Mint, 26.04.2021). Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    *Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    26.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train or coach from a high-risk area, you are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative COVID-19 test.

    Accepted tests: molecular NAAT test (PCR, RT PCR, LAMP, TMA or mPOCT).

    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Alternatively, you can present both a negative NAAT (PCR) test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats. The rapid test must meet certain requirements

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

    A negative COVID-19 test result is not mandatory if you are travelling to the Netherlands by car. The same applies to travellers on a regional, cross-border bus that remains within 30 km of the Dutch border on both sides, as well as those travelling on regional cross-border trains.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    *Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    13.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Night-time curfew and other COVID-19 restrictions will remain until at least 28 April (Reuters, 11.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, if the PCR test is taken within 72 hours prior to boarding, a second test (rapid antigen test) must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    *Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    12.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions extended until 20 April; curfew will begin an hour later (NL Times, 31.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, if the PCR test is taken within 72 hours prior to boarding, a second test (rapid antigen test) must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    *Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    01.04.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 20 April, recommends against travel abroad until 15 May (Reuters, 23.03.2021). COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, if the PCR test is taken within 72 hours prior to boarding, a second test (rapid antigen test) must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:
    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you. If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover. If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Internal Restrictions: *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 10pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).

    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 May 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    * Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 20 April, recommends against travel abroad until 15 May (Reuters, 23.03.2021). COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, if the PCR test is taken within 72 hours prior to boarding, a second test (rapid antigen test) must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 20 April, recommends against travel abroad until 15 May (Reuters, 23.03.2021). COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers from high-risk countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test.
    The test must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding. Alternatively, if the PCR test is taken within 72 hours prior to boarding, a second test (rapid antigen test) must be taken within 24 hours prior to boarding.

    Children aged 12 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All travellers must complete a 10-day mandatory quarantine.
    The quarantine period may be shortened by taking a PCR test no less than 5 days after arrival. If the result of this test is negative, the period of quarantine can end.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 20 April, recommends against travel abroad until 15 May (Reuters, 23.03.2021). COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain specific restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    If you are aged 13 or above and you are travelling from a high-risk country, you must provide proof that you have tested negative for COVID-19. You can do this by presenting a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding. Alternatively, you can present both a negative PCR test result based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands and a negative rapid test result based on a sample collected no more than 24 hours before boarding.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. The quarantine period can be ended by a negative result to a COVID-19 test performed on day 5 after arrival.

    You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.

    Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector, and those travelling from low-risk countries.

     

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

     

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    Requirements for COVID-19 tests
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

     

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories or if your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

    Dutch nationals are always permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Netherlands The Netherlands’ government has decided to extend the advice against travelling abroad for its citizens, until May 15, after taking into account the current infection rate of the Coronavirus in foreign countries.

    The decision is an additional preventive measure imposed by the Dutch government to avoid travelling during the Easter holidays, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    In addition, the country’s administration has also decided to extend its restrictive measures after a rise in the number of COVID-19 infections.

    “The number of coronavirus infections is still increasing, as is the number of COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs). The third wave is becoming apparent, so the measures currently in place are going to be extended,” the statement published by the country’s government has pointed out.

    Yet, the Dutch government‘s decision to extend Coronavirus lockdown by three weeks has been considered disappointing by the country’s Prime Minister Mark Rutte.

    “I understand the impatience, and we see unrest in society, but at the same time, locally, I see the huge efforts from mayors to maintain the peace. It is important for us all, and it is a responsibility for us all. We have to do this together,” he pointed out.

    The Netherlands’ government will announce its further steps and decisions, which may come into effect after April 20. Such an announcement will be revealed during a press conference that is set to be held on April 13.

    Read more
    25.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. 

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban or when your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. 

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    23.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Travelling from an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country is not allowed, subject to the conditions specified hereafter. The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.
    Is a coronavirus test required: YES.
    • All travellers aged above 13 (including Dutch nationals) that travel to the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, train, or coach must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result that meets certain requirements, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands.
    • If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft or ship from a high-risk country, you must take a rapid test that meets certain requirements shortly before departure, unless you can present a negative NAAT test result, based on a sample collected no more than 12 hours before boarding.
    Is a quarantine required: YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey.
    Mandatory Travel Documentation: If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.
    Other: Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).
    Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries: If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban or when your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area. There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.
    Entry requirements:
    • All travellers aged above 13 (including Dutch nationals) must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result if they are coming from a high-risk area to the Netherlands (by aircraft, ship, train and coach).

    • If you are travelling to the Netherlands by aircraft or ship from a high-risk country, you must also take a rapid test shortly before departure. Several requirements to the rapid test apply. Certain exemptions apply, including for diplomats.
    • If you are coming from a country that is not in the EU or Schengen area and you are not a national of an EU or Schengen country, you must also fill in a negative test declaration and carry it with you.
    • You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your self-quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation.
    • If you are travelling by air you must also fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.
    Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    19.03.2021
  • Netherlands Negative tests mandatory for passengers departing from high-risk areas
    If you are travelling to the Netherlands, you need to show a negative COVID-19 test result if you’re departing from a high-risk country. This is any country that’s not on the EU list of safe countries .

    If you are travelling from a high-risk country, you have 2 options.

    Option 1
    You have to show 1 test result:

    a negative COVID-19 NAAT (PCR) test result that was taken within 24 hours before boarding your flight to the Netherlands.
    Option 2
    You have to show 2 test results:

    a negative COVID-19 NAAT (PCR) test result that was taken within 72 hours before your arrival in the Netherlands.
    a negative COVID-19 rapid test result that was taken within 24 hours before boarding your flight to the Netherlands.
    If you have a transfer in Amsterdam, you only need 1 NAAT (PCR) test result that’s issued within 72 hours before arrival in Amsterdam.

