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Airlines Updates

11.09.2020 KLM yesterday (10SEP20) filed additional routing changes for service to South East Asia and Taiwan. Reported yesterday on Airlineroute, the airline was in the middle of the latest schedule update, resulting in certain South East Asia service displaying up to 2 daily flights available for reservation.

For Northern winter 2020/21 season, revised operational routing as of 10SEP20 as follows.

Amsterdam – Bangkok – Jakarta 25OCT20 – 06DEC20 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 26OCT20 – 05DEC20 3 weekly 777-200ER (1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER from 07DEC20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 25OCT20 – 05DEC20 4 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan 25OCT20 – 06DEC20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar eff 07DEC20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta eff 08DEC20 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila eff 08DEC20 1 daily 777-300ER

Published on 02.09.2020
TUIfly Netherlands Winter 2020/21 season Caribbean routing changes

Published on 29.08.2020
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines will resume its Amsterdam-Taoyuan passenger service, effective Sept. 1.

26.08.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines in the last few weeks adjusted Intercontinental operation for the remainder of Northern summer 2020 season. From 01SEP20 to 24OCT20, planned operation as follows.

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s planned operation, where it may not have passenger traffic rights on certain sectors and/or directions. Additional changes remain possible.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 28SEP20 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Accra 4 weekly 777-300ER (5 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER from 03OCT20)
Amsterdam – Accra – Lagos – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER until 12OCT20
Amsterdam – Atlanta 6 weekly 787-9 (1 daily from 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangalore 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Hong Kong 1 daily 777-200ER/787-9 (787-9 only from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Jakarta 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9 (777-200ER/787-9 from 01OCT20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 2 weekly 777-200ER/787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan 4 weekly 777-200ER/787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 4 weekly 787-9 until 28SEP20
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam eff 29SEP20 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-200/-300 (5 weekly from 15OCT20)
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9 (5 weekly from 09SEP20)
Amsterdam – Cairo eff 09SEP20 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Calgary 3 weekly A330-300 (4 weekly from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 2 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 01OCT20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 6 weekly 787-10 (1 daily from 13OCT20)
Amsterdam – Dammam – Muscat 2 weekly A330-200 until 26SEP20
Amsterdam – Delhi 6 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe 16SEP20 – 26SEP20 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Houston 6 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kigali – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER until 26SEP20
Amsterdam – Kigali – Entebbe – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 3 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 02OCT20)
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Bahrain 3 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Lima 6 weekly 777-300ER (1 daily from 10SEP20)
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 9 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 2 weekly 787-9 (3 weekly A330-200 from 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Mumbai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 4 weekly 787-10 (5 weekly from 04OCT20)
Amsterdam – New York JFK 2 daily 777-200ER/-300ER and 787-9/-10
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 4 weekly 787-10 (5 weekly from 28SEP20)
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Riyadh – Dammam – Amsterdam eff 28SEP20 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (777-200ER/-300ER from 30SEP20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Hangzhou 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Toronto 9 weekly 777-200ER/787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 27SEP20, 4 from 05OCT20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 3 weekly A330-300

KLM from late-August 2020 resumes service to Hangzhou, initially operating Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon – Hangzhou routing. Boeing 777-200ER aircraft will operate this route once weekly, with flight number changes at Seoul, effective 27AUG20.

KL857 AMS1855 – 1225+1ICN 772 4
KL821 ICN1350 – 1500HGH 772 5

KL822 HGH1850 – 2155ICN 772 5
KL858 ICN0025 – 0445AMS 772 6

KLM Royal Airlines from September 2020 resumes scheduled passenger service to Taiwan, effective from 01SEP20. Initially the Skyteam member operate Amsterdam – Bangkok – Taipei Taoyuan routing, on board Boeing 777-200ER and -300ER aircraft. 4 weekly flights will be operated between 01SEP20 and 24OCT20.

KL873 AMS2050 – 1250+1BKK1400+1 – 1835+1TPE 77W 35
KL873 AMS2050 – 1250+1BKK1400+1 – 1835+1TPE 772 27

KL874 TPE2010 – 2245BKK2355 – 0640+1AMS 77W 46
KL874 TPE2010 – 2245BKK2355 – 0640+1AMS 772 13

Published on 25.08.2020
KLM resumes Taipei service from Sep 2020

Published on 21.08.2020
KLM temporary resumes Cairo service in Sep/Oct 2020
Transavia Sep/Oct 2020 network resumptions as of 20AUG20

06.08.2020 KLM during the month of August 2020 plans to operate following European network, based on 02AUG20 OAG schedules listing. Effective dates noted in parenthesis represents “week of” (example: from 16AUG20 represents effective from the week of 16AUG20). Frequencies listed below mainly focus on the period of 09AUG20 – 29AUG20.

Due to various travel restrictions, last minute modification may occur. Selected routes will see variation of weekly frequency on selected week. KLM is a participanting carrier of Routes’ hybrid event “Routes Reconnected 2020“, scheduled virtually and in Amsterdam from 30NOV20 to 04DEC20.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Alesund 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante 11 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 26-28 weekly
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Belfast City 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Bergen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Bilbao 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Bologna 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 23 weekly
Amsterdam – Bremen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bristol 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Brussels 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bucharest 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Budapest 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Cardiff 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 28 weekly
Amsterdam – Cork 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dresden 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Dublin 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Durham/Tees Valley 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Genoa 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Helsinki 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Humberside 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Ibiza 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Istanbul 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Krakow 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Kristiansand 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds/Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Linkoping 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 21 weekly
Amsterdam – London City 7 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 26-27 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Madrid 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 11 weekly
Amsterdam – Manchester 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Montpellier 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Moscow Sheremetyevo 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Naples 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Norwich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Oslo 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Prague 16 weekly
Amsterdam – Rome 21 weekly
Amsterdam – St. Petersburg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 23AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sandefjord 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Split 13 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger 18 weekly (14 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Stockholm Arlanda 22 weekly (21 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 16 weekly (14 weekly from 16AUG20)
Amsterdam – Toulouse 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Turin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 10 weekly (11 weekly from 23AUG20)
Amsterdam – Venice 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Warsaw 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Wroclaw 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Zagreb 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 21 weekly

Published on 23.07.2020
KLM resumes Shanghai service from late-July 2020

Published on 21.07.2020
KLM resumes Southampton service from late-August 2020

17.07.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines this week filed additional changes to its planned Intercontinental operation, for August and September 2020. As of 16JUL20, planned operation as follows.

Ongoing travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation and passenger traffic rights.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Accra 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Atlanta 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangalore 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Hong Kong 1 daily 777-200ER/787-9 (until 27SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 3 weekly 787-9 (until 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam 1 weekly 787-9 (4 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam 5 weekly A330-200/-300 (3 weekly A330-300 from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9 (until 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza – Santiago de Chile eff 31AUG20 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Calgary 3 weekly A330-300
Amsterdam – Cape Town 1 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 1 daily 787-10 (6 weekly from 01SEP20)
Amsterdam – Delhi 6 weekly 777-300ER (777-200ER from 31AUG20)

Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Hong Kong eff 28SEP20 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kigali – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Kilimanjaro – Dar es Salaam – Amsterdam 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 3 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly from 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lima 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Mumbai 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 4 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – New York JFK 2 daily 777/787
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 777-200ER (1 daily from 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 4 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile 2 weekly 787-9 (until 30AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (1 of 7 weekly by -200ER from 03SEP20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER (777-300ER from 31AUG20)
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 3 weekly A330-300

15.07.2020 Transavia since June 2020 gradually resumed schedule operation. As of 12JUL20, the airline’s operation in July 2020 sees the airline operates 90 routes, although this number (as well as planned operational frequency listed below) varies due to ongoing travel restrictions.

