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Republic of Ireland travel restrictions

Open for citizens: yes Open for foreigners: partial Open for tourism: partial Quarantine: partial
Airlines Updates
Published on 13.01.2022, Ryanair, Lufthansa:

Ryanair and Lufthansa clash over EU's airport slot rules

Published on 12.01.2022, Ryanair:

Ryanair solves Lufthansa’s “Ghost Flight” problem – Just sell the seats to consumers at low fares!!!

Published on 11.01.2022, Ryanair:

Ryanair given the all-clear for court case against online travel giant Booking.com and “screen-scraping” of fares

Published on 10.01.2022, Ryanair:

Ryanair cancels additional flights because of COVID-19

Published on 07.01.2022, Ryanair:

Ryanair to suspend all its flights from, to Frankfurt from 31 March because of high airport fees

Published on 06.01.2022, Ryanair:

Ryanair cancels more flights because of COVID-19

Published on 30.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair will considerably reduce its services out of Danish airports during much of January 2022

Published on 30.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair cancels several Spanish routes in January 2022 because of COVID-19

Published on 30.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair cancels a third of flights due to Omicron variant.

Published on 23.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair cuts capacity by a third in JAN22

Published on 23.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair more than doubles annual loss forecast over Omicron

Published on 20.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair CEO O’Leary suggests to ban anti-vaxxers from flying.

Published on 07.12.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus to resume Dublin-Philadelphia service, increase Dublin-Washington Dulles frequency.

Published on 03.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair cancels all flights to Morocco until February 2022 because of 'lack of clarity' from Moroccan government

Published on 01.12.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair seeks authorization for Morocco repatriation flights.

Published on 30.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair to take delivery of 65 Boeing 737 MAX in 2022

Published on 30.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair CEO says Omicron no reason to cancel flights.

Published on 24.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair boss says fears of new European lockdowns are deterring bookings.

Published on 24.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair boss says reform of ATC would cut carbon emissions from aviation

Published on 23.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair's Michael O'Leary attacks rival airlines over carbon emissions.

Published on 15.11.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus increases flights to the United States.

Published on 15.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair launches digital updates to improve customer experience.

Published on 05.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair is starting 250 routes in the space of 31 days.

Published on 04.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair’s top 737 MAX airports in November.

Published on 02.11.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair to cut winter fares to boost demand.

Published on 29.10.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus to fly to 62 destinations from next summer- 13 destinations to North America.

Published on 29.10.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair vows 5-day refund turnaround after COVID criticism.

Published on 29.10.2021, Ryanair:

197 seats and consistent experience: flying Ryanair’s «Gamechanger» 737 MAX 8200.

Published on 25.10.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus arrived in Barbados and awaits the start of new routes to the US.

Published on 21.10.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus: flights from Manchester to Barbados takes off.

Published on 19.10.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus to resume Dublin-San Francisco service.

Published on 15.10.2021, Ryanair :

Ryanair returns to UK domestic market.

Published on 15.10.2021, Ryanair :

Ryanair launches new routes

Published on 05.10.2021, Ryanair, Wizz Air:

Ryanair and Wizz Air double September carryings.

Published on 04.10.2021, Ryanair:

Ryanair passenger numbers continue their recovery.

Published on 30.09.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus confirms plans to commence Manchester services to Barbados on 20OCT21; New York JFK 01DEC21; Orlando 11DEC21.

Published on 28.09.2021, Ryanair :

Where Are Ryanair’s Boeing 737 MAX 200s Flying In October?

Published on 28.09.2021, Ryanair :

Ryanair plans to restore routes and reopen base in Cork by end of year.

Published on 21.09.2021, Ryanair :

Ryanair to connect Jordan to Madrid.

Published on 21.09.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus Resumed Its Service Between Dublin And Toronto on 17SEP21.

Published on 14.09.2021, Ryanair :

Ryanair Ends 737 MAX Talks

Published on 14.09.2021, Aer Lingus:

Aer Lingus Shannon-London Heathrow service returned on 13SEP21

Full Restrictions
Open for travel from Republic of Ireland
Flight Restrictions
Published on 22.12.2021

1. Passengers must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at https://travel.eplf.gov.ie/en at most 72 hours before arrival. - This does not apply to passengers younger than 18 years.

2. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) with a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative a COVID-19 antigen test taken at most
48 hours before arrival; or - a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not
apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

3. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) without a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most
72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

4. Residence permits issued by Ireland (Rep.) which have expired on or after 20 March 2020 are considered valid until 15 January 2022.

Published on 21.12.2021

1. Until 21 December 2021, visa exemption to nationals of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho and South Africa are suspended.

2. Passengers must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at https://travel.eplf.gov.ie/en at most 72 hours before arrival. - This does not apply to passengers younger than 18 years.

3. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) with a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative a COVID-19 antigen test taken at most
48 hours before arrival; or - a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not
apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

4. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) without a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most
72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

5. Residence permits issued by Ireland (Rep.) which have expired on or after 20 March 2020 are considered valid until 15 January 2022.

Published on 20.12.2021

1. Visa exemption to nationals of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho and South Africa has been suspended.

2. Passengers must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at https://travel.eplf.gov.ie/en at most 72 hours before arrival. - This does not apply to passengers younger than 18 years.

3. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) with a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative a COVID-19 antigen test taken at most
48 hours before arrival; or - a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not
apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

4. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) without a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most
72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

5. Residence permits issued by Ireland (Rep.) which have expired on or after 20 March 2020 are considered valid until 31 May 2022.

Published on 03.12.2021

1. Visa exemption to nationals of Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho and South Africa has been suspended.

2. Passengers must complete a "Passenger Locator Form" at https://travel.eplf.gov.ie/en at most 72 hours before arrival. - This does not apply to passengers younger than 18 years.

3. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) with a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative a COVID-19 antigen test taken at most
48 hours before arrival; or - a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most 72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not
apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

4. Passengers entering or transiting through Ireland (Rep.) without a COVID-19 digital vaccination or recovery certificate must have a negative COVID-19 RT-PCR test taken at most
72 hours before arrival. More information can be found at https://tinyurl.com/bzk624mh - This does not apply to passengers who are 11 years or younger.

5. Residence permits issued by Ireland (Rep.) which have expired on or after 20 March 2020 are considered valid until 15 January 2022.

Quarantine

Quarantine requirement at government designated site- subject to category.
A passenger arriving into Ireland without the required negative pre-departure test result has already committed an offense and in the interests of public health shall also be required to home quarantine and take a RT-PCR test within 36 hours following arrival. If no RT-PCR test is taken the passenger must remain in home quarantine for 10 days after arrival.
Since 22 December 2021, the enhanced restrictions of 7 high-risk scheduled states (Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe) are lifted. Travellers arriving from all overseas countries will be subject to the same restrictions upon arrival to Ireland.