    The digital or hard-copy negative test result must be in English, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or Dutch. You can view the COVID-19 NAAT or rapid test locations per country.

    Read more about the COVID-19 NAAT (PCR, mPOCT, NAAT, RT PCR, RT LAMP and TMA) tests and rapid tests on the website of the Dutch government.

    If you’re departing from outside the EU or Schengen area, you also need to show a printed and signed negative test declaration.

    The negative NAAT (PCR) test result
    Your NAAT test result should be in English, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish or Dutch. Make sure your COVID-19 NAAT test document includes the following:

    Type of test: this must be a NAAT test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19.
    Your test result: the test result must be negative.
    Your first and last name, as stated in your passport.
    Date and time the test was conducted: this must have been no more than 72 hours before arrival in The Netherlands.
    Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    https://www.klm.com/travel/ua_en/prepare_for_travel/up_to_date/flight_update/index.htm

    Read more
    18.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. To prepare for your journey you can do the Quarantine Check for Travellers. This is a checklist of steps to take before and after your journey. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. 

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban or when your country is on the list of safe countries outside the EU/Schengen area.  

    There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    Measures are expected to change from 16 March onwards. 

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    16.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    If your journey includes a transfer in the Netherlands or another country, the rules are as follows:

    If you start your journey in a safe country and change planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport, you are not required to present a negative test result. If you leave the airport, however, the negative test result requirement does apply to you.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in another country the negative test result requirement applies to you, even if the country where you change planes is a safe country. The result remains valid during the layover.

    If you start your journey in a high-risk country and change planes in the Netherlands the negative test result requirement applies to you, regardless of whether you leave the airport.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela.. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    12.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: COVID-19 lockdown extended until 31 March; people advised to avoid all but unavoidable foreign travel until 15 April (ABCNews, 09.03.2021) Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, and Venezuela.. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 9pm and 4:30am unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until 15 April 2021 (inclusive). Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    10.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government will lift ban on passenger flights, ferries from U.K. on 9 March (Reuters, 08.03.2021 ). Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021). Some COVID-19 lockdown measures eased as curfew extended until 15 March; no change in travel regulations (Dutch News, 24.02.2021). Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (Reuters, 18.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa and South American countries from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from Argentinia, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Suriname, Uruguay, the United Kingdom, and Venezuela.. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website
    , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    09.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government extends ban on flights to, from several countries until 1 April because of COVID-19 variants; Cape Verde flight ban lifted (NL Times, 04.03.2021). Some COVID-19 lockdown measures eased as curfew extended until 15 March; no change in travel regulations (Dutch News, 24.02.2021). Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (18.02.2021, Reuters). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website
    , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    05.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Some COVID-19 lockdown measures eased as curfew extended until 15 March; no change in travel regulations (Dutch News, 24.02.2021). Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (18.02.2021, Reuters). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    .rTableBody { display: table-row-group; }
    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website
    , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    02.03.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Some COVID-19 lockdown measures eased as curfew extended until 15 March; no change in travel regulations (Dutch News, 24.02.2021). Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (18.02.2021, Reuters). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website
    , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    26.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Some COVID-19 lockdown measures eased as curfew extended until 15 March; no change in travel regulations (Dutch News, 24.02.2021). Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (18.02.2021, Reuters). Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website
    , along with a limited list of exemptions.
    As of 3 March 2021, non-essential shops are open by appointment, which should be made at least 4 hours in advance. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. As of 3 March 2021, hairdressers and other contact-based professions will be open again. Gyms, museums, cinemas, zoos, amusement parks and other public spaces remain closed until further notice.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    25.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Night curfew remains as government circumvents court order to drop it (18.02.2021, Reuters). Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    .rTableBody { display: table-row-group; }
    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020 until at least 2 March 2021. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    23.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
    .rTableRow { display: table-row; }
    .rTableHeading { background-color: #ddd; display: table-header-group; }
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    .rTableBody { display: table-row-group; }
    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restrictions.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Additionally, for the Netherlands, the following rules apply:

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020 until at least 2 March 2021. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    19.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Flights at Eindhoven Airport will remain canceled until 9 February; increasing delays expected at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020 until at least 2 March 2021. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online.
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    16.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Flights at Eindhoven Airport will remain canceled until 9 February; increasing delays expected at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the
    Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries. DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December 2020 until at least 2 March 2021. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available online. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated
    here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found
    here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found
    here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    10.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Flights at Eindhoven Airport will remain canceled until 9 February; increasing delays expected at Amsterdam Schiphol Airport (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Government will extend night-time curfew intended to slow spread of COVID-19 through 2 March (Reuters, 08.02.2021). Train services will be reduced to minimum level on 7 February as stay-at-home order is issued (Reuters, 06.02.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries.DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. here
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).

    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    09.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until at least 2 March (Reuters, 02.02.2021). Rapid test required for travelers before entry from 23 January to at least 9 February (NL and You, 21.01.2021) Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to the Netherlands:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    .rTable { display: table; width: 100%;}
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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed.
    The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Ferries.DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. here
    A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website
    for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).

    Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed.
    Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households.
    The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until the end of March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    05.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Rapid test required for travelers before entry from 23 January to at least 9 February (NL and You, 21.01.2021) Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to the Netherlands: From Saturday 23 January 12:01pm (CET) a travel ban will be in effect for all passenger flights and passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. This means that no passengers will be allowed to travel to the Netherlands, apart from exceptional circumstances such as travel for medical reasons. Until that date, the below entry requirements including testing and self-isolation apply. Freight traffic is exempt from the travel ban.
    The Dutch Government has announced that from 1 January 2021, non-EU/EEA nationals and nationals of non-Schengen states, including UK nationals, will not be permitted entry to the Netherlands for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. Please see the Dutch Government’s website for a list of exemptions. International arrivals from outside the EU and Schengen countries remain subject to entry checks to prevent non-essential travel.
    The Dutch Government requires all international travellers aged 13 and above travelling by aeroplane, passenger ferry, train and coach to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result and a completed test declaration. More information on these requirements can be found here. There are some limited exemptions to this requirement, listed on Dutch Government’s website.
    In addition, the Dutch government requires travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by aeroplane or ferry to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding. For transport sector personnel, the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test must have been conducted no more than 24 hours prior to boarding. If you have a negative LAMP test, you do not also need to provide a negative PCR or rapid antigen test. The Dutch government will not accept the results of self-administered tests. This applies to both the PCR and the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirements. There is an exemption for hauliers, for whom self-administered tests will be accepted.
    Most travellers will be required to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, even if exempt from taking a PCR COVID-19 test. There are some limited exemptions. Travellers, including transit passengers, should check the Dutch Government’s website for comprehensive information on testing requirements and exemptions. Hauliers, for example, are not required to show proof of a negative PCR test result and a completed test declaration, but, if arriving from the UK, will need to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test taken within the last 24 hours.
    More details on the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirement, including exemptions, are available on the Dutch Government’s website.

    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Amsterdam Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    02.02.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Rapid test required for travelers before entry from 23 January to at least 9 February (NL and You, 21.01.2021) Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to the Netherlands: From Saturday 23 January 12:01pm (CET) a travel ban will be in effect for all passenger flights and passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. This means that no passengers will be allowed to travel to the Netherlands, apart from exceptional circumstances such as travel for medical reasons. Until that date, the below entry requirements including testing and self-isolation apply. Freight traffic is exempt from the travel ban.
    The Dutch Government has announced that from 1 January 2021, non-EU/EEA nationals and nationals of non-Schengen states, including UK nationals, will not be permitted entry to the Netherlands for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. Please see the Dutch Government’s website for a list of exemptions. International arrivals from outside the EU and Schengen countries remain subject to entry checks to prevent non-essential travel.
    The Dutch Government requires all international travellers aged 13 and above travelling by aeroplane, passenger ferry, train and coach to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result and a completed test declaration. More information on these requirements can be found here. There are some limited exemptions to this requirement, listed on Dutch Government’s website.
    In addition, the Dutch government requires travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by aeroplane or ferry to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding. For transport sector personnel, the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test must have been conducted no more than 24 hours prior to boarding. If you have a negative LAMP test, you do not also need to provide a negative PCR or rapid antigen test. The Dutch government will not accept the results of self-administered tests. This applies to both the PCR and the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirements. There is an exemption for hauliers, for whom self-administered tests will be accepted.
    Most travellers will be required to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, even if exempt from taking a PCR COVID-19 test. There are some limited exemptions. Travellers, including transit passengers, should check the Dutch Government’s website for comprehensive information on testing requirements and exemptions. Hauliers, for example, are not required to show proof of a negative PCR test result and a completed test declaration, but, if arriving from the UK, will need to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test taken within the last 24 hours.
    More details on the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirement, including exemptions, are available on the Dutch Government’s website.

    *From within the EU:

    The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    YES.

    Is a quarantine required? 

    YES. You must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arriving in the Netherlands. You can get tested again on day 5 after your arrival. If the result is negative you can end your quarantine. Some travellers do not have to self-quarantine, for example, workers in the transport sector. You can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    If you are travelling by air you must fill in a health declaration and carry it with you. Some airlines allow you to complete this health declaration digitally at check-in.

    Other

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

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    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Entry requirements:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Amsterdam Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. A night-time curfew applies throughout the Netherlands as part of the Dutch Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You are not allowed to be outdoors between 21:00 and 04:30 unless you have a permitted reason. See the Dutch Government’s website for a list of permitted reasons. If it is essential for you to be outdoors during curfew hours, you must complete a self-certified declaration form, which is also available on the Dutch Government’s website, along with a limited list of exemptions. Shops selling non-essential items are closed, as are public spaces. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    29.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Rapid test required for travelers before entry from 23 January to at least 9 February (NL and You, 21.01.2021) Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to the Netherlands: From Saturday 23 January 12:01pm (CET) a travel ban will be in effect for all passenger flights and passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. This means that no passengers will be allowed to travel to the Netherlands, apart from exceptional circumstances such as travel for medical reasons. Until that date, the below entry requirements including testing and self-isolation apply. Freight traffic is exempt from the travel ban.
    The Dutch Government has announced that from 1 January 2021, non-EU/EEA nationals and nationals of non-Schengen states, including UK nationals, will not be permitted entry to the Netherlands for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. Please see the Dutch Government’s website for a list of exemptions. International arrivals from outside the EU and Schengen countries remain subject to entry checks to prevent non-essential travel.
    The Dutch Government requires all international travellers aged 13 and above travelling by aeroplane, passenger ferry, train and coach to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result and a completed test declaration. More information on these requirements can be found here. There are some limited exemptions to this requirement, listed on Dutch Government’s website.
    In addition, the Dutch government requires travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by aeroplane or ferry to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding. For transport sector personnel, the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test must have been conducted no more than 24 hours prior to boarding. If you have a negative LAMP test, you do not also need to provide a negative PCR or rapid antigen test. The Dutch government will not accept the results of self-administered tests. This applies to both the PCR and the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirements. There is an exemption for hauliers, for whom self-administered tests will be accepted.
    Most travellers will be required to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, even if exempt from taking a PCR COVID-19 test. There are some limited exemptions. Travellers, including transit passengers, should check the Dutch Government’s website for comprehensive information on testing requirements and exemptions. Hauliers, for example, are not required to show proof of a negative PCR test result and a completed test declaration, but, if arriving from the UK, will need to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test taken within the last 24 hours.
    More details on the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirement, including exemptions, are available on the Dutch Government’s website.