Amsterdam – Alicante 15 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Bari 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Belgrade 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Chania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Corfu 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Faro 12 weekly
Amsterdam – Fuerteventura 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Funchal 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Girona 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 8 weekly

Amsterdam – Ibiza 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Innsbruck 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Irakleion 13 weekly
Amsterdam – Kalamata 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Kos 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lanzarote 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Larnaca 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Ljubljana 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Mahon 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 17 weekly
Amsterdam – Mykonos 3 weekly

Amsterdam – Naples 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Olbia 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Palma Mallorca 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Paphos 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Pisa 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Preveza 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Reykjavik Keflavik 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Rhodes 4 weekly

Amsterdam – Samos 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Santa Cruz de la Palma 2 weekly
Amsterdam – Seville 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Tenerife South 6 weekly
Amsterdam – Thessaloniki 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Thira 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Verona 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Zakynthos 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Alicante 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Athens 4 weekly
Eindhoven – Barcelona 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Bologna 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Faro 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Ibiza 8 weekly
Eindhoven – Irakleion 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Kos 3 weekly

Eindhoven – Lanzarote 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Lisbon 5 weekly
Eindhoven – Malaga 10 weekly
Eindhoven – Nice 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Palma Mallorca 7 weekly
Eindhoven – Rhodes 3 weekly

Eindhoven – Rijeka 3 weekly
Eindhoven – Seville 2 weekly

Eindhoven – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Eindhoven – Valencia 9 weekly
Eindhoven – Zakynthos 2 weekly
Groningen – Irakleion 2 weekly
Groningen – Palma Mallorca 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Al Hoceima 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Alicante 10 weekly
Rotterdam – Almeria 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Bergerac 3 weekly
Rotterdam – Brindisi 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Corfu 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Dubrovnik 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Faro 12 weekly
Rotterdam – Girona 7 weekly
Rotterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Ibiza 7 weekly

Rotterdam – Irakleion 5 weekly
Rotterdam – Kos 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Lisbon 3 weekly
Rotterdam – Malaga 10 weekly
Rotterdam – Nador 1 weekly
Rotterdam – Palermo 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Palma Mallorca 6 weekly
Rotterdam – Perugia 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Pula 5 weekly
Rotterdam – Split 6 weekly
Rotterdam – Tenerife South 2 weekly
Rotterdam – Valencia 4 weekly
Rotterdam – Zadar 3 weekly
Published on 08.07.2020
Belfast City Airport KLM flights to resume in August

07.07.2020 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines in July 2020 continues to restore various European service, which sees the airline operates 70 routes. Based on weekly frequency listing for the week of 19JUL20, KLM as of 03JUL20 schedules 591 weekly departure flights from Amsterdam, compared to 2117 weekly as of 03APR20 (on 90 routes).

Various travel restrictions continue to impact the airline’s operation.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 10 weekly
Amsterdam – Barcelona 15 weekly
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bergen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Bilbao 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bologna 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bristol 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Brussels 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bucharest 4 weekly (7 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Budapest 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Dublin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 11 weekly (14 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Genoa 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 6 weekly (7 weekly from 14JUL20)
Amsterdam – Helsinki 13 weekly (14 weekly from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Ibiza 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness 6 weekly (7 weekly from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Istanbul 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 9 weekly (7 weekly from 18JUL20)
Amsterdam – Krakow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds/Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 17 weekly
Amsterdam – London City eff 13JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Madrid 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Malaga 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Manchester 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 7 weekly (11 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Montpellier 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Nice 9 weekly
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 6 weekly (7 weekly from 19JUL20)
Amsterdam – Oslo 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 21 weekly
Amsterdam – Porto 5 weekly
Amsterdam – Prague 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Rome 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Split 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stockholm Arlanda 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Toulouse 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Venice 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Warsaw 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Zagreb 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 7 weekly
29.06.2020
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
has filed additional changes to its planned Inter-continental service for July and August 2020. As of 26JUN20, planned operation between 01JUL20 and 31AUG20 as follows. Due to various travel restrictions, certain service will operate as cargo-only flights.

Additional modification remains likely.

Amsterdam – Abu Dhabi – Muscat eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Accra 1 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 11JUL20, 4 weekly 777-300ER from 04AUG20
Amsterdam – Aruba – Curacao – Amsterdam A330-200 operates on 04JUL20
Amsterdam – Atlanta 5 weekly 787-9 (6 weekly 777-300ER/787-9 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bangalore eff 20JUL20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9 (1 daily from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 4 weekly 787-9 until 01AUG20
Amsterdam – Bogota 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota – Cartagena – Amsterdam eff 06JUL20 1 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bonaire – Aruba – Amsterdam eff 05JUL20 5 weekly A330-200/-300
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly 777-200ER (A330-300 from 20JUL20)
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 3 weekly 787-9 (4 weekly from 15JUL20)
Amsterdam – Calgary eff 09JUL20 2 weekly 777-200ER (A330-300 on 09JUL20, 3 weekly A330-300 from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 1 weekly 777-200ER (no operation 11JUL20 – 03AUG20, 3 weekly 777-200ER from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Chengdu eff 05AUG20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 3 weekly 787-10 (1 daily from 10JUL20)
Amsterdam – Curacao 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam eff 01JUL20 3 weekly 777-200ER (until 02AUG20)
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam – Kigali – Amsterdam eff 07AUG20 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam – Kilimanjaro – Amsterdam eff 03AUG20 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Delhi 4 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Entebbe eff 05AUG20 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Hong Kong 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 5 weekly 787-9 (6 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200 (4 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lagos 2 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly from 14JUL20)
Amsterdam – Lima 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal eff 15JUL20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Mumbai 4 weekly 777-200ER (5 weekly from 29JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nairobi 2 weekly 777-200ER (4 weekly 787-10 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – New York JFK 1 daily 787-10 (2 daily 777/787 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 787-9 (777-200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 1 weekly 777-200ER (-300ER on 03JUL20, 4 weekly 787-10 from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Quito 3 weekly 777-200ER (until 31JUL20)
Amsterdam – Quito – Guayaquil – Amsterdam eff 03AUG20 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Aruba – Amsterdam 2 weekly 787-9 (via Curacao on inbound on 03JUL20)
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Santiago de Chile eff 05AUG20 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 1 daily 777-300ER (5 weekly 777-300ER and 2 weekly -200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly 777-300ER and 2 weekly -200ER from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Denpasar eff 06JUL20 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore – Jakarta eff 07JUL20 3 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER (until 02AUG20)
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan – Manila eff 03AUG20 1 daily 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 6 weekly 777-300ER (1 daily from 21JUL20)
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver eff 07JUL20 3 weekly 787-10 (777-200ER from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 2 weekly 777-200ER (3 weekly A330-300 from 04AUG20)

Published on 24.06.2020
KLM to resume London-Amsterdam flights from 13 July

23.06.2020 TUI fly Netherlands has outlined planned operation when it resumes scheduled service on 01JUL20. For the month of July and August 2020, the airline initially plans to operate following routes. Further changes remain likely, based on possible changes to travel restrictions. Information is based on 21JUN20 OAG schedules update.

Amsterdam – Antalya eff 10JUL20 4 weekly 737-800/767 (5 weekly from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Bodrum eff 13JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Bodrum – Dalaman – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 767
Amsterdam – Bonaire eff 09JUL20 1 weekly 787-8
Amsterdam – Bourgas eff 09JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Corfu – Preveza – Amsterdam eff 18JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Curacao eff 02JUL20 3 weekly 787-8 (4 weekly from 26JUL20)
Amsterdam – Curacao – Aruba – Amsterdam eff 21JUL20 1 weekly 787-8
Amsterdam – Dalaman eff 22JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Enfidha eff 21JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Gran Canaria/Las Palmas eff 03JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (5 weekly 737/787-8 from 19JUL20, 7 weekly from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Ibiza eff 10JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Irakleion eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly from 13JUL20, 5 weekly 737/787-8 from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Izmir eff 11JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Izmir – Antalya – Amsterdam eff 05AUG20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Karpathos eff 06AUG20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Karpathos – Chania – Amsterdam eff 19JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Kefallinia – Zakynthos – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Kos eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (4 weekly 737/767 from 18JUL20, 5 weekly from 03AUG20)
Amsterdam – Lanzarote – Fuerteventura – Amsterdam eff 16JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Marsa Alam – Hurghada – Amsterdam eff 18JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Ohrid eff 14JUL20 2 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Palma Mallorca eff 01JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Paphos eff 09JUL20 2 weekly 737-800/767
Amsterdam – Rhodes eff 02JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly 737/787-8 from 05AUG20)
Amsterdam – Samos – Mytilene – Amsterdam eff 17JUL20 1 weekly 737-800 (2 weekly from 04AUG20)
Amsterdam – Sao Vicente – Ilha do Sal – Amsterdam eff 27JUL20 1 weekly 737-800
Amsterdam – Tenerife South eff 03JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (3 weekly 737-800/787-8 from 12JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zakynthos eff 04JUL20 2 weekly 737-800 (1 weekly from 20JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zakynthos – Kefallinia – Amsterdam eff 20JUL20 1 weekly 737-80023.06.20202 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines earlier this month extended interim operation to 02AUG20, as the airline continues to restore various destinations in July 2020. On Inter-continental routes, planned operation for the month of July 2020 as follows.

Due to various traffic restrictions, certain routes listed below is only operating as cargo service. Flights to Mainland China in the list only represents passenger service.