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Cheap flights
Insurance
Certification

COVID-19 negative certification subject to special conditions.
Document checklist
1. Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
2. Proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-10. Details in the sections below.
3. For those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arriving in Ireland. Self-administered tests are not accepted.
For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland willl be accepted.
*Pre-departure Test: From midnight on Thursday 6 January 2022 travellers who are not fully vaccinated or have a proof of recovering certificate and are travelling to Ireland, have to show a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in the country. This includes travellers from Great Britain, but not those whose journey originates in Northern Ireland (see specific guidance for these travellers below).
*Post-Arrival Tests: The Irish Government advises all travellers to undertake daily antigen tests for 5 consecutive days, beginning with the day of arrival. Further information on what to do if you develop symptoms or have a positive antigen test can be found on the HSE website.
Ireland will no longer require vaccinated arrivals to present negative COVID-19 test. Unvaccinated travellers will still be required to show a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival (Reuters, 05.01.2022).
*Passengers arriving from all overseas countries are advised to undertake daily antigen tests for 5 consecutive days, beginning with the day of arrival (and to self-isolate immediately and seek a PCR test if they develop symptoms or have a positive antigen test). Travellers whose journey originated in Northern Ireland and have not been overseas in the past 14-days are not obliged to complete a Passenger Locator Form or provide proof of vaccination, recovery or test results upon arrival into Ireland.

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Vaccination

THIS COUNTRY IS READY TO CONNECT TO THE EU DIGITAL COVID CERTIFICATE GATEWAY

Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

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Full Restrictions

  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:Authorities in Ireland obliges travelers from U.K. to take COVID-19 test for five days upon arrival (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Documents equivalent to the ‘EU Digital COVID Certificate’ are also accepted, if they meet the same requirements listed above for the EUDCC.

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

     

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    The regulations concerning entry into Ireland also apply to people who solely change flights at an Irish airport. This means that people who changes planes need to furnish proof of vaccination, recovery or testing.

    *From Third Countries:

    Mandatory travel documents

    1. Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    2. Proof of vaccination. Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac (Sinovac), and Sinopharm BBP.

    3. Proof of recovery from COVID-19 in the past six months.

    4. Travellers without proof of vaccination or recovery in the past six months must show evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arriving in Ireland.

    5. For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland willl be accepted. 

    The travel carrier will check the relevant test result upon departure. You may be asked to present it again on arrival. Please retain all results for 14 days after arrival.

     

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    11.01.2022
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:Authorities in Ireland obliges travelers from U.K. to take COVID-19 test for five days upon arrival (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    • In addition to the certificate, travellers must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.
    • Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.
    • For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland will be accepted. They must also show a negative antigen test together with their positive PCR test on arrival.
    • The travel carrier will check your relevant test result at boarding. You may be asked to present it when you arrive. Retain all tests results and documentation for 14 days after arrival.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

     

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers, regardless of their vaccine or recovery status, must take a PCR test or antigen test before they arrive in Ireland:

    • For those with proof of vaccination or recovery, please also provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • For those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • Self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    • In addition to the certificate, travellers must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.
    • Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.
    • For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland will be accepted. They must also show a negative antigen test together with their positive PCR test on arrival.
    • The travel carrier will check your relevant test result at boarding. You may be asked to present it when you arrive. Retain all tests results and documentation for 14 days after arrival.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    23.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:Authorities in Ireland obliges travelers from U.K. to take COVID-19 test for five days upon arrival (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    • In addition to the certificate, travellers must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.
    • Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.
    • For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland will be accepted. They must also show a negative antigen test together with their positive PCR test on arrival.
    • The travel carrier will check your relevant test result at boarding. You may be asked to present it when you arrive. Retain all tests results and documentation for 14 days after arrival.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

     

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers, regardless of their vaccine or recovery status, must take a PCR test or antigen test before they arrive in Ireland:

    • for those with proof of vaccination or recovery, please also provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • for those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    • In addition to the certificate, travellers must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.
    • Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.
    • For persons who continually test positive after recovery, a positive PCR test result from a test taken no less than 11 days and no more than 180 days prior to the date of arrival in Ireland will be accepted. They must also show a negative antigen test together with their positive PCR test on arrival.
    • The travel carrier will check your relevant test result at boarding. You may be asked to present it when you arrive. Retain all tests results and documentation for 14 days after arrival.

    Since 30 November, Ireland has banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    20.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:Authorities in Ireland obliges travelers from U.K. to take COVID-19 test for five days upon arrival (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers without a certificate must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.

    Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers, regardless of their vaccine or recovery status, must take a PCR test or antigen test before they arrive in Ireland:

    • for those with proof of vaccination or recovery, please also provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • for those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers must provide the results of either a PCR test or antigen test taken before they arrive in Ireland:

    • travellers with a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • travellers without a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests are not acccepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    15.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:Authorities in Ireland obliges travelers from U.K. to take COVID-19 test for five days upon arrival (SVI, 11.12.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers without a certificate must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.

    Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers, regardless of their vaccine or recovery status, must take a PCR test or antigen test before they arrive in Ireland:

    • for those with proof of vaccination or recovery, please also provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • for those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers must provide the results of either a PCR test or antigen test taken before they arrive in Ireland:

    • travellers with a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • travellers without a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests are not acccepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    13.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Belfast International Airport issues travel advice, requires COVID-19 tests; current ‘red list’ countries for Northern Ireland from Africa reported (Belfast Live, 12.6.2021). Ireland to require COVID-19 tests for all arrivals (Reuters, 30.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers without a certificate must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Self-administered tests are not accepted.

    Approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers, regardless of their vaccine or recovery status, must take a PCR test or antigen test before they arrive in Ireland:

    • for those with proof of vaccination or recovery, please also provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • for those without proof of vaccination or recovery, please provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers must complete a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    All travellers must provide the results of either a PCR test or antigen test taken before they arrive in Ireland:

    • travellers with a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of either (a) a negative antigen test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival or (b) a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • travellers without a certificate of vaccination or recovery must provide the results of a negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival.
    • self-administered tests are not acccepted.
    • approved vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP.

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    09.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Starting from Sunday, December 5, all travellers reaching the territory of Ireland are obliged to show proof of negative test results of a Coronavirus test.

    The decision was signed by the Irish Minister for Health, Stephen Donnelly, on December 3, in a bid of the government to curb the spread of the COVID-19, in particular amid the spread of the new virus variant, Omicron.

    Explaining entry rules applicable from Sunday and on, the Ministry of Health notes in a press release that a test upon arrival is obligatory for all too. While travellers who hold proof of vaccination or recovery from the virus can present proof of either PCR negative test results taken within 72 hours upon arrival or a negative result taken of an antigen test taken within 48 hours of arrival, the conditions are a bit tighter for those unvaccinated and unrecovered.

    “Passengers without proof of vaccination or recovery must show a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival,” which means that antigen tests are not accepted for these travellers.

    Moreover, vaccinated and recovered travellers who present negative results of a Rapid Antigen Test are permitted to enter the country only if the test is listed in the common EU rapid antigen test list and is carried out by a health professional or skilled testing personnel.

    The Ministry reminds all travellers that their test results will be checked pre-departure, and those who fail to present them will have to quarantine upon reaching Ireland.

    “Passengers to Ireland who arrive without a negative test result are required to home quarantine and take a PCR test within 36 hours of arrival. A subsequent negative / not detected text can enable the passenger to exit the home quarantine. If no PCR test is taken, the passenger must remain in home quarantine for ten days after arrival,” the Ministry explains.