    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    The government advises against any travel to the Netherlands. If you need to travel, there are several conditions for entry: 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    If you are not a national of an EU or Schengen area country, the EU entry ban applies to you. You can only travel to the Netherlands if you fall into one of the exemption categories for the travel ban

    There is a ban on flights from the United Kingdom, Cabo Verde, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and all the countries in South America. There is also a docking ban for passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. Exemptions apply to certain limited categories of traveller. Dutch nationals are permitted to return to the Netherlands.

    Mandatory travel documentation:

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on thehere Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    -Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    -Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    26.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Rapid test required for travelers before entry from 23 January to at least 9 February (NL and You, 21.01.2021) Prime minister proposes flight ban for South Africa, South American countries, and U.K.from 23 January (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government will ban flights from non-Schengen countries from 23 January because of COVID-19 (Reuters, 20.01.2021). Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *Entry to the Netherlands: From Saturday 23 January 12:01pm (CET) a travel ban will be in effect for all passenger flights and passenger ferries from the United Kingdom. This means that no passengers will be allowed to travel to the Netherlands, apart from exceptional circumstances such as travel for medical reasons. Until that date, the below entry requirements including testing and self-isolation apply. Freight traffic is exempt from the travel ban.
    The Dutch Government has announced that from 1 January 2021, non-EU/EEA nationals and nationals of non-Schengen states, including UK nationals, will not be permitted entry to the Netherlands for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. Please see the Dutch Government’s website for a list of exemptions. International arrivals from outside the EU and Schengen countries remain subject to entry checks to prevent non-essential travel.
    The Dutch Government requires all international travellers aged 13 and above travelling by aeroplane, passenger ferry, train and coach to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result and a completed test declaration. More information on these requirements can be found here. There are some limited exemptions to this requirement, listed on Dutch Government’s website.
    In addition, the Dutch government requires travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by aeroplane or ferry to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding. For transport sector personnel, the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test must have been conducted no more than 24 hours prior to boarding. If you have a negative LAMP test, you do not also need to provide a negative PCR or rapid antigen test. The Dutch government will not accept the results of self-administered tests. This applies to both the PCR and the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirements. There is an exemption for hauliers, for whom self-administered tests will be accepted.
    Most travellers will be required to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test, even if exempt from taking a PCR COVID-19 test. There are some limited exemptions. Travellers, including transit passengers, should check the Dutch Government’s website for comprehensive information on testing requirements and exemptions. Hauliers, for example, are not required to show proof of a negative PCR test result and a completed test declaration, but, if arriving from the UK, will need to show proof of a negative rapid (antigen/LAMP) test taken within the last 24 hours.
    More details on the rapid (antigen/LAMP) test requirement, including exemptions, are available on the Dutch Government’s website.

    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Landing ban: From 23 January onwards passenger flights from countries with a significant spread of selected Covid-19 mutations are suspended. Currently, these countries concern: the United Kingdom, South Africa, Cape Verde, Dominican Republic, and the whole of South America. Travellers that arrive from one of these countries before 23 January, need to present a negative test result from a rapid test for SARS-CoV-2. This is in addition to the negative PCR test result (not older than 72 hours) and the negative test declaration.

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus, and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China are currently not required to present a negative test result or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    A signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    The Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on thehere Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    -Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    -Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    -Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 9 February. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only.
    A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    -Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
  • 22.01.2021
  • Netherlands Dutch airline KLM will halt all intercontinental flights and some of its European services from Friday this week. The move is part of the government’s requirement that all travelers, including crew, must undertake both a PCR and antigen test before flying. KLM says that the move is necessary to avoid crew being stranded overseas as a result.

    The Netherlands clamps down on COVID

    Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport is set to fall rather quiet at the end of this week as Dutch flag carrier KLM has announced it will bring most of its flying to a halt. The airline has taken the tough decision to suspend all intercontinental flights and some of its European flights in response to the government’s new COVID requirements.

    The Netherlands announced today that it would require all travelers, from all countries, to carry both a negative antigen test result and a negative PCR result before boarding a flight to the country. This is an expansion of the tighter testing requirements announced last week.

    Prime Minister Mark Rutte said today that the Dutch government would ban all flights from the UK, South Africa and South America for one month, starting on Saturday. The country has also implemented a strict curfew from 20:30 to 04:30 each day. The flight ban still has to be approved by parliament, which will be debated today.

    Read more
    21.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *The Dutch Government has announced that from 1 January 2021, non-EU/EEA nationals and nationals of non-Schengen states, including UK nationals, will not be permitted entry to the Netherlands for non-essential purposes due to EU-wide COVID-19 restrictions. Please see the Dutch Government’s website for a list of exemptions. International arrivals from outside the EU and Schengen countries remain subject to entry checks to prevent non-essential travel. This measure does not apply to UK nationals who are legally resident in the Netherlands, who will be allowed to re-enter the country. UK nationals who are legally resident in the Netherlands will, from 1 January 2021, have to demonstrate they have a residency permit, a certificate of application or a document with their address, and may be subject to questioning by Dutch border authorities when they arrive in the Netherlands.
    The Dutch Government requires all international travellers aged 13 and above travelling by aeroplane, passenger ferry, train and coach to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result and a completed test declaration. More information on these requirements can be found here. There are some limited exemptions to this requirement, listed on Dutch Government’s website.
    In addition, the Dutch government requires travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by aeroplane, to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen) test, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding.
    From 19 January 00:01 (CET), travellers aged 13 and above arriving from the UK by ferry will also have to provide proof of a negative rapid (antigen) test for COVID-19, taken no more than 4 hours before boarding. For transport sector personnel, the rapid (antigen) test must have been conducted no more than 24 hours prior to boarding the vessel.