Amsterdam – Accra 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Aruba – Bonaire – Amsterdam 4 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Atlanta 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Kuala Lumpur 3 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bangkok – Manila 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Bogota 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Boston 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Buenos Aires Ezeiza 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Calgary 2 weekly 777-200ER (from 09JUL20)
Amsterdam – Cape Town 4 weekly 777-200ER (from 21JUL20)
Amsterdam – Chicago O’Hare 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Curacao 5 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Dar es Salaam 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Delhi 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Dubai 1 daily 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Hong Kong 1 daily 787-9
Amsterdam – Houston 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Johannesburg 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Kuwait City – Dammam – Amsterdam 2 weekly A330-200
Amsterdam – Lagos 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Lima 4 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Los Angeles 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Mexico City 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Montreal 1 daily A330-200 (from 13JUL20)
Amsterdam – Mumbai 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Nairobi 2 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – New York JFK 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Osaka Kansai 5 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – Panama City 4 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Paramaribo 1 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Quito 3 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Rio de Janeiro Galeao 4 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – St. Maarten – Curacao – Amsterdam 2 weekly 787-9
Amsterdam – San Francisco 3 weekly 787-10
Amsterdam – Sao Paulo Guarulhos 6 weekly 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Seoul Incheon 5 weekly 777-200ER
Amsterdam – Shanghai Pu Dong 1 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Singapore 1 daily 777-300ER
Amsterdam – Taipei Taoyuan 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Tokyo Narita 6 weekly 777-200ER/-300ER
Amsterdam – Toronto 1 daily 787-10
Amsterdam – Vancouver 3 weekly 787-10 (from 07JUL20)
Amsterdam – Washington Dulles 2 weekly 777-200ER
16.06.2020 KLM

KLM in June and July 2020 is gradually resuming additional European routes. As of 12JUN20, KLM’s European service sees 70 routes with 385 weekly departures from Amsterdam, for the week of 14JUN20. Additional routes and frequencies will be restored from 01JUL20, which sees up to 611 weekly departures on 73 routes for the week of 05JUL20.

Due to various travel restrictions, passenger traffic rights may be impacted and further modification remains likely. Routes to be resumed in July 2020 is listed as eff 01JUL20, but not necessary means first resumed flight operates on 01JUL20.

Amsterdam – Aalborg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Aberdeen 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Alicante eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Athens 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Barcelona 7 weekly (15 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Basel/Mulhouse 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bergen 6 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Berlin Tegel 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bilbao eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Billund 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Birmingham 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Bordeaux 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Brussels 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Bucharest 4 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Budapest 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Cagliari eff 01JUL20 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Catania 2 weekly (4 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Copenhagen 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Dublin 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Dusseldorf 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Edinburgh 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Florence 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Frankfurt 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gdansk eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Geneva 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Glasgow 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Gothenburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hamburg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Hannover 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Helsinki 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Ibiza eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – Inverness eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Istanbul eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Krakow eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Kyiv Borispil 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Leeds Bradford 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lisbon 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – London City 42 weekly
Amsterdam – London Heathrow 14 weekly
Amsterdam – Luxembourg 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Lyon 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Madrid 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Manchester 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Milan Malpensa 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Montpellier 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Moscow Sheremetyevo eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Munich 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Newcastle 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nice 2 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Nuremberg 5 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Oslo 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Paris CDG 13 weekly (21 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Prague 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Rome 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Split eff 01JUL20 8 weekly
Amsterdam – St. Petersburg eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stavanger eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Stockholm 7 weekly (14 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Stuttgart 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Toulouse eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Trondheim eff 01JUL20 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Valencia eff 01JUL20 4 weekly
Amsterdam – Venice 7 weekly
Amsterdam – Vienna 6 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Warsaw 4 weekly (7 weekly from 01JUL20)
Amsterdam – Zagreb eff 01JUL20 3 weekly
Amsterdam – Zurich 7 weekly

07.06.2020

  • Alicante, Spain;
  • Bologna, Italy;
  • Ibiza, Spain;
  • Istanbul, Turkey;
  • Split, Croatia.

The airline also has plans to open up in other regions as well.

KLM goes intercontinental

For July, KLM has planned an additional six routes. It will fly to:

  • Calgary, Canada;
  • Denpasar, Indonesia;
  • Jakarta, Indonesia;
  • San Francisco, US;
  • Vancouver, Canada;
  • Washington, US.

Published on 04.06.2020

KLM resumes additional Caribbean passenger service in June 2020

Published on 02.06.2020
KLM to resume additional flights to southern Europe in July

Published on 28.05.2020
Air France-KLM will resume flights to and from Italy from 1 June

Read more
Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Netherlands
Crossing Rules
  • Passengers are not permitted to enter the Netherlands.
  • This does not apply to the following passengers:
    • Nationals and residents of the Netherlands,
    • Nationals and residents of the European Union, the Schengen Area, and the United Kingdom and their family members,
    • Residents of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay,
    • Passengers in transit,
    • Passengers who are essential personnel or highly qualified workers whose work cannot be performed abroad,
    • Diplomats,
    • Staff of international organisations,
    • Passengers traveling for emergency family situations,
    • Partners of a national of a European Union or Schengen Area member state residing in the Netherlands, provided they are holding a completed “Declaration of relationship for COVID-19 entry ban exemption” form here,
    • Passengers traveling for humanitarian reasons,
    • Seamen,
    • Seasonal workers for agriculture,
    • Passengers traveling or the purpose of study.
Read more
Movement restrictions

National movement restrictions: Free

Restrictive measures mandatory between 11 May 2020 to 31 December 2020

You receive a maximum of 6 people in your house or garden.
Keep 1.5 meters away.
Children up to the age of 13 do not count.
People who live in your house don’t count either.
Ask your visit if they don’t have a fever or a cold.

Working at home
Keep working from home as much as possible.

Do not forget:
Stay at home in case of complaints and get tested.
Keep 1.5 meters away from others.
Also when visiting at home.
Stay away from crowded places.
Wash your hands often.
Work from home as much as possible.

International movement restrictions: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 15 June 2020 to 31 December 2020

Have you been on holiday in an area with a lot of infections?

Stay at home for 10 days.
Get tested.

From June 15 traveling within Europe is possible in the following countries: Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Estonia, France, Iceland, Italy, Croatia, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, the Czech Republic and Switzerland. Traveling outside Europe is not recommended to limit the risks of a new outbreak.
From June 15 tourists are allowed to travel to the Netherlands this summer. But only tourists from countries with about the same situation as in the Netherlands and must adhere to the Dutch rules.

As of 1 July 2020, the Netherlands has lifted the travel ban for travelers who reside permanently in the following countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay. For travelers from China, the entry ban will be lifted as soon as the country also allows EU citizens.
Exceptions apply for specific cases.
The Netherlands has reintroduced the entry ban for Serbia and Montenegro on 8 July 2020.
The Netherlands has reintroduced the entry ban for Algeria on 5 August 2020 at midnight.
Travellers arriving in the Netherlands from certain countries and regions are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days. Even if you do not have any symptoms or if you have tested negative for COVID-19. This applies to anyone aged 13 and over. You are strongly advised to self-quarantine if you’re travelling from:

Sweden
Romania
Bulgaria
Croatia
3 areas in Spain (Segrià, La Mariña-Lugo and Barcelona)
1 area in Portugal (Vale do Tejo, this includes Lisbon)
1 area in the United Kingdom (Leicester)
1 area in Belgium (Antwerp);
countries outside the EU, the Schengen area and the United Kingdom.

Read more
Flight Restrictions

published 26.08.2020

Passengers are not allowed to enter.
– This does not apply to students with a notification letter issued by the Immigration and Naturalisation Service (IND). The letter must be stated in Dutch and contain as from 3 July 2020 an English textblock.
– This does not apply to partners with a completed “Declaration of relationship for COVID-19 entry ban exemption” form, a return onward ticket and proof that they have been in a relationship for at least 3 months with a resident of the Netherlands who is a national of an EEA Member State or Switzerland. As well as accompanying children of the partner who are younger than 18 years. More details can be found at: government.nl

A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk COVID-19 countries must be presented prior to boarding. The form can be found at government.nl.
– This does not apply to passengers younger than 13 years.

Read more
Quarantine

Self-isolation at own accommodation- subject to categorization.

The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map
providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here.

Read more
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification not required / not known.

Vaccination

Yellow fever (2019)
Country requirement at entry: no
WHO vaccination recommendation: no

Shop and Events

Non-essential shops closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 01 June 2020 to 31 December 2020

General rule:

We keep 1.5 meters away from others.
Maximum 100 people per room with fixed seats (excluding staff).
No maximum number of people under the following conditions: fixed seats, reservation and health check in advance.
In shops, museums, libraries and other locations with flow of visitors, 1.5 meters away is the rule (locations themselves ensure compliance with this rule). There is no maximum number of people.

Events stop: Partially banned

Restrictive measures mandatory between 19 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Parties for large groups:
Prefer to celebrate parties for large groups in a room.
Then the following rules apply:

Everyone has a fixed seat.
Upon arrival, visitors are asked about their health.
For example, whether they have a fever. Or have a cold.
Visitors provide their address and telephone number.

In addition, the ban on shouting and singing in groups, also called the ban on cheering at demonstrations, sports competitions and concerts, continues to apply.

Read more
Schools/Univercity closure

Schools/Univ. closure: Open

Restrictive measures mandatory between 18 August 2020 to 31 December 2020

Schools work on a safe environment:

Children with complaints stay at home.
Does anyone in the family have corona?
Even then children stay at home.