    Read more
    06.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Ireland to require COVID-19 tests for all arrivals (Reuters, 30.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Travellers to Ireland must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • from 5 December, anyone travelling to Ireland has to show a negative COVID test.
    • If you do not have a Digital COVID Certificate based on vaccination and recovery, you have to show a negative (‘not detected’) RT-PCR test which was carried out no more than 72 hours before you arrive in Ireland.
    • Self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    Travel alert

    Travellers to Ireland––vaccinated or not––must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • from 5 December, anyone travelling to Ireland has to show a negative COVID test.
    • If you do not have a Digital COVID Certificate based on vaccination and recovery, you have to show a negative (‘not detected’) RT-PCR test which was carried out no more than 72 hours before you arrive in Ireland.
    • If you have a proof of vaccination and recovery from COVID-19, you have to show a negative (‘not detected’) antigen test which was carried out no more than 48 hours before you arrive in Ireland. Alternatively, you can show a negative (‘not detected’) RT-PCR test which was carried out no more than 72 hours before you arrive.
    • Self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result taken 72 hours before arrival. Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to tests during their period of self-isolation.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

     

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel alert

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation. 

    Mandatory travel documentation

    All travellers to Ireland must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • from 5 December, anyone travelling to Ireland has to show a negative COVID test.
    • If you do not have a Digital COVID Certificate based on vaccination and recovery, you have to show a negative (‘not detected’) RT-PCR test which was carried out no more than 72 hours before you arrive in Ireland.
    • If you have a proof of vaccination and recovery from COVID-19, you have to show a negative (‘not detected’) antigen test which was carried out no more than 48 hours before you arrive in Ireland. Alternatively, you can show a negative (‘not detected’) RT-PCR test which was carried out no more than 72 hours before you arrive.
    • Self-administered tests will not be accepted.
    • Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    03.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Ireland to require COVID-19 tests for all arrivals (Reuters, 30.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers to Ireland––vaccinated or not––must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • provide proof of a clear COVID test. Accepted tests: antigen (48 hours) and PCR (72 hours). Self-administered tests will not be accepted.

    Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel alert

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from eight countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation. 

    Mandatory travel documentation

    All travellers to Ireland––vaccinated or not––must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • provide proof of a clear COVID test. Accepted tests: antigen (48 hours) and PCR (72 hours). Self-administered tests will not be accepted.

    Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    02.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Ireland to require COVID-19 tests for all arrivals (Reuters, 30.11.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers to Ireland––vaccinated or not––must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • provide proof of a clear COVID test. Accepted tests: antigen (48 hours) and PCR (72 hours). Self-administered tests will not be accepted.

    Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Travel alert

    From 30 November, Ireland banned entry from eight countries in southern Africa where a new coronavirus variant is in circulation: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, Eswatini, Malawi and Lesotho. Only Irish citizens, approved residents and certain others can enter from these countries. They must provide evidence of a negative PCR test result (72 hours). Even vaccinated persons must complete a two-week quarantine on arrival and submit to further tests during their period of self-isolation. 

    Mandatory travel documentation

    All travellers to Ireland––vaccinated or not––must:

    • fill a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.
    • provide proof of a clear COVID test. Accepted tests: antigen (48 hours) and PCR (72 hours). Self-administered tests will not be accepted.

    Vaccines accepted in Ireland: Pfizer-BioNtech, Modernia, Oxford-AstraZenica, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac, (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BBP. More details about accepted vaccines and their doses can be found here.

    Learn more:

    Government of Ireland

    Citizens Information

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    01.12.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers entering this country must fill in a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers from EU and EEA member states can enter this country if their EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) contains one of the following:

    • Proof of full vaccination. Accepted vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BIBP.
    • Proof of recovery from COVID-19. Valid between 11 and 180 days from PCR test.
    • Negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival or a positive PCR test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Travellers who cannot present any evidence of immunity or a recent PCR test result may be denied boarding. If they arrive in Ireland without proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or a valid PCR test result, they will be required to take a test within 36 hours of arrival.

    Learn more:

    www.gov.ie

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers entering this country must fill in a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers from EU and EEA member states can enter this country if their EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) contains one of the following:

    • Proof of full vaccination. Accepted vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BIBP.
    • Proof of recovery from COVID-19. Valid between 11 and 180 days from PCR test.
    • Negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival or a positive PCR test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Travellers who cannot present any evidence of immunity or a recent PCR test result may be denied boarding. If they arrive in Ireland without proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or a valid PCR test result, they will be required to take a test within 36 hours of arrival.

    Learn more:

    www.gov.ie

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    23.11.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers entering this country must fill in a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers from EU and EEA member states can enter this country if their EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) contains one of the following:

    • Proof of full vaccination. Accepted vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BIBP.
    • Proof of recovery from COVID-19. Valid between 11 and 180 days from PCR test.
    • Negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival or a positive PCR test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Travellers who cannot present any evidence of immunity or a recent PCR test result may be denied boarding. If they arrive in Ireland without proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or a valid PCR test result, they will be required to take a test within 36 hours of arrival.

    Learn more:

    www.gov.ie

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    All travellers entering this country must fill in a Passenger Locator Form. This is a pre-boarding requirement.

    Travellers from EU and EEA member states can enter this country if their EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) contains one of the following:

    • Proof of full vaccination. Accepted vaccines: Pfizer-BioNtech, Moderna, Oxford-AstraZeneca, Johnson & Johnson/Janssen, Coronavac (Sinovac) and Sinopharm BIBP.
    • Proof of recovery from COVID-19. Valid between 11 and 180 days from PCR test.
    • Negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival or a positive PCR test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Travellers who cannot present any evidence of immunity or a recent PCR test result may be denied boarding. If they arrive in Ireland without proof of vaccination, proof of recovery or a valid PCR test result, they will be required to take a test within 36 hours of arrival.

    Learn more:

    www.gov.ie

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    17.11.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from the EU/EFTA, (and who have not been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the previous 14 days), with acceptable proof of vaccination, recovery or negative/not detected RT-PCR test do not have to undergo quarantine or travel-related testing.

    A passenger who has been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the 14 days prior to the arrival into Ireland is subject to the rules applying to that country (see section ‘What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?’).

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received.

    All passengers are advised to observe public health restrictions and to present for post-arrival testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Please check the glossary listing the requirements for valid certificates at the bottom of the page.

    A relevant Digital COVID Certificate or alternative valid proof of vaccination, recovery or RT-PCR test result can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

    —————–

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    15.11.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from the EU/EFTA, (and who have not been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the previous 14 days), with acceptable proof of vaccination, recovery or negative/not detected RT-PCR test do not have to undergo quarantine or travel-related testing.

    A passenger who has been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the 14 days prior to the arrival into Ireland is subject to the rules applying to that country (see section ‘What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?’).

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received.

    All passengers are advised to observe public health restrictions and to present for post-arrival testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Please check the glossary listing the requirements for valid certificates at the bottom of the page.

    A relevant Digital COVID Certificate or alternative valid proof of vaccination, recovery or RT-PCR test result can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

    —————–

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    10.11.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Travellers from other countries wishing to enter Ireland will no longer be obliged to follow mandatory hotel quarantine requirements, as such a measure has been lifted by the Irish government.

    According to the country’s Minister of Health, Stephen Donnelly, the quarantine requirement has been reduced progressively in the recent months, SchengenVisaInfo.com reports.