    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
  • 18.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *A negative rapid antigen test will now be required from all travellers from the UK arriving by air from Friday 15 January
    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
  • 15.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government extends COVID-19 lockdown until 9 February (Reuters, 12.01.2021). Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    12.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    11.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Note: The Netherlands adopts its own national classification of risk areas, hence travel restrictions for the Netherlands are not based on the common “EU Traffic Lights” map.

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    08.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    The EU entry ban continues to apply. Travel to the Netherlands from outside the EU/Schengen area is only allowed for certain exemption categories.

    Travellers (plane, train, bus and boat) aged 13 or more, that are allowed entry to the Netherlands must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration. It does not matter what your nationality or the purpose of your trip is.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    05.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Health official says national lockdown likely to last until mid-February (Reuters, 31.12.2020). Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government requires all passengers (plane, train, bus and boat) from the UK aged 13 and above, including EU nationals, to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. This test should be taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature, if they are coming from a high-risk area outside the EU/Schengen area to the Netherlands.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration.

    The EU entry ban and the self-quarantine advice continue to apply. Only travellers who are exempt from the entry ban, are permitted to enter the Netherlands. 

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    04.01.2021
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government allows passengers from the UK with a negative COVID-19 test to travel to the Netherlands.

    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government requires all passengers (plane, train, bus and boat) from the UK aged 13 and above, including EU nationals, to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. This test should be taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. The government provides a list of countries concerned. This measure concerns passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government requires all passengers (plane, train, bus and boat) from the UK aged 13 and above, including EU nationals, to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. This test should be taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature, if they are coming from a high-risk area outside the EU/Schengen area to the Netherlands.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration.

    The EU entry ban and the self-quarantine advice continue to apply. Only travellers who are exempt from the entry ban, are permitted to enter the Netherlands. 

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    30.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government allows passengers from the UK with a negative COVID-19 test to travel to the Netherlands.

    *From within the EU:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government requires all passengers (plane, train, bus and boat) from the UK aged 13 and above, including EU nationals, to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. This test should be taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    Until 29 December, all travellers from high-risk areas, are asked to self-quarantine for 10 days, without the requirement of a negative test. The government provides a list of countries concerned

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, if they are coming from a high-risk area in the EU/Schengen area (with the exception of Iceland) to the Netherlands. This measure concerns all passenger transport by aircraft, ferry or international intercity train or coach, travelling more than 30km into the Netherlands from the border.

    This requirement applies to all passengers, including Dutch nationals and nationals of other EU and Schengen countries. If a passenger is unable to present a negative test result, they may not travel to the Netherlands and will not be permitted to board the aircraft or ferry.

    International train and coach passengers must be asked to present a recent negative test result before boarding or during the journey but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so they will be asked to leave the vehicle at the first stop after the border.

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s scheduled arrival in the Netherlands. The result must be known before the passenger departs for the Netherlands. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration. Please note: this is not the same as a “negative test declaration” which is required for non-EU/Schengen travellers.

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19
    FAQs about Tourism
    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point:
    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Specific measures for the new variant of coronavirus

    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government requires all passengers (plane, train, bus and boat) from the UK aged 13 and above, including EU nationals, to be in possession of a negative PCR COVID-19 test result. This test should be taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands.

    See also:
    Commission adopts Recommendation on EU coordinated approach to travel and transport in response to a new variant of coronavirus in the UK (22 December 2020)

    ____________________

    As of 29 December all people aged 13 or more must be able to present a negative COVID-19 test result, and a negative test declaration bearing their signature, if they are coming from a high-risk area outside the EU/Schengen area to the Netherlands.

    The requirement does not apply to people coming from a country outside the EU/Schengen area that is on the list of countries deemed ‘safe’ by the EU. This means people coming from Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand and China are currently not required to present a negative test result, or declaration.

    The EU entry ban and the self-quarantine advice continue to apply. Only travellers who are exempt from the entry ban, are permitted to enter the Netherlands. 

    In addition, everyone arriving in the Netherlands remains strongly advised to self-quarantine for a period of 10 days. The negative test required for boarding is not a substitute for self-quarantining on arrival. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. 

    Several exceptions to the testing requirement exist.  

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    The negative test result must be in English, German, French, Spanish or Dutch. The document must include the following information:

    • Type of test: the test must be a molecular PCR test and must be for SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19. No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid;
    • Test result: the test result must be negative (or not detected);
    • Passenger’s first and last name as stated in their passport;
    • Date and time the test was conducted: the test must have been conducted no more than 72 hours prior to the passenger’s arrival in the Netherlands.
    • Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test.

    Signed negative test declaration must be printed. Passengers must complete and sign a negative test declaration and carry a printed copy with them for the duration of their journey. It is not sufficient for them to present a digital version of the declaration on a smartphone or tablet. A negative test result may however be presented digitally.

    Passengers arriving in the Netherlands by air must also have filled in a health declaration

    Find out more:
    Dutch government on COVID-19

    Contact point:
    Contact form

     

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    28.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government will require negative COVID-19 tests from air passengers from 29 December (Reuters, 23.12.2020). Netherlands lifts flight ban from South Africa (NL Times, 23.12.2020). Eurostar trains scheduled for 22 December canceled (NL Times, 22.12.2020). Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    From Wednesday 23 December the Dutch Government allows passengers from the UK with a negative COVID-19 test to travel to the Netherlands.

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    All passengers from the United Kindgom, including EU nationals, are required to present a declaration of a recent negative PCR test.

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following third countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. For example, an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    24.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Dutch government bans all passenger flights from South Africa because of new variant of COVID-19 (Reuters, 21.12.2020). Dutch Government bans air passenger flights from UK from 0600 (CET) 20DDEC20 to 01JAN21; all passenger ferries are prohibited until 01JAN21 (Gov.UK, 21.12.2020). Five-week lockdown imposed as COVID-19 cases increase (Reuters, 16.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    The government of the Netherlands has announced a ban on passenger flights from the UK starting 0600 Dec. 20 until at least Jan. 1.