When back from holidays Children from 0 to 4 years old are allowed to go to childcare and sports.
Children aged 4 to 12 are allowed to go to school.
And they are also allowed to go to childcare and sports.

Read more
Other

Other: closed/cancelled

Restrictive measures mandatory between to TBD

Full Restrictions

  • Netherlands Latest News: Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    **Travelling from the EU: Travelling to the Netherlands
    The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see please see here (only in Dutch). Travel advice for individual countries. *Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. *Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China. The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Countries: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China. The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and .

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    **Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    **Ferries: The wearing of face masks is mandatory on-board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. *DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    **Public Spaces and Services: You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation, you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13.
    The Dutch government requires the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD)
    can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling.
    **Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    18.09.2020
  • Netherlands Latest News: Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    International Restrictions:

    **Travellers from the EU: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map
    providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here . Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel avice for individual countries here . **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China- (the condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*) (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and government website.

    Internal Restrictions:
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English).
    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    **Schiphol, Eindhoven and Rotterdam Airports: All passengers and staff aged 13+ are urged to wear face masks in all areas of these airports. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    **Ferries: The wearing of face masks is mandatory on-board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. *DFDS: All travellers must wear face coverings at check-in, whilst boarding, and during disembarkation. This applies for both foot- and car passengers, as well as freight drivers. DFDS also highly encourages travellers to wear face coverings whilst moving around the ship. Face coverings do not need to be worn when travellers are in their cabins, seated in a socially distanced manner or whilst social distancing on outside decks. *P&O: All travellers must wear a face mask during their journey.
    **Public Spaces and Services: You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation, you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13.
    The Dutch government requires the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.
    Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD)
    can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling.
    **Accommodation: Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here
    and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here.

    Read more
    15.09.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map
    providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here . Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel avice for individual countries here . **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China- (the condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*) (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here and government website.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    Schiphol Airport: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+ at the check-in desks, security checks and boarding areas. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Eindhoven and Rotterdam airports: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+. The mask must be worn in the terminals. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. Passengers must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13. Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD) can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. Foreign travellers are not obliged to reserve their accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands.

    Read more
    11.09.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map
    providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see here . Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. Travel avice for individual countries here . **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening form before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see here .

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    Schiphol Airport: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+ at the check-in desks, security checks and boarding areas. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Eindhoven and Rotterdam airports: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+. The mask must be worn in the terminals. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. Passengers must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13. Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD) can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. Foreign travellers are not obliged to reserve their accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands.

    Read more
    07.09.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/coronavirus-veelgestelde-vragen-reizen-naar-het-buitenland] providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl] Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. Travel avice for individual countries: [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] provides an indication of the security situation [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/wat-betekenen-de-kleurcodes-bij-reisadviezen] in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands] before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask.
    If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households.
    On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.
    Schiphol Airport: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+ at the check-in desks, security checks and boarding areas. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    Eindhoven and Rotterdam airports: the wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+. The mask must be worn in the terminals. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. Passengers must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility.
    The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board ferries and in ferry terminals. Check with your operator for details before travelling. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. In your own home or accommodation you may receive no more than 6 guests, excluding children under 13. Reservations must be made (either in advance or at the door) for restaurants, cafés and bars. All places must carry out pre-entry health checks and have assigned seating for customers (at either a table or the bar). This applies both outdoors and indoors and regardless of the size of the establishment. Customers must also provide their names and contact details so that the municipal health service Gemeentelijke Gezondheidsdienst (GGD) can contact them if an outbreak is traced to that establishment.
    Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. Foreign travellers are not obliged to reserve their accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands.

    Read more
    02.09.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in different categories. An updated map [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/coronavirus-veelgestelde-vragen-reizen-naar-het-buitenland] providing travel advice is available from the joint website of all Dutch representations worldwide. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl] Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. Travel avice for individual countries: [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] provides an indication of the security situation [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/wat-betekenen-de-kleurcodes-bij-reisadviezen] in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands] before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens.) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    01.09.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU:The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in four categories [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open]. For each category, a different warning level is defined. Travellers from countries classified as ‘green’ or ‘yellow’ can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta, Romania and Spain are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of 10 days is advised). Travellers from selected areas in Belgium, France, Portugal and Sweden are also strongly advised to self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. Due to restrictive measures applied to Dutch travellers, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Iceland, Slovenia and UK are classified as ‘orange’. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl] (only in Dutch). Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 10 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands.
    This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after arrival to the Netherlands. As an exception, no quarantine is required when returning from countries that have been set ‘orange’ only to flag the enforcement of restrictive measures for Dutch travellers in those countries.
    For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands] before starting their flight. Travellers reporting COVID-like symptoms will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance of the airport and in the airport building itself, during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address. Find out more [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tourism-in-the-netherlands].

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China- *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In genera, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals:Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*) The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    31.08.2020
  • Netherlands Foreign Ministry issues alert advising against nonessential travel to Spain, including the Canary Islands, because of COVID-19. (Murcia Today, 25.08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from Schengen area countries, the EU, and the UK are allowed to enter the Netherlands. The Netherlands divides areas and countries [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open], depending on their epidemiological situation, in four categories. For each category, a different warning level is defined. Travellers from countries classified as ‘green’ or ‘yellow’ can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta and Romania are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of 14 days is advised). For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 14 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after your arrival to the Netherlands. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation:
    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands]. Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In genera, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    24.08.2020
  • Netherlands Netherlands lifts quarantine guidelines for (most) visitors from Sweden (The Local, 18, 08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from Schengen area countries, the EU, and the UK are allowed to enter the Netherlands. The Netherlands divides areas and countries [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open], depending on their epidemiological situation, in four categories. For each category, a different warning level is defined. Travellers from countries classified as ‘green’ or ‘yellow’ can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta and Romania are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of 14 days is advised). Travellers from selected areas in Belgium, France, Portugal, Spain and Sweden are also strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. Due to restrictive measures applied to Dutch travellers, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Iceland are classified as ‘orange’. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 14 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after your arrival to the Netherlands. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation:
    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands]. Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In genera, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    21.08.2020
  • Netherlands Netherlands lifts quarantine guidelines for (most) visitors from Sweden (The Local, 18, 08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Entry from EU and EEA countries is, in general, allowed. The Netherlands divides areas and countries [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open], depending on their epidemiological situation, in four categories. For each category, a different warning level is defined. Travellers from countries classified as ‘green’ or ‘yellow’ can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta and Romania are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of 14 days is advised). Travellers from selected areas in Belgium, France, Portugal, Spain and Sweden are also strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. Due to restrictive measures applied to Dutch travellers, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania and Iceland are classified as ‘orange’. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 14 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after your arrival to the Netherlands. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice provides an indication of the security situation in a country in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation
    All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands]. Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In genera, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl]

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.
    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    20.08.2020
  • Netherlands Netherlands lifts quarantine guidelines for (most) visitors from Sweden (The Local, 18, 08.2020) The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Entry from EU and EEA countries isountries-whose-borders-are-open] For each category, a different warning level is defined. Travellers from countries classified as ‘green’ or ‘yellow’ can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta, Romania and Sweden are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of 14 days is advised). Travellers from selected areas in Belgium, France, Portugal and Spain are also strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands., in general, allowed. The Netherlands divides areas and countries, depending on their epidemiological situation, in four categories. Due to restrictive measures applied to Dutch travellers, Estonia, Finland, Latvia and Lithuania are also classified as ‘orange’. Travelling to countries or zones with an ‘orange’ or ‘red’ travel advisory is discouraged. If you do go, you are strongly advised to self-quarantine at home for 14 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. This rule applies also if the travel advisory changes to ‘orange’ after your arrival to the Netherlands. Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] provides an indication of the security situation in a country [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/wat-betekenen-de-kleurcodes-bij-reisadviezen]. in relation to the coronavirus pandemics. Countries are classified as: – Green: no special security risks; – Yellow: these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; – Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; – Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands] Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (*The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.

    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    18.08.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Travelling to and from EU and EEA countries is, in general, allowed. Depending on their epidemiological situation, the Netherlands divides countries in four categories [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open] green, yellow, orange and red. For each category, a different set of rules applies. Travellers from countries classified as “yellow” can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Bulgaria, Croatia, Malta, Romania and Sweden are classified as ‘orange’ (a self-quarantine of14 days is advised). Travellers from selected areas in Spain (Greater Barcelona and Segrià), Portugal (Vale do Tejo, including Lisbon), Belgium (province of Antwerp), and the United Kingdom (Leicester), are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. Due to restrictive measures applied to Dutch travellers, Estonia, Finland, Latvia and Lithuania are also classified as ‘orange’. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl] **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] has four colours: green, yellow, orange and red. These colours indicate the security situation in a country [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/wat-betekenen-de-kleurcodes-bij-reisadviezen]. Yellow: in connection with coronavirus, these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life; Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban; Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands] Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens) Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.