    “The mandatory hotel quarantine system was introduced as an exceptional public health measure at a time that our country was contending with the very serious risk of importation of variants of concern that had the potential to overwhelm our health service and, in particular, to undermine Ireland’s Covid-19 vaccination programme,” Donnelly pointed out in this regard, as reported by BTN Europe.

    He stressed that the most significant number of persons in mandatory hotel quarantines reached the highest number on 9, 2021, with 1,008 people accommodated in such designed places.

    “The successful operation of mandatory hotel quarantine has played a central role in protecting the population, maintaining control of the disease, and enabling the safe relaxation of restrictions on our economy and society,” Donnelly pointed out in this regard.

    The Irish Minister of Health also stressed that during the time that such a scheme was applied, a total of 10,294 people followed quarantine rules, while 593 of them subsequently tested positive for the COVID-19.

    Read more
    28.09.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from the EU/EFTA, (and who have not been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the previous 14 days), with acceptable proof of vaccination, recovery or negative/not detected RT-PCR test do not have to undergo quarantine or travel-related testing.

    A passenger who has been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the 14 days prior to the arrival into Ireland is subject to the rules applying to that country (see section ‘What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?’).

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received.

    All passengers are advised to observe public health restrictions and to present for post-arrival testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Please check the glossary listing the requirements for valid certificates at the bottom of the page.

    A relevant Digital COVID Certificate or alternative valid proof of vaccination, recovery or RT-PCR test result can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

    —————–

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: On 31 August the Irish Government announced that pandemic-related restrictions would be eased over the course of September, with most remaining restrictions due to be lifted on 22 October, subject to the course of the pandemic. Various restrictions will be lifted on 1 September, 6 September, and 20 September, and many more on 22 October. For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website . This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafés & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.
    *If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

    Read more
    02.09.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from the EU/EFTA, (and who have not been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the previous 14 days), with acceptable proof of vaccination, recovery or negative/not detected RT-PCR test do not have to undergo quarantine or travel-related testing.

    A passenger who has been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the 14 days prior to the arrival into Ireland is subject to the rules applying to that country (see section ‘What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?’).

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received.

    All passengers are advised to observe public health restrictions and to present for post-arrival testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Please check the glossary listing the requirements for valid certificates at the bottom of the page.

    A relevant Digital COVID Certificate or alternative valid proof of vaccination, recovery or RT-PCR test result can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

    —————–

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    05.08.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from the EU/EFTA, (and who have not been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the previous 14 days), with acceptable proof of vaccination, recovery or negative/not detected RT-PCR test do not have to undergo quarantine or travel-related testing.

    A passenger who has been in a non-EU/EFTA country in the 14 days prior to the arrival into Ireland is subject to the rules applying to that country (see section ‘What are the rules to enter this country from outside an EU Member State or Schengen Associated country?’).

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received.

    All passengers are advised to observe public health restrictions and to present for post-arrival testing if they develop symptoms of COVID-19.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Please check the glossary listing the requirements for valid certificates at the bottom of the page.

    A relevant Digital COVID Certificate or alternative valid proof of vaccination, recovery or RT-PCR test result can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

    —————–

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    POST ARRIVAL

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    —————–

    GLOSSARY

    Proof of vaccination:

    A non-DCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-DCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    02.08.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    PRE-DEPARTURE

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 must present evidence of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR result taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. A non RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland or boarding a connecting flight/ferry should indicate this on the COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates or has transited through a country which is NOT a Designated State

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    Pre-departure

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    Passengers must have:

    • valid proof of vaccination;
    • valid proof of recovery from COVID-19, valid between 11 and 180 days from the date of a positive PCR test; or
    • a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test, taken within 72 hours of arrival in Ireland. A non-RT-PCR test (for example, antigen) is not accepted.

    At the bottom of this section there are the requirements for valid certificates.

    These certificates can be shown on arrival to Ireland.

    Passenger travelling with a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Post-arrival

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and proof of vaccination, recovery or negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger.

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.
    • If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • present evidence of a negative PCR test result taken within 72 hours prior to arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the Health Service Executive (HSE).

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered responsible adults, with the same address, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult with the same address needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Those travelling without valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result is received, and self-quarantine thereafter as above.

     

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in or has transited through a country which is a Designated State

    Pre-departure

    All passengers (with limited exemptions) travelling to Ireland must fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure. This is a pre-boarding requirement when travelling to Ireland.

    All passengers, including those who are vaccinated or recovered, must have valid proof of a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of the test result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country they are travelling from.

    Passengers will be asked to show evidence of mandatory hotel booking where applicable.

    Post-arrival

    After arrival in Ireland, immigration officers will be conducting checks on the Passenger Locator Form and negative RT-PCR test result carried by the passenger, and proof of vaccination, recovery (where relevant).

    • If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival at address given on Passenger Locator Form;
      • may undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.
    • If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:
      • show evidence of a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
      • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this must be pre-booked in advance of travel;
      • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country.

    Those travelling with no valid documentation or acceptable proofs must enter mandatory hotel quarantine until a negative/not-detected RT-PCR test result taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland which permits the passenger to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

     

    PROOF OF VACCINATION, RECOVERY OR TESTS ACCEPTED IN ADDITION TO EUDCCProof of vaccination:

    A non-EUDCC proof of vaccination means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

    For the purposes of travel, passengers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

    Recovery certificates:

    A non-EUDCC ‘proof of recovery’ means a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, dates the certificate is valid from and valid until (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

    A relevant test result:

    A negative RT-PCR test result taken within 72 hours of arrival to Ireland or a positive RT-PCR Covid test result at least 11 days prior to arrival (and no more than 180 days). Antigen test results are not accepted.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    01.08.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC or a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 will need to must:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • present evidence of a negative RT-PCR result from a test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    If travellers do not have a valid proof of vaccination/recovery and you do not have a negative or not detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours you must quarantine in a hotel.

    Also children between the ages of 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country if they don’t have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    To protect its citizens against the importation of variants, an ‘emergency brake’ mechanism is coordinated at EU level to react swiftly to the emergence of a variant of concern or variant of interest. The Government advice is to avoid travel to a country where the emergency brake has been applied.

     

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates in a country to which the EU has not applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.

    If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, he/she need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • present evidence of a negative PCR test result within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

     

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in a country to which the EU has applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    List of designated countries

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, he/she need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • have a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, he/she need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • produce evidence of a negative result from a PCR test undertaken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this his must be pre-booked and prepaied in advance of travel;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland, you will be able to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children aged between 12 and 17 will be required to have a negative RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival to travel into the country, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery.

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered adults, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine, unless they have valid proof of vaccination or recovery themselves.

    Travellers will be asked to show evidence of the negative or ‘not detected’ result to a COVID-19 test before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    People who do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine are committing an offence and can be fined up to € 2 500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    GLOSSARY

    When is a person fully vaccinated?