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    From 20.12.2020, flights from the United Kingdom are banned, due to the detection of a new virus strain that spreads more rapidly.

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following third countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. For example, an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    22.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Netherlands ban passenger flights from the U.K. from 20 December (Gov NL, 19.12.2020). Five-week lockdown imposed as COVID-19 cases increase (Reuters, 16.12.2020)

    International Restrictions:
    The government of the Netherlands has announced a ban on passenger flights from the UK starting 0600 Dec. 20 until at least Jan. 1.

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*.

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following third countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. For example, an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    As of Dec. 20, a nationwide lockdown imposed earlier continues to be in place as part of the country’s effort to counter increasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. The directive will remain in force through at least Jan. 19.
    All non-essential retail stores remain closed; essential retail businesses, such as supermarkets, bakeries, butcher shops, and pharmacies, may remain open. Cinemas, amusement parks, museums, and other similar facilities accessible to the public must close. Non-medical contact services, such as barbershops and hair salons, are closed; medical contact services, including dentist and physical therapist offices, may continue operating. All indoor and outdoor gatherings are limited to two persons; three persons may gather at private homes on Christmas. Hotels may operate but cannot serve food or drink. Libraries and community centers may operate under certain strict limitations.
    Schools at all education levels are restricted to conducting classes via distance learning techniques. Childcare availability is limited to the children of persons employed in essential professions.
    The new lockdown restrictions are in addition to measures already in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Under existing directives, all individuals are advised to stay home as much as possible and avoid nonessential travel. Anyone over the age of 13 must wear a protective face-covering in indoor public areas and on public transport. All food and beverage establishments are limited to takeout services only. Individuals must observe social distancing of 1.5 meters (5 feet) at all times, where possible.
    Authorities in the Netherlands may further update the nation’s COVID-related international travel regulations based on the recent lockdown declaration. As such, only travelers from European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as residents of Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Uruguay, remain permitted to enter. Exceptions may be made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces, freight workers, and diplomats, though all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival. Arrivals from the following countries must also self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival: Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Curacao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark: Copenhagen, Aarhus, Faaborg-Midtfyn, Greve, Koge, Slagelse, Solrod, Estonia, Finland: Helsinki-Uusimaa region, including the cities of Helsinki, Espoo, and Vantaa; France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland: counties Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, and Louth; Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Norway: Oslo, Vestland, Viken, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, except the Canary Islands, Sweden, Switzerland, The UK,• Non-EEA countries other than Australia, China, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, and Uruguay
    Authorities could reimpose, extend, further ease, or otherwise amend any restrictions with little-to-no notice depending on disease activity over the coming weeks.
    *Travel in the Netherlands: The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). Non-medical face masks must be worn in all publicly accessible indoor spaces, including on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask you might be fined €95. Additionally, on platforms and stations, social distancing of 1.5 metres must be observed. The Dutch government advises to limit your travel movements as much as possible. Public transport should be used for essential journeys only. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart where possible.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ must wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries: -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. On the Amsterdam – Newcastle route, passengers must wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey. -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Lockdown measures are in place across the Netherlands from 15 December until at least 19 January. A full overview of the current Dutch measures is available here. All shops selling non-essential items and public spaces are closed. Supermarkets, bakeries, butchers and other shops selling food remain open. Other shops remaining open include pharmacies, chemists and petrol stations. Restaurants and cafes remain open for takeaway only. A full list of venues and services affected by the lockdown can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). As of 1 December, wearing a face mask is compulsory for everyone aged 13 and over in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. You risk having to pay a €95 fine if you do not wear a face mask as directed. Outdoor group sizes are limited to no more than two people from different households. The Dutch government advises against all non-essential international travel until mid-March. Holiday travel is not classified as essential by the Dutch government as is stated here.
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to members of your household and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Hotels remain open, but hotel restaurants are closed and room service is unavailable.

    Read more
    20.12.2020
  • Netherlands COVID-19: Netherlands to go into strict lockdown for at least five weeks, with schools closed
    Gyms, hairdressers and cinemas will close, although supermarkets and banks can remain open.

    The Netherlands will enter a tough second lockdown for at least five weeks, the country’s prime minister has announced.

    Households have been urged to welcome no more than two visitors over the age of 13 from Tuesday, although an exception will be made for three days around Christmas when they can welcome three.

    In a rare televised address, marked by the sound of protesters banging pots and pans outside his office, Mark Rutte told the nation: “The Netherlands is closing down. We realise the gravity of our decisions, right before Christmas.”

    The Netherlands is the latest European country to announce it will be enforcing strict measures over the festive period following a spike in infections, with Germany earlier announcing similar restrictions.

    People in the Netherlands have been advised to stay at home, not travel to work, and to avoid contact with others as much as possible.

    All public places – including day care centres, gyms, museums, zoos, cinemas, hairdressers and beauty salons – will close until 19 January.

    Schools will also close until 18 January.
    Skynews.com

    Read more
    15.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*

    *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)

    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Restaurants and bars are currently closed. From 19 November, museums, cinemas and other attractions will be open with limits to group sizes and reservations mandatory. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    At present, the Dutch government strongly advises that face masks are worn in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. From 1 December wearing a face mask will be compulsory in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    01.12.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*

    *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)

    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Restaurants and bars are currently closed. From 19 November, museums, cinemas and other attractions will be open with limits to group sizes and reservations mandatory. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    At present, the Dutch government strongly advises that face masks are worn in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. From 1 December wearing a face mask will be compulsory in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    25.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU:

    Entry Restrictions

    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.