    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    13.08.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Travelling to and from EU and EEA countries is, in general, allowed. Depending on their epidemiological situation, the Netherlands divides countries in four categories [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open] green, yellow, orange and red. For each category, a different set of rules applies. Travellers from countries classified as “yellow” can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Sweden, Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia will remain ‘orange’ for the time being. Travellers from selected areas in Spain (Greater Barcelona and Segrià), Portugal (Vale do Tejo, including Lisbon), Belgium (province of Antwerp), and the United Kingdom (Leicester), are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands.For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl] (in Dutch). **Rules and Exceptions: Foreign travellers from countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands can enter the Netherlands for tourism. Everyone must follow the Dutch advice and rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The travel advice [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] has four colours: green, yellow, orange and red. These colours indicate the security situation in a country [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/documenten/vragen-en-antwoorden/wat-betekenen-de-kleurcodes-bij-reisadviezen]. Yellow: in connection with coronavirus, these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life;Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban;Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit.**Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands]. Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In genera, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nlMore info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask.

    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    11.08.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Travelling to and from EU and EEA countries is, in general, allowed. Depending on their epidemiological situation, the Netherlands divides countries in four categories [https://www.netherlandsworldwide.nl/latest/news/2020/06/15/going-on-holiday-abroad-countries-whose-borders-are-open]: green, yellow, orange and red. For each category, a different set of rules applies. Travellers from countries classified as “yellow” can enter the Netherlands without any restrictions. Sweden, Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia will remain ‘orange’ for the time being. Travellers from selected areas in Spain (Greater Barcelona and Segrià), Portugal (Vale do Tejo, including Lisbon), Belgium (province of Antwerp), and the United Kingdom (Leicester), are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. For some areas of the Caribbean parts of the Kingdom certain restrictions apply, please see [www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl]. **Rules and Exceptions: The travel advice [https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen] has four colours: green, yellow, orange and red. These colours indicate the security situation in a country: Yellow: in connection with coronavirus, these countries have taken measures that have a limited impact on daily life;Orange: daily life is disrupted in these countries. There may also be an entry ban;Red: this country or area is completely closed. There is no prospect of entry and exit. **Mandatory Travel Documentation: All passengers aged 13 and above travelling to and from Dutch airports must fill in a Health Screening Form [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands]. Fill in and sign the form before your flight. If you report symptoms on the form that suggest you may have COVID-19, you will not be allowed to board the aircraft. Your Health Screening Form may be checked at the entrance to the airport and in the airport building itself, such as during check-in and boarding. At the destination airport, passengers will be randomly selected and asked to show their form. You will also need a completed Health Screening Form for the return journey. You are advised to take a blank form with you in case you are unable to download and print a form at your holiday address.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China (the condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). In general, when transferring at Schiphol airport from a third country to a Schengen country, the Dutch entry conditions apply.

    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(the condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl. As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement around the country: You can use public transport, but peak hours should be avoided. People aged 13 or over must wear a non-medical face mask on public transport. People from different households can travel in the same car. Anyone aged 13 or over is advised to wear a non-medical face mask in this situation. If you are in a car on your own, or with members of your own household only, you don’t need to wear a non-medical face mask. Taxi passengers must undergo a pre-travel health check and wear a non-medical face mask

    The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. You must stay 1.5 metres away from other people. This applies to everyone over the age of 18: in the street, in shops and other buildings. It does not apply to family members or other people that you live with and it does not apply if you are providing assistance to someone, for example pushing a wheelchair. If you notice that it is becoming difficult to keep a distance of 1.5 metres, you should leave. Avoid busy places in general, as if a gathering poses a safety or public health risk, enforcement officers can take action. The Dutch government recommends the use of non-medical mouth/nose masks on public transport. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here. Certain towns and cities in the Netherlands may have their own local requirements. You are advised to check the latest local information before travelling. **Amsterdam: From 5 August 2020, all people aged 13 and over must wear a face mask in certain places in Amsterdam where it can be particularly busy. The municipal authorities have posted details on their website [https://www.amsterdam.nl/en/coronavirus/more-about-face-masks-mandatory-parts/] including a map of where face masks must be worn. This measure is in addition to the existing 1.5 metre distancing rule.

    Read more
    07.08.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, travellers from Bulgaria, Romania, Sweden, and Croatia, selected areas in Spain (e.g. Greater Barcelona and Segrià ), 1 area in Portugal (Vale do Tejo, this includes Lisbon), 1 area in Belgium (province of Antwerp), and 1 area in the United Kingdom (Leicester), are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days on arrival in the Netherlands. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. Travellers to or from the Netherlands, in particular Dutch nationals or long-term residents, should anyhow check the latest information on travel advice (with particular reference to yellow, orange, and red travel advisory zones at www.government.nl and [www.netherlandsworldwide.nl].Travelling to countries or zones with an orange or red travel advisory is discouraged because of the risks. If you do go, you are strongly advised to go into self-quarantine at home for 14 days immediately after returning to the Netherlands. It does not matter whether a country already had an orange travel advisory when you arrived there or this changed during your stay. In both cases you must self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving in the Netherlands. This also applies if you return home immediately if an advisory changes to orange.

    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Also, with a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*) (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl. As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement throughout the country is allowed. The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tourism-in-the-netherlands] and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands/basic-rules-for-everyone].

    Read more
    30.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    From 10 July, passengers travelling to the Netherlands from the UK are no longer advised by the Dutch government to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. The exception is travellers from Leicester, who are strongly advised to self-quarantine for 14 days on arrival in the Netherlands. Check the Dutch Government website [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands/travel-and-holidays/visiting-the-netherlands].
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom and two areas in Portugal (Portugal Norte and Vale do Tejo, this includes travellers from Lisbon and Porto) are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).
    Also, with a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*). (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl]. As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf]. and the extension on 16 July [https://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9596-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement throughout the country is allowed. The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tourism-in-the-netherlands] and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands/basic-rules-for-everyone].

    Read more
    29.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom and two areas in Portugal (Portugal Norte and Vale do Tejo, this includes travellers from Lisbon and Porto) are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).
    Also, with a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*). (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement throughout the country is allowed. The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. Foreign tourists are not obliged to reserve their holiday accommodation before travelling to the Netherlands. More information on visiting the Netherlands as a tourist can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tourism-in-the-netherlands] and more information on Dutch coronavirus measures can be found here [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands/basic-rules-for-everyone].

    Read more
    23.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    **Travellers from the EU: Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom and two areas in Portugal (Portugal Norte and Vale do Tejo, this includes travellers from Lisbon and Porto) are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens).
    Also, with a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    **Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*). (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see [https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl] and [https://www.government.nl].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Movement throughout the country is allowed. The latest information on Dutch domestic coronavirus measures can be found on the Dutch government website (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart.

    Read more
    15.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    Travellers from the EU: Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom and two areas in Portugal (Portugal Norte and Vale do Tejo, this includes travellers from Lisbon and Porto) are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    Transit: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are also allowed to transit the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China* *The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens). Also, with a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    Third Country Nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and China(*)
    (*)The condition of reciprocity explicitly applies to China: the EU will only open to China when China opens to EU citizens. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, and a list of exceptional categories, please see https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl and https://www.government.nl
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. Schipol Airport: The wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+ at the check-in desks, security checks and boarding areas. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board and in the ferry terminals with both P&O and Stena Line.

    Read more
    13.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. With a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country.
    For third country nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, please see here: https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl/travel-and-residence/visas-for-the-netherlands/qas-travel-restrictions-for-the-netherlands and here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/news/2020/06/30/the-netherlands-lift-travel-ban-for-certain-groups-of-travellers.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    Non-medical face masks must be worn on public transport if you are aged 13 and over. If you do not wear a face mask on public transport you can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but you must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Buses, trains, trams and metros can now operate at full capacity. However, you should avoid using public transport during peak hours. For other shared forms of transport, such as taxis, passenger vans and coaches, reservations should be made in advance and you must wear a non-medical face mask. If you’re travelling in a car or other private vehicle, you are advised to wear non-medical face masks if there are two or more people in the vehicle who belong to different households. On other forms of transport, you must stay 1.5 metres apart. Schipol Airport: The wearing of face masks is compulsory for all travellers aged 13+ at the check-in desks, security checks and boarding areas. The terminals are only open for passengers and staff. You must not be accompanied into the airport, unless absolutely necessary for a traveller with reduced mobility. The wearing of face masks is mandatory on board and in the ferry terminals with both P&O and Stena Line.