    For the purposes of travel, a person is considered fully vaccinated if he/she has been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency after the following recommended number of days from the final dose:

    • 7 days from the second dose of Pfizer-BioNtech Vaccine: BNT162b2 (Comirnaty®);
    • 14 days from the second dose of Moderna Vaccine: CX-024414 (Moderna®);
    • 15 days from the second dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca Vaccine: ChAdOx1-SARS-COV-2 (Vaxzevria® or Covishield);
    • 14 days from the single dose of Johnson & Johnson/Janssen Vaccine: Ad26.COV2-S [recombinant] (Janssen®).

     

    What is proof of vaccination?

    It’s a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • confirmation that the person to whom the record or evidence refers is a vaccinated person;
    • the date or dates on which the person was vaccinated;
    • the body in the state concerned implementing the vaccination programme (howsoever described) on behalf of the state that administered or caused to be administered the vaccination to the person concerned.

     

    What is a recovery certificate?

    It’s a record or evidence in written or electronic form in English or Irish or an official translation into Irish or English which contains the following information:

    • name, date of birth, disease from which holder has recovered, date of holder’s first positive NAAT test result, Member State or third country in which test was carried out, certificate issuer, validity dates of the certificate (not more than 180 days after the date of first positive NAAT test result).

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    29.07.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC must:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • if you do not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, you will need to present evidence of a negative RT-PCR result from a test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    If you do not have a valid proof of vaccination/recovery and you do not have a negative or not detected RT-PCR test taken within 72 hours you must quarantine in a hotel. Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    To protect its citizens against the importation of variants, an ‘emergency brake’ mechanism is coordinated at EU level to react swiftly to the emergence of a variant of concern or variant of interest. The Government advice is to avoid travel to a country where the emergency brake has been applied.

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates in a country to which the EU has not applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.

    If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • present evidence of a negative PCR test result within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in a country to which the EU has applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • have a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • produce evidence of a negative result from a PCR test undertaken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this his must be pre-booked and prepaied in advance of travel;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland, you will be able to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children aged between 12 and 17 must also have valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 to be exempt from travel-related testing.

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered adults, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine.

    Travellers will be asked to show evidence of the negative or ‘not detected’ result to a COVID-19 test before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    People who do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine are committing an offence and can be fined up to € 2 500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    Note: for the purposes of travel, travellers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency with recommended number of days after the final dose.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    To protect its citizens against the importation of variants, an ‘emergency brake’ mechanism is coordinated at EU level to react swiftly to the emergence of a variant of concern or variant of interest. The Government advice is to avoid travel to a country where the emergency brake has been applied.

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates in a country to which the EU has not applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.

    If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • present evidence of a negative PCR test result within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in a country to which the EU has applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • have a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • produce evidence of a negative result from a PCR test undertaken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this his must be pre-booked and prepaied in advance of travel;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland, you will be able to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children aged between 12 and 17 must also have valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 to be exempt from travel-related testing.

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered adults, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine.

    Travellers will be asked to show evidence of the negative or ‘not detected’ result to a COVID-19 test before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    People who do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine are committing an offence and can be fined up to € 2 500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    Note: for the purposes of travel, travellers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency with recommended number of days after the final dose.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    27.07.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Borders reopen for non-essential travel on 19 July (Simple Flying18.07.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Passengers arriving in Ireland without a EUDCC must:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • If you do not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, you will need to present evidence of a negative RT-PCR result from a test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country.

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here gov.ie Government advice on international travel.

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Note: this section includes rules for people arriving from Great Britain.

    Ireland also broadly aligns itself to the EU approach to non-essential travel into the EU from third countries. To protect its citizens against the importation of variants, an ‘emergency brake’ mechanism is coordinated at EU level to react swiftly to the emergence of a variant of concern or variant of interest. Government advice is to avoid travel to a country where the emergency brake has been applied.

    SCENARIO 1: journey originates in a country to which the EU has not applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, no travel-related testing or quarantine is necessary.

    If the passenger does not have valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • present evidence of a negative PCR test result within 72 hours prior to arrival into the country;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    SCENARIO 2: journey originates in a country to which the EU has applied an ‘Emergency Brake’

    If the passenger has valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 in the past 180 days, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • have a negative result from a PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo self-quarantine for 14 days;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a RT-PCR test can be taken from day 5 onwards after arrival into Ireland: with a negative result the quarantine ends. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19. This test will be provided through the HSE.

    If the passenger does not have a valid proof of vaccination or recovery, they need to:

    • fill out a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form before departure;
    • produce evidence of a negative result from a PCR test undertaken no more than 72 hours before arrival;
    • undergo mandatory hotel quarantine – this his must be pre-booked and prepaied in advance of travel;
    • undergo post-arrival testing – a negative result from a RT-PCR test taken from day 10 onwards after arrival into Ireland, you will be able to leave quarantine. Quarantine will be extended if the passenger tests positive for COVID-19.

    Children aged between 12 and 17 must also have valid proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19 to be exempt from travel-related testing.

    Children of any age, travelling with accompanying vaccinated or recovered adults, will not be required to self-quarantine post arrival. However, where one accompanying adult needs to self-quarantine, then all children must also self-quarantine.

    Travellers will be asked to show evidence of the negative or ‘not detected’ result to a COVID-19 test before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    People who do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine are committing an offence and can be fined up to € 2 500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    Note: for the purposes of travel, travellers are considered vaccinated if they have been vaccinated with a vaccine approved by the European Medicines Agency with recommended number of days after the final dose.

     

    Find out more:
    Government advice on international travel
    General COVID-19 Travel Advisory in Operation
    Designated States and exemptions to rules on pre-departure RT-PCR tests
    Mandatory hotel quarantine

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    21.07.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Ireland limits indoor hospitality to vaccinated over Delta fears (Reuters, 29.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    The following requirements will apply:

    • Requirement to complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form
    • Requirement to have a negative / ‘not detected’ result from a pre-departure COVID-19 RT PCR test (only this kind of test is acceptable) taken within 72 hours prior to arrival in Ireland.
    • If travel originates outside the EU, passengers will be required to home quarantine for 14 days. This quarantine can be ended on Day 5 on receipt of a negative test.
    • If you arrive from Category2/Designated State, you will be required to undergo mandatory hotel quarantine. Details on mandatory hotel quarantine are here

    Further information on travelling to Ireland is available here: gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic (www.gov.ie)

    There are specific travel arrangements in place for those travelling from Great Britain. Please see the gov.ie website for more information: gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic (www.gov.ie)

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children under 7 years old are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    07.07.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Ireland limits indoor hospitality to vaccinated over Delta fears (Reuters, 29.06.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children under 7 years old are exempted.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you arrive without evidence of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption:

    • this is an offence
    • you must enter and pay for mandatory quarantine in a hotel until either you receive a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test result or you have quarantined in the hotel for 10 days

    Mandatory quarantine requirements apply to all persons who have been overseas in the 14-days prior to entering Ireland. Arrivals from designated high-risk countries are subject to mandatory hotel quarantine. Persons exempt from mandatory hotel quarantine may still be required to quarantine at home. For all others arriving in Ireland from non-designated countries:

    • a 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • passengers who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime
    • you may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period to take a COVID-19 test, or for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State
    • passengers are requested to arrange a COVID-19 Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) test to be taken at least 5 days after arrival in Ireland
    • this test is free of charge
    • the test should be booked in advance of arrival in Ireland and must be booked for a date at least 5 days after arrival

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children under 7 years old are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    05.07.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News:

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children under 7 years old are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    Passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to undertake Mandatory Hotel Quarantine and pre-book a place in the designated facility prior to arrival to Ireland. Passengers will be required to present evidence of this booking to their flight or ferry operator in order to board the aeroplane or ferry to Ireland.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children under 7 years old are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Ireland is moving forward with its phased reopening over the summer, as set out in ‘COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery: The Path Ahead’ (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government Website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organized indoor gatherings
    • Organized outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the
    Irish Government website.