    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch).

    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch)

    Mandatory Travel Documentation

    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.

    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    Find out more:

    Dutch government on COVID-19

    FAQs about Tourism

    Netherlandsworldwide.nl

    Contact point for the Netherlands

    Contact form

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*

    *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).

    If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)

    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.

    Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Restaurants and bars are currently closed. From 19 November, museums, cinemas and other attractions will be open with limits to group sizes and reservations mandatory. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    At present, the Dutch government strongly advises that face masks are worn in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. From 1 December wearing a face mask will be compulsory in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    23.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. *Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl. *Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form.

    *Transit: Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and You and Netherlands Government.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: Restaurants and bars are currently closed. From 19 November, museums, cinemas and other attractions will be open with limits to group sizes and reservations mandatory. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    At present, the Dutch government strongly advises that face masks are worn in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. From 1 December wearing a face mask will be compulsory in all indoor public spaces. This includes shops, museums, cafes and theatres. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    19.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. *Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl. *Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form.

    *Transit: Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and You and Netherlands Government.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: As of 4 November, certain additional measures have been put in place in response to a recent increase in COVID-19 cases. These measures include limiting the size of groups meeting from different households and the closure of museums, cinemas and other attractions. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    You are required to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    11.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. *Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl. *Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form

    *Transit: Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and You and Netherlands Government

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports – All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries – The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    -Eurostar: All passengers aged 13+ must wear a face mask at Eurostar stations and on board trains. If you don’t have a mask you may be refused travel on Eurostar services.
    *Public Spaces and Services: As of 4 November, certain additional measures have been put in place in response to a recent increase in COVID-19 cases. These measures include limiting the size of groups meeting from different households and the closure of museums, cinemas and other attractions. Full details of these and other measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    You are required to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. This does not include children under the age of 13. The Dutch government is advising people to avoid travelling abroad unless your journey is essential. You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    06.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *From within the EU: Entry Restrictions- Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (in Dutch). Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch) Mandatory Travel Documentation- All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form.

    *Transit: Travellers from EU Member States + Schengen Associated countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, and China((*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    On 14 October, new national measures came into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. In general, you should: Travel as little as possible; Remain at the address at which you are staying as much as possible; Limit the number of outings and avoid busy places.
    There is now a requirement to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Retail shops must close at 8pm. Establishments serving food and drink must close except for takeaway service. For a full list of measures, consult the Dutch Government’s website. More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    03.11.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry is partially permitted.
    Entry Restrictions: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned.
    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.
    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.
    Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl .
    *Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form.

    *Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada (until 24.10.2020), Georgia (until 24.10.2020), Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia (until 24.10.2020), Uruguay, and China(*).
    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and here.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    On 14 October, new national measures came into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. In general, you should: Travel as little as possible; Remain at the address at which you are staying as much as possible; Limit the number of outings and avoid busy places.
    There is now a requirement to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Retail shops must close at 8pm. Establishments serving food and drink must close except for takeaway service. For a full list of measures, consult the Dutch Government’s website. More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    30.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry Restrictions: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.
    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.
    Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl .
    *Contact point for the Netherlands: Contact form.

    *Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada (until 24.10.2020), Georgia (until 24.10.2020), Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia (until 24.10.2020), Uruguay, and China(*).
    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and here.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    On 14 October, new national measures came into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. In general, you should: Travel as little as possible; Remain at the address at which you are staying as much as possible; Limit the number of outings and avoid busy places.
    There is now a requirement to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Retail shops must close at 8pm. Establishments serving food and drink must close except for takeaway service. For a full list of measures, consult the Dutch Government’s website. More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    27.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry Restrictions: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
    Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl (only in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft.
    Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.
    Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl .

    *Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and you and Government of the Netherlands.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    On 14 October, new national measures came into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. In general, you should: Travel as little as possible; Remain at the address at which you are staying as much as possible; Limit the number of outings and avoid busy places.
    There is now a requirement to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Retail shops must close at 8pm. Establishments serving food and drink must close except for takeaway service. For a full list of measures, consult the Dutch Government’s website. More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    23.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry Restrictions: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
    *Travelling from the Netherlands or returning to the Netherlands: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. The Dutch official travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemic.

    Countries are classified as: – Countries where there are no special security risks; – Countries that have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Countries where daily life is seriously disrupted. In addition, there may also be an entry ban for travellers from the Netherlands. Non-essential travel is advised against; – Countries where due to very serious safety risks all types of travel is strongly advised against. Travelling to countries or zones with a travel advisory compatible with the latter two categories is strongly discouraged. If this advice is issued based on increased spread of COVID-19 in that particular territory, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to a more severe level after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have a changed travel advice only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch).
    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl .

    *Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and you and Government of the Netherlands.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    On 14 October, new national measures came into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. In general, you should: Travel as little as possible; Remain at the address at which you are staying as much as possible; Limit the number of outings and avoid busy places.
    There is now a requirement to wear a mask in all indoor public spaces. Retail shops must close at 8pm. Establishments serving food and drink must close except for takeaway service. For a full list of measures, consult the Dutch Government’s website. More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.

    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    20.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    *Travel from the EU: Entry Restrictions: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. *Travelling from the Netherlands or returning to the Netherlands: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. The Dutch official travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemic. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is seriously disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban for travellers from the Netherlands. Non-essential travel is advised against; – Red: Due to very serious safety risks all types of travel is strongly advised against. There is no prospect of entry and exit. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is strongly discouraged. If this code is issued based on increased spread of COVID-19 in that particular territory, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch). *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. Find out more: Dutch government on COVID-19, FAQs about Tourism and Netherlandsworldwide.nl .