    Read more
    10.07.2020
  • Netherlands The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro again on Wednesday 8 July due to a rise in coronavirus infections in these countries. (Reuters, 08.07.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. With a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country.
    For third country nationals: Permanent (long-term) residents of the following countries are allowed to enter the Netherlands: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay. Entry explicitly concerns residents of countries, not nationals. E.g. an American resident in Australia is allowed to travel to Schengen. For more information, please see here: https://www.netherlandsandyou.nl/travel-and-residence/visas-for-the-netherlands/qas-travel-restrictions-for-the-netherlands and here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/news/2020/06/30/the-netherlands-lift-travel-ban-for-certain-groups-of-travellers.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The Dutch government has started to relax domestic coronavirus measures. The latest information on the Dutch government’s response to the coronavirus can be found here (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. From 1 June 2020 it became a requirement for passengers aged 13 and over to wear a non-medical face mask on trams, buses, water buses, metros and trains. Passengers who do not wear a face mask on public transport after 1 June can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but people must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Public transport should be used for essential travel only. Users should avoid rush hour and keep as far apart as possible. Cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will be allowed to re-open on June 1 with certain conditions. Reservations will be required and the government will impose a 30 person maximum occupancy limit, including staff. Effective July 1, campgrounds and vacation parks will re-open and the maximum occupancy limit for cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will rise to 100. Organized meetings up to 100 people will also be permitted. Gyms, saunas, casinos, and sports/dance schools may possibly be permitted to re-open on July 1 as well, pending a final review and announcement by the Dutch government at the end of June.

    *****Relaxation to restrictions:
    From 29 June, NS is running all its trains according to its usual, pre-coronavirus schedule again. The rail company called on travelers to adhere to measures in place to curb the spread of the coronavirus. (NL Times, 29.06.2020)

    Read more
    08.07.2020
  • Netherlands As of June 15, the Netherlands will begin accepting tourists from European countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands. (OSAC, 06.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    Tourists from EU or Schengen countries can enter the Netherlands. However, tourists from Sweden and the United Kingdom are strongly advised to go into quarantine for 14 days. Tourists must reserve their holiday accommodation before they travel to the Netherlands. You may be stopped at the border if you don’t have a valid reservation. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed.
    Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. With a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country.
    As from 1 July, EU Member States should start lifting the restrictions on non-essential travel into the EU for residents of the following third countries: Algeria, Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, Montenegro, Morocco, New Zealand, Rwanda, Serbia, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, China, subject to confirmation of reciprocity. Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican/Holy See should be considered as EU residents for this purpose. Every two weeks this list of countries will be reviewed and the information updated here. More info: [https://data.consiliurm.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-9208-2020-INIT/en/pdf].

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The Dutch government has started to relax domestic coronavirus measures. The latest information on the Dutch government’s response to the coronavirus can be found here (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. From 1 June 2020 it became a requirement for passengers aged 13 and over to wear a non-medical face mask on trams, buses, water buses, metros and trains. Passengers who do not wear a face mask on public transport after 1 June can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but people must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Public transport should be used for essential travel only. Users should avoid rush hour and keep as far apart as possible. Cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will be allowed to re-open on June 1 with certain conditions. Reservations will be required and the government will impose a 30 person maximum occupancy limit, including staff. Effective July 1, campgrounds and vacation parks will re-open and the maximum occupancy limit for cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will rise to 100. Organized meetings up to 100 people will also be permitted. Gyms, saunas, casinos, and sports/dance schools may possibly be permitted to re-open on July 1 as well, pending a final review and announcement by the Dutch government at the end of June.

    *****Relaxation to restrictions:
    From 29 June, NS is running all its trains according to its usual, pre-coronavirus schedule again. The rail company called on travelers to adhere to measures in place to curb the spread of the coronavirus. (NL Times, 29.06.2020)

    Read more
    07.07.2020
  • Netherlands As of June 15, the Netherlands will begin accepting tourists from European countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands. (OSAC, 06.06.2020)

    *****International Restrictions:
    From the Schengen Area: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can travel in and out of The Netherlands. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. Travellers from high-risk areas are strongly urged to go into quarantine for 14 days (e.g. Sweden and the United Kingdom). All passengers travelling to the Netherlands from an airport in a high risk area must complete a health declaration form. The form contains questions related to the presence of symptoms which could be related to COVID-19 virus. Before boarding a plane the crew checks the completed health declaration form. In case you have one of the symptoms as listed in the health declaration form, you’ll not be accepted on the flight to the Netherlands. This is also applicable for transit passengers. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) maintains a list of airports in areas with a high risk of contamination. Please verify with your airport of destination if additional requirements apply there. You can find measures at Schiphol (the largest Dutch airport) here: [https://www.schiphol.nl/en/page/coronavirus/]’
    Third Country Nationals: The Dutch government has adopted the decision of the EU to tighten the entry conditions of persons wishing to travel to the Netherlands from third countries, until 30 June 2020.
    Transit Passengers: Travellers from EU and Schengen countries can transit in the Netherlands. Dutch advice and rules to combat the spread of COVID-19 must be followed. With a travel ticket to a third country, it is possible to transit via Schiphol (main airport) directly to a third country.
    Quarantine: Travellers from the UK and Sweden are strongly advised to go into quarantaine for 14 days upon arrival in the Netherlands. This applies to travellers from high risk countries outside the EU/Schengen + UK as well. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) maintains a list of airports in areas with a high risk of contamination.
    Certification: All passengers travelling to the Netherlands from an airport in a high risk area must complete a health declaration form. The form contains questions related to the presence of symptoms which could be related to COVID-19 virus. Before boarding a plane the crew checks the completed health declaration form. In case you have one of the symptoms as listed in the health declaration form, you’ll not be accepted on the flight to the Netherlands. This is also applicable for transit passengers. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) maintains a list of airports in areas with a high risk of contamination. lease verify with your airport of destination if additional requirements apply there. You can find measures at Schiphol (the largest Dutch airport) here: https://www.schiphol.nl/en/page/coronavirus/

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The Dutch government has started to relax domestic coronavirus measures. The latest information on the Dutch government’s response to the coronavirus can be found here (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. From 1 June 2020 it became a requirement for passengers aged 13 and over to wear a non-medical face mask on trams, buses, water buses, metros and trains. Passengers who do not wear a face mask on public transport after 1 June can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but people must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Public transport should be used for essential travel only. Users should avoid rush hour and keep as far apart as possible. Cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will be allowed to re-open on June 1 with certain conditions. Reservations will be required and the government will impose a 30 person maximum occupancy limit, including staff. Effective July 1, campgrounds and vacation parks will re-open and the maximum occupancy limit for cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will rise to 100. Organized meetings up to 100 people will also be permitted. Gyms, saunas, casinos, and sports/dance schools may possibly be permitted to re-open on July 1 as well, pending a final review and announcement by the Dutch government at the end of June.

    *****Relaxation to restrictions:
    From 29 June, NS is running all its trains according to its usual, pre-coronavirus schedule again. The rail company called on travelers to adhere to measures in place to curb the spread of the coronavirus. (NL Times, 29.06.2020)

    Read more
    29.06.2020
  • Netherlands As of June 15, the Netherlands will begin accepting tourists from European countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands. (OSAC, 06.06.2020)

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands until 1 July.
    -This does not apply when arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    -This does not apply to British Nationals.
    -This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Monaco, Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City (Holy See) when they transit through Netherlands to return to their country of residence.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV).
    -This does not apply to passengers in transit.
    -This does not apply to :
    – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals;
    – healthcare personnel;
    – frontier workers;
    – transport of goods personnel;
    – diplomats;
    – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations,
    – military personnel;
    – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons;
    – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons.
    2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands.
    3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

    Commercial flight options are reduced. However, national carrier KLM airline has since 4 May increased the number of flights to destinations in Europe, including: Barcelona, Madrid, Roma, Milan, Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and Helsinki. Wearing of face masks is compulsory on all KLM flights. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face masks. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The Dutch government has started to relax domestic coronavirus measures. The latest information on the Dutch government’s response to the coronavirus can be found here (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. From 1 June 2020 it became a requirement for passengers aged 13 and over to wear a non-medical face mask on trams, buses, water buses, metros and trains. Passengers who do not wear a face mask on public transport after 1 June can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but people must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Public transport should be used for essential travel only. Users should avoid rush hour and keep as far apart as possible. Cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will be allowed to re-open on June 1 with certain conditions. Reservations will be required and the government will impose a 30 person maximum occupancy limit, including staff. Effective July 1, campgrounds and vacation parks will re-open and the maximum occupancy limit for cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will rise to 100. Organized meetings up to 100 people will also be permitted. Gyms, saunas, casinos, and sports/dance schools may possibly be permitted to re-open on July 1 as well, pending a final review and announcement by the Dutch government at the end of June.