    Read more
    29.06.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Irish government may permit restriction-free travel for vaccinated U.S. nationals by mid-June (Schengen Visa Info, 20.05.2021). Travel restrictions eased; hotels will be allowed to reopen on 2 June (Dublin Live, 10.05.2021). Irish government removes Austria and Italy from hotel quarantine list (Reuters, 08.05.2021). Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to undertake Mandatory Hotel Quarantine and pre-book a place in the designated facility prior to arrival to Ireland. Passengers will be required to present evidence of this booking to their flight or ferry operator in order to board the aeroplane or ferry to Ireland.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    21.05.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Travel restrictions eased; hotels will be allowed to reopen on 2 June (Dublin Live, 10.05.2021). Irish government removes Austria and Italy from hotel quarantine list (Reuters, 08.05.2021). Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to undertake Mandatory Hotel Quarantine and pre-book a place in the designated facility prior to arrival to Ireland. Passengers will be required to present evidence of this booking to their flight or ferry operator in order to board the aeroplane or ferry to Ireland.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    12.05.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Travel restrictions eased; hotels will be allowed to reopen on 2 June (Dublin Live, 10.05.2021). Irish government removes Austria and Italy from hotel quarantine list (Reuters, 08.05.2021). Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    11.05.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Irish government removes Austria and Italy from hotel quarantine list (Reuters, 08.05.2021). Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    07.05.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Hotels and restaurants to reopen in early June; other COVID-19 restrictions to be relaxed in May (Reuters, 29.04.2021). Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021). Travelers from Ireland must present negative COVID-19 test results upon arrival after Cyprus government removes country from red list (Schengen Visa Info News, 19.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe
    Health cover for temporary stays

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:

    *Local advice: Wide-ranging Covid-related restrictions are in place in Ireland, and were revised on 30 March. Ireland remains at Level 5, the top tier of its restrictions, with various changes due to come into effect on 4 May, 10 and 17 May, with possible further changes in June (subject to the public health situation at the time). For more information on these changes see the Irish Government website.
    For up-to-date guidance on which restrictions are in place, and when changes will be made, please see the Irish Government website. This includes extensive detail on the restrictions affecting the following areas:
    • Bars, cafes & restaurants (including hotel restaurants and bars)
    • Construction
    • Exercise & sporting events
    • Funerals
    • Hotels & accommodation
    • Museums, galleries & other cultural attractions
    • Organised indoor gatherings
    • Organised outdoor gatherings
    • Outdoor playgrounds, play areas & parks
    • Over 70s & others at increased risk of severe illness
    • Religious services
    • Retail and services (e.g. hairdressers, beauticians, barbers)
    • Schools and higher and adult education
    • Social & family gatherings
    • Social meetings for fully-vaccinated people
    • Transport
    • Travel restrictions
    • Visiting long-term residential care facilities
    • Weddings
    • Wet pubs
    • Work
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    01.05.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021). Travelers from Ireland must present negative COVID-19 test results upon arrival after Cyprus government removes country from red list (Schengen Visa Info News, 19.04.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    29.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Domestic travel ban set to be lifted after 7 June (RSPV Live, 28.04.2021). Travelers from Ireland must present negative COVID-19 test results upon arrival after Cyprus government removes country from red list (Schengen Visa Info News, 19.04.2021). Government adds 26 countries (including USA, France, Germany and Italy) to mandatory COVID-19 quarantine list (Reuters, 01.04.2021). Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    28.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Travelers from Ireland must present negative COVID-19 test results upon arrival after Cyprus government removes country from red list (Schengen Visa Info News, 19.04.2021). Government adds 26 countries (including USA, France, Germany and Italy) to mandatory COVID-19 quarantine list (Reuters, 01.04.2021). Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    26.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Travelers from Ireland must present negative COVID-19 test results upon arrival after Cyprus government removes country from red list (Schengen Visa Info News, 19.04.2021). Government adds 26 countries (including USA, France, Germany and Italy) to mandatory COVID-19 quarantine list (Reuters, 01.04.2021). Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021). COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    19.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Government adds 26 countries (including USA, France, Germany and Italy) to mandatory COVID-19 quarantine list (Reuters, 01.04.2021). Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021). COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    09.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Government adds 26 countries (including USA, France, Germany and Italy) to mandatory COVID-19 quarantine list (Reuters, 01.04.2021). Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021). COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    02.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021). COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are now required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test. If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may shorten your quarantine period by taking an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    01.04.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: Authorities to require passengers to take COVID-19 test on arrival (Reuters, 30.03.2021). COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU: Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit: As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction. EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence. Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply. Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries: Is a coronavirus test required? Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival. You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    31.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries: See From within the EU.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    30.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries: See From within the EU.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    29.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    All travellers are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    All passengers arriving into Ireland from designated States after 4 am on the morning of Friday, 26 March are required to pre-book accommodation in a designated quarantine facility, and to pre-pay for their stay.

    If you come into Ireland from any country deemed ‘high risk’, or If you come to Ireland without a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test, you must complete a 14-day mandatory quarantine in a hotel.

    If you come to Ireland from any country not deemed ‘high risk’, you must quarantine at home provided you have a negative or ‘not detected’ PCR test.

    If you are not arriving from high-risk countries, you may also shorten your quarantine period by taking a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end.

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    All travellers coming into Ireland must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    Passengers who are travelling immediately onwards to Northern Ireland should indicate this and will only be required to fill out a portion of the online COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

    *From Third Countries: See From within the EU.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    26.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies to ALL arrivals:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature, or to leave the State.

    You may also leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end. You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you travel to Ireland from any of the high-risk countries, you must complete the full 14-day quarantine period regardless of whether you have a negative test result.

    The list of high-risk countries is available at www.gov.ie

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    23.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries: As above.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    19.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies to ALL arrivals:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature, or to leave the State.

    You may also leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end. You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you travel to Ireland from any of the high-risk countries, you must complete the full 14-day quarantine period regardless of whether you have a negative test result.

    The list of high-risk countries is available at www.gov.ie

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    16.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies to ALL arrivals:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature, or to leave the State.

    You may also leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end. You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you travel to Ireland from any of the high-risk countries, you must complete the full 14-day quarantine period regardless of whether you have a negative test result.