    *Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    *Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see Netherlands and you and Government of the Netherlands.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    New national measures have come into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections.
    *Rules indoors:
    • In all indoor public spaces, people are advised to wear a face mask. In indoor locations with allocated seats, such as restaurants or theatres, people can remove their face masks while seated, providing the 1.5 metre distancing rule can be complied with. As soon as a person leaves their allocated seat, for example to go to the toilet, they should put their face mask back on.
    • You can host no more than 3 guests in your home, garden or on your balcony. This is in addition to members of your own household and does not include children under the age of 13.
    • In other buildings, no more than 4 people can form a group. This does not include children under the age of 13.
    • The number of people in a room (e.g. a restaurant or cinema) is limited to 30 people.
    • Establishments serving food and drink can accept no new customers after 9pm and must be closed by 10pm.
    • Sports clubhouses will be closed.
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars must ask guests to provide their names and contact details for contact tracing by the municipal health service (GGD) in the event someone is infected.
    • Indoor spaces with a continuous flow of visitors, such as historic buildings, libraries and museums – but not retail businesses and markets – must operate using reservations on the basis of time slots.
    • People working in contact-based industries must ask their customers to provide their names and contact details.
    *Rules outdoors:
    • Numbers for outdoor activities where there is no continuous flow of people are limited to 40. This includes children under 13 but excludes staff.
    • Travel should be kept to a minimum
    More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    16.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU: Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino.
    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

    *Travelling from the Netherlands or returning to the Netherlands: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. The Dutch official travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemic. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is seriously disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban for travellers from the Netherlands. Non-essential travel is advised against; – Red: Due to very serious safety risks all types of travel is strongly advised against. There is no prospect of entry and exit. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is strongly discouraged. If this code is issued based on increased spread of COVID-19 in that particular territory, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch)

    *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. *Find out more: FAQs about Tourism and here

    Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China*.
    *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and here here.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Travel in the Netherlands:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours.
    For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    *Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports-
    All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    *Ferries-
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling.
    -DFDS
    All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks.
    -P&O
    All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    *Public Spaces and Services:
    New national measures have come into effect to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections.
    *Rules indoors:
    • In all indoor public spaces, people are advised to wear a face mask. In indoor locations with allocated seats, such as restaurants or theatres, people can remove their face masks while seated, providing the 1.5 metre distancing rule can be complied with. As soon as a person leaves their allocated seat, for example to go to the toilet, they should put their face mask back on.
    • You can host no more than 3 guests in your home, garden or on your balcony. This is in addition to members of your own household and does not include children under the age of 13.
    • In other buildings, no more than 4 people can form a group. This does not include children under the age of 13.
    • The number of people in a room (e.g. a restaurant or cinema) is limited to 30 people.
    • Establishments serving food and drink can accept no new customers after 9pm and must be closed by 10pm.
    • Sports clubhouses will be closed.
    • Restaurants, cafés and bars must ask guests to provide their names and contact details for contact tracing by the municipal health service (GGD) in the event someone is infected.
    • Indoor spaces with a continuous flow of visitors, such as historic buildings, libraries and museums – but not retail businesses and markets – must operate using reservations on the basis of time slots.
    • People working in contact-based industries must ask their customers to provide their names and contact details.
    *Rules outdoors:
    • Numbers for outdoor activities where there is no continuous flow of people are limited to 40. This includes children under 13 but excludes staff.
    • Travel should be kept to a minimum
    More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    You should check the latest local information before travelling, as individual regions might have imposed extra measures.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action.
    *Accommodation:
    Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    09.10.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    Travel from EU:
    Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions in the EU+ should self-quarantine for 10 days, even if they do not have any symptoms or if they have tested negative for COVID-19. Once in the Netherlands, you can self-quarantine at home or in temporary or holiday accommodation. The government provides a list of countries concerned. EU+ comprises EU Member States plus Norway, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, Vatican City State and the Republic of San Marino. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (in Dutch). Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. *Travelling from the Netherlands or returning to the Netherlands: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. The Dutch official travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemic. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is seriously disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban for travellers from the Netherlands. Non-essential travel is advised against; – Red: Due to very serious safety risks all types of travel is strongly advised against. There is no prospect of entry and exit. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is strongly discouraged. If this code is issued based on increased spread of COVID-19 in that particular territory, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel advice for individual countries (in Dutch). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here (only in Dutch) *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. *Find out more: FAQs about Tourism and here

    Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). If you transfer from a third country via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport to an onward non-Schengen destination, you have to stay in the non-Schengen transit zone and leave within 48 hours to a non-Schengen destination, being able to show proof of onward travel with a valid flight ticket and travel documents. If you transfer via Schiphol – Amsterdam airport in order to travel onward to another Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    From Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and here here.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    **Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    **Ferries: The wearing of face masks is mandatory on-board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. *DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.

    **Public Spaces and Services: New measures came into effect on 20 September to address a rise in the number of coronavirus infections. These measures apply to the six regions that are currently seeing the sharpest rise in the number of infections – Amsterdam-Amstelland, Rotterdam-Rijnmond, Haaglanden (The Hague), Utrecht, Kennemerland and Hollands Midden. Three general measures apply to all six regions: Bars, restaurants and other establishments will not admit new guests after midnight, and guests must leave by 1:00 AM. Groups of more than 50 people are banned. This restriction applies both indoors and outdoors. There are some exceptions, such as demonstrations, religious gatherings, funerals, and dance and theatre. Organisers of gatherings of more than 50 people must notify the authorities beforehand.
    More information on these measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English). These regions and others in the Netherlands may also have additional local requirements. You should check the latest local information before travelling.
    You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation, you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13. The Dutch government requires the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD)
    can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling.
    **Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    30.09.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Government tightens COVID-19 restrictions, recommends avoid nonessential travel to Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam (Reuters, 28.09.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    From the EU: Travelling to the Netherlands- The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, i