    Read more
    20.06.2020
  • Netherlands As of June 15, the Netherlands will begin accepting tourists from European countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands. (OSAC, 06.06.2020)

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands until 15 June.
    -This does not apply when arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    -This does not apply to British Nationals.
    -This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Monaco, Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City (Holy See) when they transit through Netherlands to return to their country of residence.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV).
    -This does not apply to passengers in transit.
    -This does not apply to :
    – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals;
    – healthcare personnel;
    – frontier workers;
    – transport of goods personnel;
    – diplomats;
    – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations,
    – military personnel;
    – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons;
    – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons.
    2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands.
    3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

    Commercial flight options are reduced. However, national carrier KLM airline has since 4 May increased the number of flights to destinations in Europe, including: Barcelona, Madrid, Roma, Milan, Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and Helsinki. Wearing of face masks is compulsory on all KLM flights. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face masks. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    *****

    Internal restrictions:

    The Dutch government has started to relax domestic coronavirus measures. The latest information on the Dutch government’s response to the coronavirus can be found here (in English) [https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands]. From 1 June 2020 it became a requirement for passengers aged 13 and over to wear a non-medical face mask on trams, buses, water buses, metros and trains. Passengers who do not wear a face mask on public transport after 1 June can be fined €95. In stations, on platforms and at bus and tram stops face masks are not required, but people must stay 1.5 metres away from others. Public transport should be used for essential travel only. Users should avoid rush hour and keep as far apart as possible. Cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will be allowed to re-open on June 1 with certain conditions. Reservations will be required and the government will impose a 30 person maximum occupancy limit, including staff. Effective July 1, campgrounds and vacation parks will re-open and the maximum occupancy limit for cinemas, restaurants, cafes, and museums will rise to 100. Organized meetings up to 100 people will also be permitted. Gyms, saunas, casinos, and sports/dance schools may possibly be permitted to re-open on July 1 as well, pending a final review and announcement by the Dutch government at the end of June.

    Read more
    17.06.2020
  • Netherlands As of June 15, the Netherlands will begin accepting tourists from European countries where the health risks are similar to or lower than in the Netherlands. (OSAC, 06.06.2020)

    1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands until 15 June.
    -This does not apply when arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland.
    -This does not apply to British Nationals.
    -This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Monaco, Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City (Holy See) when they transit through Netherlands to return to their country of residence.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.
    -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV).
    -This does not apply to passengers in transit.
    -This does not apply to :
    – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals;
    – healthcare personnel;
    – frontier workers;
    – transport of goods personnel;
    – diplomats;
    – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations,
    – military personnel;
    – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons;
    – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons.
    2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands.
    3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

    Commercial flight options are reduced. However, national carrier KLM airline has since 4 May increased the number of flights to destinations in Europe, including: Barcelona, Madrid, Roma, Milan, Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and Helsinki. Wearing of face masks is compulsory on all KLM flights.
    Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face masks. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    National movement restrictions: free
    Restrictive measures recommended between 11 May 2020 to 31 December 2020.

    Still applies the rule to stay at home as much as possible. Go outside for work only when you cannot work at home. When outside keep the distance of 1,5m.
    Sport: Children up to 12 years old can exercise, exercise and follow activities together under supervision. Young people from 13 to 18 years old are allowed to exercise outside with each other under supervision, but with a distance of 1.5 meters between them. Outdoor sports in groups are allowed for all ages from May 11, if 1.5 meters can be kept apart. No competitions, no shared changing rooms or showers. From 1 June (organized and supervised by sports associations or professionals), young people aged 13 to 18 years old can exercise outside without 1.5 meters away. This relaxation already applied to children up to and including the age of 12. Sports competitions remain prohibited.
    Public transport: Only use public transport if you really need to, avoid rush hour and give each other space.
    As of May 11 a first cautious step is being taken to relax the visiting arrangement for nursing homes.
    From June 1st Public transport is only intended for necessary trips.
    In the tram, (water) bus, metro and train, it is compulsory for travelers aged 13 years and older to wear a non-medical mask. This does not apply to stations, stops and platforms; there a mask is not mandatory. Everyone here keeps 1.5 meters away from others.
    Travelers who do not wear a face mask after 1 June can be fined € 95.

    Non-essential shops closure: open
    Restrictive measures mandatory between 01 June 2020 to 30 June 2020.

    From June 1st, the following will apply:
    Restaurants and cafes are open, under conditions:
    a maximum of 30 guests (so excluding staff);
    visitors must make reservations;
    everyone keeps 1.5 meters away (except people from the same household);
    in a pre-check between entrepreneur and customer it is estimated whether a visit poses risks.
    There is no maximum number of people on terraces. Everyone should be seated at a table and kept 1.5 meters apart (except people from the same household).

    From June 1st film, theater and concert halls may open under conditions:
    a maximum of 30 people in the audience;
    visitors must book in advance;
    a preliminary interview to determine whether a visit poses risks;
    everyone keeps 1.5 meters apart.

    Museums and monuments are allowed to open if visitors buy tickets in advance and have a check-up conversation. The maximum number of visitors is dependent on the building. 1.5 meters must be kept away.
    Music schools and centers for the arts are open. There is a maximum number of 30 people per building, who must keep 1.5 meters away.
    Gyms remain closed.

    Forecast as of July 1
    If the virus remains under control, the communal toilets and showers at the campsites and holiday parks will reopen on 1 July. Also, the maximum number of visitors can hopefully be expanded to 100 people for cinemas, cultural institutions. This also applies to organized meetings, such as church services, weddings and funerals.

    Events stop: partially banned
    Restrictive measures mandatory between 01 June 2020 to 01 September 2020.

    From June 1st 30 people are allowed to meet in public buildings. People who work there don’t count.

    In principle, all events are prohibited until September 1.

    This includes professional football matches, but also cultural events such as festivals, pop concerts and other musical performances.
    Events are a specific category of gatherings. If the general ban on meetings would be relaxed in the future, it can be examined whether exemptions can be granted for certain performances. Cultural institutions will have to make a plan for this in which they apply the advice of RIVM on how this can be done safely.

    Other: closed/cancelled
    Restrictive measures mandatory between TBD to TBD.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are not permitted. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. All establishments serving food and drink will be closed until 1 June 2020.

    Relaxation in restrictions:
    According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain

    From 1 June restaurants, cafes and bars with outdoor seating can reopen with social distancing measures. Cinemas, cafes, bars and museums will also reopen subject to the following: a maximum of 30 people (including staff). For cinemas, the limit is 30 people per auditorium. In all cases people must be able to stay 1.5 metres apart; visitors must make a reservation or register beforehand; a check will take place first to assess possible health risks. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    05.06.2020
  • Netherlands 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands. -This does not apply when arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom. -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. -This does not apply to British Nationals. -This does not apply to nationals of Andorra, Monaco, Montenegro, North Macedonia (Rep.), San Marino, Serbia and Vatican City (Holy See) when they transit through Netherlands to return to their country of residence. -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV). -This does not apply to passengers in transit. -This does not apply to : – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals; – healthcare personnel; – frontier workers; – transport of goods personnel; – diplomats; – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations, – military personnel; – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons; – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons. 2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands. 3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Commercial flight options are reduced. However, national carrier KLM airline has since 4 May increased the number of flights to destinations in Europe, including: Barcelona, Madrid, Roma, Milan, Budapest, Prague, Warsaw and Helsinki. Wearing of face masks is compulsory on all KLM flights. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face masks. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are not permitted. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. All establishments serving food and drink will be closed until 1 June 2020. Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned. From 1 June restaurants, cafes and bars with outdoor seating can reopen with social distancing measures. Cinemas, cafes, bars and museums will also reopen subject to the following: a maximum of 30 people (including staff). For cinemas, the limit is 30 people per auditorium. In all cases people must be able to stay 1.5 metres apart; visitors must make a reservation or register beforehand; a check will take place first to assess possible health risks. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

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    30.05.2020
  • Netherlands 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands. -This does not apply when arriving from Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland (Rep.), Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland or United Kingdom. -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. -This does not apply to British Nationals. -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV). -This does not apply to passengers in transit. -This does not apply to : – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals; – healthcare personnel; – frontier workers; – transport of goods personnel; – diplomats; – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations, – military personnel; – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons; – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons. 2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands. 3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are not permitted. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. Gyms, cannabis cafes and sex clubs are closed. All special measures put in place have been extended until at least 19 May. Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned.