    The list of high-risk countries is available at www.gov.ie

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    *Quarantine Requirements: The Irish Government has introduced a legal requirement that all travellers (except those whose journey originates in Northern Ireland) must quarantine on arrival, with very limited exceptions.
    This applies to all arrivals from 4 February 2021:
    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both. You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave Ireland. You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival – if you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.
    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days. If your journey began in one of the high risk countries listed below you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result.
    *Limited exemptions from mandatory quarantine: There some limited exemptions from the requirement to complete mandatory quarantine:
    • patients travelling for urgent medical reasons
    • international transport workers in possession of an Annex 3 Certificate; Drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles; Aviation and maritime crew
    • Gardaí/defence forces, while carrying out their duties
    • travel to Ireland pursuant to an arrest warrant, extradition proceedings or other mandatory legal obligation
    • diplomats, or travel to perform the function of or provide services to an office holder or elected representative
    • transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport.
    For more information on quarantine exemptions, please go to the Irish Government’s website. This includes details on people who may temporarily leave their places of quarantine to perform essential functions.
    *Travelling to Ireland from high risk countries:
    If you travel to Ireland from: Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of South Africa, Rwanda, Seychelles, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
    You must:
    • undertake a 14-day quarantine period at the address specified on your Passenger Locator Form
    • complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.
    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, to leave Ireland, or to avail of a test when requested to do so in writing by the HSE.
    You should phone any GP or GP out-of-hours service to arrange a free COVID-19 test. The test should be done 5 days after you arrived in Ireland or as soon as possible after those 5 days, and this test will be provided by the HSE. You may leave your quarantine to take this test. Whatever the result of the test, you must complete the 14 day period of quarantine.
    Very limited exemptions apply to travellers from the requirement to complete this mandatory quarantine. These include: patients travelling for urgent medical reasons; international transport workers; and transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport. For more information on the exemptions please go to the Irish Governments website.
    *Data collection – Passenger Locator forms: If you are coming to Ireland from overseas you must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form. This is available online.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    12.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies to ALL arrivals:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature, or to leave the State.

    You may also leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end. You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you travel to Ireland from any of the high-risk countries, you must complete the full 14-day quarantine period regardless of whether you have a negative test result.

    The list of high-risk countries is available at www.gov.ie

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    *Quarantine Requirements: The Irish Government has introduced a legal requirement that all travellers (except those whose journey originates in Northern Ireland) must quarantine on arrival, with very limited exceptions.
    This applies to all arrivals from 4 February 2021:
    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both. You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave Ireland. You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival – if you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.
    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days. If your journey began in one of the high risk countries listed below you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result.
    *Limited exemptions from mandatory quarantine: There some limited exemptions from the requirement to complete mandatory quarantine:
    • patients travelling for urgent medical reasons
    • international transport workers in possession of an Annex 3 Certificate; Drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles; Aviation and maritime crew
    • Gardaí/defence forces, while carrying out their duties
    • travel to Ireland pursuant to an arrest warrant, extradition proceedings or other mandatory legal obligation
    • diplomats, or travel to perform the function of or provide services to an office holder or elected representative
    • transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport.
    For more information on quarantine exemptions, please go to the Irish Government’s website. This includes details on people who may temporarily leave their places of quarantine to perform essential functions.
    *Travelling to Ireland from high risk countries:
    If you travel to Ireland from: Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of South Africa, Rwanda, Seychelles, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
    You must:
    • undertake a 14-day quarantine period at the address specified on your Passenger Locator Form
    • complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.
    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, to leave Ireland, or to avail of a test when requested to do so in writing by the HSE.
    You should phone any GP or GP out-of-hours service to arrange a free COVID-19 test. The test should be done 5 days after you arrived in Ireland or as soon as possible after those 5 days, and this test will be provided by the HSE. You may leave your quarantine to take this test. Whatever the result of the test, you must complete the 14 day period of quarantine.
    Very limited exemptions apply to travellers from the requirement to complete this mandatory quarantine. These include: patients travelling for urgent medical reasons; international transport workers; and transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport. For more information on the exemptions please go to the Irish Governments website.
    *Data collection – Passenger Locator forms: If you are coming to Ireland from overseas you must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form. This is available online.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    09.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021). Lockdown extended until 5 March as COVID-19 concerns continue (Irish Mirror, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies to ALL arrivals:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature, or to leave the State.

    You may also leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative or ‘not detected’, your period of quarantine can end. You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    If you travel to Ireland from any of the high-risk countries, you must complete the full 14-day quarantine period regardless of whether you have a negative test result.

    The list of high-risk countries is available at www.gov.ie

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    *Quarantine Requirements: The Irish Government has introduced a legal requirement that all travellers (except those whose journey originates in Northern Ireland) must quarantine on arrival, with very limited exceptions.
    This applies to all arrivals from 4 February 2021:
    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both. You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave Ireland. You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival – if you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.
    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days. If your journey began in one of the high risk countries listed below you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result.
    *Limited exemptions from mandatory quarantine: There some limited exemptions from the requirement to complete mandatory quarantine:
    • patients travelling for urgent medical reasons
    • international transport workers in possession of an Annex 3 Certificate; Drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles; Aviation and maritime crew
    • Gardaí/defence forces, while carrying out their duties
    • travel to Ireland pursuant to an arrest warrant, extradition proceedings or other mandatory legal obligation
    • diplomats, or travel to perform the function of or provide services to an office holder or elected representative
    • transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport.
    For more information on quarantine exemptions, please go to the Irish Government’s website. This includes details on people who may temporarily leave their places of quarantine to perform essential functions.
    *Travelling to Ireland from high risk countries:
    If you travel to Ireland from: Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of South Africa, Rwanda, Seychelles, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
    You must:
    • undertake a 14-day quarantine period at the address specified on your Passenger Locator Form
    • complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.
    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, to leave Ireland, or to avail of a test when requested to do so in writing by the HSE.
    You should phone any GP or GP out-of-hours service to arrange a free COVID-19 test. The test should be done 5 days after you arrived in Ireland or as soon as possible after those 5 days, and this test will be provided by the HSE. You may leave your quarantine to take this test. Whatever the result of the test, you must complete the 14 day period of quarantine.
    Very limited exemptions apply to travellers from the requirement to complete this mandatory quarantine. These include: patients travelling for urgent medical reasons; international transport workers; and transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport. For more information on the exemptions please go to the Irish Governments website.
    *Data collection – Passenger Locator forms: If you are coming to Ireland from overseas you must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form. This is available online.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    05.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021). Lockdown extended until 5 March as COVID-19 concerns continue (Irish Mirror, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you travel to Ireland from Angola; Botswana; Brazil; Burundi; Cape Verde; the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Lesotho; Malawi; Eswatini; Mauritius; Mozambique; Namibia; Republic of South Africa; Rwanda; Seychelles; Tanzania; United Arab Emirates; Zambia; Zimbabwe:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    *Quarantine Requirements: The Irish Government has introduced a legal requirement that all travellers (except those whose journey originates in Northern Ireland) must quarantine on arrival, with very limited exceptions.
    This applies to all arrivals from 4 February 2021:
    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both. You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave Ireland. You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival – if you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.
    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days. If your journey began in one of the high risk countries listed below you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result.
    *Limited exemptions from mandatory quarantine: There some limited exemptions from the requirement to complete mandatory quarantine:
    • patients travelling for urgent medical reasons
    • international transport workers in possession of an Annex 3 Certificate; Drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles; Aviation and maritime crew
    • Gardaí/defence forces, while carrying out their duties
    • travel to Ireland pursuant to an arrest warrant, extradition proceedings or other mandatory legal obligation
    • diplomats, or travel to perform the function of or provide services to an office holder or elected representative
    • transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport.
    For more information on quarantine exemptions, please go to the Irish Government’s website. This includes details on people who may temporarily leave their places of quarantine to perform essential functions.
    *Travelling to Ireland from high risk countries:
    If you travel to Ireland from: Angola, Argentina, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eswatini, French Guiana, Guyana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of South Africa, Rwanda, Seychelles, Suriname, Tanzania, United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
    You must:
    • undertake a 14-day quarantine period at the address specified on your Passenger Locator Form
    • complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result
    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500, or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.
    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, to leave Ireland, or to avail of a test when requested to do so in writing by the HSE.
    You should phone any GP or GP out-of-hours service to arrange a free COVID-19 test. The test should be done 5 days after you arrived in Ireland or as soon as possible after those 5 days, and this test will be provided by the HSE. You may leave your quarantine to take this test. Whatever the result of the test, you must complete the 14 day period of quarantine.
    Very limited exemptions apply to travellers from the requirement to complete this mandatory quarantine. These include: patients travelling for urgent medical reasons; international transport workers; and transit passengers who arrive for the purposes of travelling to another state, and who do not leave the port or airport. For more information on the exemptions please go to the Irish Governments website.
    *Data collection – Passenger Locator forms: If you are coming to Ireland from overseas you must complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form. This is available online.

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    01.03.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021). Lockdown extended until 5 March as COVID-19 concerns continue (Irish Mirror, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you travel to Ireland from Angola; Botswana; Brazil; Burundi; Cape Verde; the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Lesotho; Malawi; Eswatini; Mauritius; Mozambique; Namibia; Republic of South Africa; Rwanda; Seychelles; Tanzania; United Arab Emirates; Zambia; Zimbabwe:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 23 February, the Irish Government published a new strategy document: COVID-19 Resilience and Recovery 2021: The Path Ahead. On 23 February Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 April, prior to which a further review would be concluded. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government website
    *Guide to the Level 5 restrictions
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    24.02.2021
  • Republic of Ireland Latest News: COVID-19 restrictions will remain in place until at least 5 April (Thejournal.ie, 23.02.2021). Irish government to impose 14-day quarantine on incoming travelers from 20 countries because of COVID-19 variants (Reuters, 11.02.2021). Irish government to introduce hotel quarantine measures in mid-February for travelers from Brazil, South Africa and other countries deemed ‘high risk’ (Independent, 05.02.2021). Ireland to introduce 14-day quarantine in hotels for arrivals from Brazil and South Africa (Reuters, 26.01.2021). Lockdown extended until 5 March as COVID-19 concerns continue (Irish Mirror, 26.01.2021).

    International Restrictions:
    *From within the EU:

    Ireland is implementing the commonly agreed EU “traffic lights” approach to travel restrictions.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take a RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence, and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take a RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Documents you need to travel in Europe

    *Transit:

    As a general rule, passengers in transit in the EU+ area are exempted from temporary travel restriction.

    EU citizens entering the EU from a third country, as well as their family members, irrespective of their nationality, are exempted from the travel restrictions regardless of whether or not they are returning to their country of nationality or residence.

    Passengers travelling from a non-EU country to another non-EU country may transit through the international transit area of airports located in the Schengen area. Rules regarding airport transit visa requirements continue to apply.

    *From Third Countries:

    If you travel to Ireland from Angola; Botswana; Brazil; Burundi; Cape Verde; the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Lesotho; Malawi; Eswatini; Mauritius; Mozambique; Namibia; Republic of South Africa; Rwanda; Seychelles; Tanzania; United Arab Emirates; Zambia; Zimbabwe:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • you must complete the full 14 days of quarantine – regardless of whether you have a negative test result

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

     

    Is a coronavirus test required?

    Passenger arrivals from ALL countries are subject to the requirement for a pre-departure negative PCR test. The test must be taken within 72 hours prior to arrival.

    You will be asked to show evidence of this negative or ‘not detected’ result before boarding the airplane or ferry from the country you are travelling from, and will be denied boarding if you cannot produce such evidence. Once you arrive in Ireland, you have to provide this evidence to Irish immigration officers.

    You should retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

    In case of lack of a negative or ‘not detected’ RT-PCR test or a valid exemption, you can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months. You will also be required to take an RT-PCR test after arrival at your own expense.

    Children aged 6 and under are exempted.

     

    Is a quarantine required?

    A legal requirement to quarantine has been introduced for all travellers (except if your journey originates in Northern Ireland) with very limited exceptions.

    This applies for ALL arrivals from 4 February 2021:

    • A 14-day quarantine period must be undertaken at the address specified on the Passenger Locator Form
    • persons who travel from another country to Ireland, and arrive via Northern Ireland, must also observe the mandatory quarantine regime

    If you do not fulfil the legal requirement for mandatory quarantine you are committing an offence and can be fined up to €2,500 or get a prison sentence of up to 6 months, or both.

    You may only leave your place of residence during the quarantine period for unavoidable reasons of an emergency nature to protect a person’s health or welfare, or to leave the State.

    You may leave to take an RT-PCR test no less than 5 days after your arrival. If you receive written confirmation that the result of this test is negative/ ‘not detected’ your period of quarantine can end.

    You must retain the written confirmation of your test result for at least 14 days.

     

    Passenger Locator Form

    If you arrive in Ireland from another country, you must fill in a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

     

    Find out more:
    gov.ie – Travelling to Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic

    Internal Restrictions:
    *Coronavirus travel health: The Irish Government publishes information on cases at a national and local level on its COVID-19 Data Hub.

    *Local advice: On 15 September, the Irish Government published a plan for ‘Living with COVID-19’ in the 6-9 months covering the end of 2020 and early 2021. The revised strategy includes a ‘Framework for Restrictive Measures’ designed to allow people to understand, anticipate and prepare for the measures the government might introduce to stop escalation of the virus. The Framework consists of 5 Levels, which will be imposed depending on the incidence of COVID-19. On 26 January Ireland announced Level 5 measures would remain in place until at least 5 March. A summary is provided below, but for full details of measures in place please visit the Irish Government websites:
    – Visitors to your home or garden: no visitors except for essential family reasons or those in your support bubble;

    – Domestic travel: stay at home except for travel for work, education or other essential purposes, or to take exercise within 5km of home

    – Retail: essential retail only:

    – Schools: closed until further notice;

    – Work: work from home unless working in essential health, social care or other essential service that cannot be done from home

    – Wedding: maximum of 6 guests;

    – Funerals: Maximum of 10 mourners.
    Visit the Irish Government website
    Visit the Irish Government website for more information on these measures. The link also includes detail on Level 5 measures not included in the table above, such as: Early Childhood Care & Education (ECCE); social gatherings; organised events (e.g. sporting events and funerals); outdoor playgrounds and parks; transport; long-term residential facilities; and guidance for over-70s.
    *Face coverings: The Irish government recommends that face coverings are worn in crowded workplaces, places of worship and in busy or crowded outdoor spaces where there is significant congregation. For more information on exemptions and a complete list of settings where wearing a face covering is required, please see the Irish Government website.

    Read more
    23.02.2021
  • Source Foreign travel advice, Gov.UK/
    US State Dept. COVID-19 Country Specific Information/
    Re-open Europe/
    Government of Ireland/
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