    From 1 June restaurants, cafes and bars with outdoor seating can reopen with social distancing measures. Cinemas, cafes, bars and museums will also reopen subject to the following: a maximum of 30 people (including staff). For cinemas, the limit is 30 people per auditorium. In all cases people must be able to stay 1.5 metres apart; visitors must make a reservation or register beforehand; a check will take place first to assess possible health risks. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    26.05.2020
  • Netherlands

    International restrictions:

    Foreign travellers who do not fall under the latest authorities exemptions are barred from entering the country until 15 June. Travellers heading to the Netherlands from a high risk Covid-19 transmission country need to fill in a health declaration certificate prior to boarding, which can be found on this website. The definitions of ‘high-risk countries’ can be found on this website . Passengers arriving from a high risk COVID-19 transmission country are required to self-quarantine for 14-days. Exceptions include: EU citizens (including nationals of the United Kingdom) and their family members; Nationals of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland and their family members; Third-country nationals who hold a residence card or residence permit in accordance with Directive 2003/109 / EC (the Long-Term Residents Directive); Third-country nationals who derive their right of residence from other European directives or from the national law of a Member State; Holders of a long-stay visa, including those with a temporary residence permit (MVV). Other persons with an essential function or need, including: Personnel working in Health Care; Border workers; Persons employed in the transportation of goods, where necessary; Diplomats; Military personnel; Personnel of international and humanitarian organizations; Persons who have compelling reasons to visit their families; Transit passengers who wish to travel via the Netherlands to another third country; Persons in need of international protection; the border procedure applies in full; Persons who are admitted for humanitarian reasons. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are not permitted. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. Gyms, cannabis cafes and sex clubs are closed. All special measures put in place have been extended until at least 19 May. Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned. From 1 June restaurants, cafes and bars with outdoor seating can reopen with social distancing measures. Cinemas, cafes, bars and museums will also reopen subject to the following: a maximum of 30 people (including staff). For cinemas, the limit is 30 people per auditorium. In all cases people must be able to stay 1.5 metres apart; visitors must make a reservation or register beforehand; a check will take place first to assess possible health risks. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    18.05.2020
  • Netherlands

    International restrictions:

    Flight restrictions for flights from Austria, China, Hong Kong, Iran, Italy, South Korea and Spain. Foreign travellers who do not fall under the latest authorities exemptions will be barred from entering the country until 15 May. Travellers heading to the Netherlands from a high risk Covid-19 transmission country need to fill in a health declaration certificate prior to boarding, which can be found on this website. The definitions of ‘high-risk countries’ can be found on this website. Passengers arriving from a high risk COVID-19 transmission country are required to self-quarantine for 14-days. Exceptions include: EU citizens (including nationals of the United Kingdom) and their family members; Nationals of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland and their family members; Third-country nationals who hold a residence card or residence permit in accordance with Directive 2003/109 / EC (the Long-Term Residents Directive); Third-country nationals who derive their right of residence from other European directives or from the national law of a Member State; Holders of a long-stay visa, including those with a temporary residence permit (MVV). Other persons with a vital function or need (Healthcare personnel, Frontier workers; Persons employed in the transport of goods, if necessary; Diplomats; Military personnel; Personnel of international and humanitarian organizations; Persons who have compelling reasons to visit their family; Transit passengers who want to travel to another third country via the Netherlands; Persons in need of international protection; the border procedure applies in full; Persons admitted for humanitarian reasons. Thalys services: all passengers are required to wear a face mask from 11 May. From 9 June, the rail operator will increase train frequency, notably for the route from Amsterdam, Dortmund and Paris.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are not permitted. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. Gyms, cannabis cafes and sex clubs are closed. All special measures put in place have been extended until at least 19 May.

    Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned. From 1 June restaurants, cafes and bars with outdoor seating can reopen with social distancing measures. Cinemas, cafes, bars and museums will also reopen subject to the following: a maximum of 30 people (including staff). For cinemas, the limit is 30 people per auditorium. In all cases people must be able to stay 1.5 metres apart; visitors must make a reservation or register beforehand; a check will take place first to assess possible health risks. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    16.05.2020
  • Netherlands Passengers arriving from a high risk COVID-19 transmission country are required to self-quarantine for 14-days.

    14.05.2020
  • Netherlands Government to begin phased easing of lockdown on 6 May (Reuters, 06.05.2020) 1. Passengers are not allowed to enter the Netherlands. -This does not apply to nationals of EEA Member States and Switzerland. -This does not apply to British Nationals. -This does not apply to passengers with a residence permit issued to long term residents of EEA Member States, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

    -This does not apply to passengers with a long-stay visa, including persons with a temporary residence permit (Machtiging Voor Voorlopig Verblijf – MVV).-This does not apply to passengers in transit. -This does not apply to: – family members of nationals of Switzerland, EEA Member States and of British nationals; – healthcare personnel; – frontier workers; – transport of goods personnel; – diplomats; – personnel of international and humanitarian organizations, – military personnel; – passengers traveling for emergency family reasons; – passengers in need of international protection or for other humanitarian reasons. 2. A completed ‘Health Declaration Form’ for passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries must be presented prior to boarding any aircraft with destination the Netherlands. 3. Passengers departing from high risk Coronavirus (COVID-19) countries are instructed to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

    International restrictions:

    Flight restrictions for flights from Austria, China, Hong Kong, Iran, Italy, South Korea and Spain. Foreign travellers who do not fall under the latest authorities exemptions will be barred from entering the country until 15 May. Travellers heading to the Netherlands from a high risk Covid-19 transmission country need to fill in a health declaration certificate prior to boarding. Passengers arriving from a high risk COVID-19 transmission country are required to self-quarantine for 14-days. Exceptions include: EU citizens (including nationals of the United Kingdom) and their family members; Nationals of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland and their family members; Third-country nationals who hold a residence card or residence permit in accordance with Directive 2003/109 / EC (the Long-Term Residents Directive); Third-country nationals who derive their right of residence from other European directives or from the national law of a Member State; Holders of a long-stay visa, including those with a temporary residence permit (MVV). Other persons with a vital function or need (Healthcare personnel, Frontier workers; Persons employed in the transport of goods, if necessary; Diplomats; Military personnel; Personnel of international and humanitarian organizations;

    Persons who have compelling reasons to visit their family; Transit passengers who want to travel to another third country via the Netherlands; Persons in need of international protection; the border procedure applies in full; Persons admitted for humanitarian reasons.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are to be cancelled. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September. No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport. All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June. Gyms, cannabis cafes and sex clubs are closed. Restaurants and bars will remain closed until at least 20 May.

    All special measures put in place have been extended until 28 April at least. Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned. Children up to 12 years old may resume playing sports in teams, as long as it is not against each other. Same for children 12-18 years old who can exercise sports in teams but keeping 1.5 metres distance. Secondary schools are to reopen from 1 June. Further details wil be made available closer to these dates.

    Public transport will also resume its services to a normal timetable – although only 40% of its seats will be available, provided individuals wear a face mask. A maximum of ten people can sit together outside bars. Restaurants, theatres and cinemas will open their doors for a maximum of 30 people. Libraries will also reopen. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as restaurants, cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    14.05.2020
  • Netherlands Government to begin phased easing of lockdown on 6 May (Reuters, 06.05.2020=

    International restrictions:

    Flight restrictions for flights from Austria, China, Hong Kong, Iran, Italy, South Korea and Spain.
    Foreign travellers who do not fall under the latest authorities exemptions will be barred from entering the country until 15 May.
    Travellers heading to the Netherlands from a high risk Covid-19 transmision country need to fill in a health declaration certificate prior to boarding.

    Exceptions include:
    EU citizens (including nationals of the United Kingdom) and their family members;
    Nationals of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland and their family members;
    Third-country nationals who hold a residence card or residence permit in accordance with Directive 2003/109 / EC (the Long-Term Residents Directive);
    Third-country nationals who derive their right of residence from other European directives or from the national law of a Member State;
    Holders of a long-stay visa, including those with a temporary residence permit (MVV).
    Other persons with a vital function or need (Healthcare personnel, Frontier workers; Persons employed in the transport of goods, if necessary; Diplomats; Military personnel; Personnel of international and humanitarian organizations; Persons who have compelling reasons to visit their family; Transit passengers who want to travel to another third country via the Netherlands; Persons in need of international protection; the border procedure applies in full; Persons admitted for humanitarian reasons.

    Internal restrictions:

    Gatherings of more than 100 are to be cancelled. This includes the closure of public places such as museums, concert venues, theatres, sports clubs and the cancellation of sports matches and other events. Such events will be banned until the start of September.
    No gatherings of more than two people are permitted and a distance of at least 1.5 metres must be maintained, notably in shops and public transport.
    All events and public gatherings are banned until 1 June.
    Gyms, cannabis cafes and sex clubs are closed. Restaurants and bars will remain closed until at least 20 May.
    All special measures put in place have been extended until 28 April at least.

    Relaxation in restrictions: According to the authorities, measures will gradually start be lifted as below: Primary schools are to start reopening from 11 May. Likewise for small shops such as hairdressers (with appointments). Non-contact outdoor sports, such as tennis and golf, can be practiced again, however competitions remain banned. Children up to 12 years old may resume playing sports in teams, as long as it is not against each other. Same for children 12-18 years old who can exercise sports in teams but keeping 1.5 metres distance. Secondary schools are to reopen from 1 June. Further details wil be made available closer to these dates. Public transport will also resume its services to a normal timetable – although only 40% of its seats will be available, provided individuals wear a face mask. A maximum of ten people can sit together outside bars. Restaurants, theatres and cinemas will open their doors for a maximum of 30 people. Libraries will also reopen. From 1 July, campsites and holiday parks will be allowed to reopen as well as restaurants, cinemas and theatres up to a maximum of 100 people. From 1 September, all sports, including contact sports and competitions will be allowed again. Saunas, casinos, cafeterias and coffee shops can open.

    Read more
    09.05.2020
  • Source OSAC Travel Advisories/
    Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Re-open Europe/
    Dutch Government/
    #Europe, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #, #